The aquarium’s goal of net zero emissions starts with a solar tree

The National Aquarium has taken a green step by unveiling its new Solar Tree sculpture. The large-scale sculpture is a functional solar energy collector and a symbol of something even bigger. A groundbreaking Tuesday showed off the new renewable rays that the tree will transfer as clean energy to the National Aquarium’s power grid. It was also a celebration of the aquarium’s solar project running on the east coast which provides the equivalent of 40% of the aquarium’s energy use. “When people come to the aquarium, they can’t really see it or aren’t really aware of the clean energy impact it has. So the goal is really to inspire them to learn more “said Carrie Stockwell, director of philanthropy at Constellation Energy. Longtime Aquarium CEO John Racanelli said the mission goes beyond a race for the sun. He hopes for a second revival along the waterfront organization, Racanelli said the aquarium also wants to keep the Chesapeake Bay healthy. This means building a “reinvented waterfront”. Now it consists of bio-cabins and a small prototype ecosystem, but the goal is to put 14,000 square feet of floating wetlands in the water between the two pillars of the aquarium – all projects leading to a brighter future in Baltimore. “It’s just amazing to see leaders like the National Aquarium setting a bold goal to truly change the future for our children and future generations,” Stockwell said. is to achieve zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2035.

The National Aquarium has decided to go green by unveiling its new Solar Tree sculpture.

The large-scale sculpture is a functional solar energy collector and a symbol of something even bigger. A groundbreaking Tuesday unveiled the new renewable rays that the tree will transfer as clean energy to the National Aquarium’s power grid.

It was also a celebration of the aquarium’s solar project running on the east coast which provides the equivalent of 40% of the aquarium’s energy consumption.

“When people come to the aquarium, they can’t really see it or aren’t really aware of the clean energy impact it has. So the goal is really to inspire them to learn more “said Carrie Stockwell, the director of philanthropy for Constellation Energy.

The Aquarium’s longtime CEO, John Racanelli, said the mission goes beyond a race for the sun. He hopes for a second revival along the waterfront.

“It’s important for us to really demonstrate that organizations can reduce energy consumption, improve efficiency and sustainability, and set a real model for others across the country,” Racanelli said.

As a conservation organization, Racanelli said the aquarium also wants to keep the Chesapeake Bay healthy. This means building a “reinvented waterfront”. Now it consists of bio-cabins and a small prototype ecosystem, but the goal is to put 14,000 square feet of floating wetland in the water between the two pillars of the aquarium – all projects leading to a brighter future in Baltimore.

“It’s just amazing to see leaders like the National Aquarium setting a bold goal to truly change the future for our children and future generations,” Stockwell said.

The goal is to achieve net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2035.

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