Sculpture – Momento Dada http://momentodada.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 14:15:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://momentodada.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T222814.835-150x150.png Sculpture – Momento Dada http://momentodada.com/ 32 32 State of Florida unveils statue of former President John Thrasher https://momentodada.com/state-of-florida-unveils-statue-of-former-president-john-thrasher/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 11:04:20 +0000 https://momentodada.com/state-of-florida-unveils-statue-of-former-president-john-thrasher/ Florida State University former president John Thrasher was honored with a bronze statue Saturday morning in Westcott Plaza as FSU honored him for the important roles he played at the university. Joined by his wife Jean Thrasher with their children Jennifer Jordan, Jon Thrasher and Julie Weinberg, the 15th President of FSU – who served […]]]>

Florida State University former president John Thrasher was honored with a bronze statue Saturday morning in Westcott Plaza as FSU honored him for the important roles he played at the university.

Joined by his wife Jean Thrasher with their children Jennifer Jordan, Jon Thrasher and Julie Weinberg, the 15th President of FSU – who served from November 2014 to August 2021 – attended the unveiling of the statue as it depicted him saluting from new graduates at a launch ceremony.

“Your statue, Dad, will be an ongoing reminder that you will greet all students, staff and alumni with the warmth and love you have always had for FSU,” Jordan told his father during the tribute. Saturday, according to a statement from the university. .

Former FSU President John Thrasher thanks the university and friends for erecting a bronze statue of him on Saturday, November 19, 2022 in Westcott Square on the campus in Tallahassee, Florida.

“Our family is so proud of you,” she added. “We look forward to coming to see your statue and reflect on your legacy for years to come.”

The bronze figure took approximately a year to sculpt and was created by FSU’s Master Craftsman Studio with professional and eminent sculptor Sandy Proctor, whose high-caliber artwork includes a 2004 statue of the legendary coach chief football officer Bobby Bowden, who died in 2021.

Learn more about John Thrasher:

A bronze statue of former FSU President John Thrasher is unveiled in Westcott Square Saturday, Nov. 19, 2022, in Tallahassee, Florida.

FSU commissions a bronze sculpture for each president of the university, and it’s a tradition for a new president to commission a sculpture of his or her predecessor, according to Master Craftsman studio program director Raulerson.

When Thrasher began his presidency, he commissioned a sculpture of President Emeritus Eric Barron. The tradition began with TK Wetherell commissioning a statue of Talbot “Sandy” D’Alemberte, who served from 1994 to 2003.

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Climate protesters simultaneously target sculptures in three European cities – ARTnews.com https://momentodada.com/climate-protesters-simultaneously-target-sculptures-in-three-european-cities-artnews-com/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 15:35:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/climate-protesters-simultaneously-target-sculptures-in-three-european-cities-artnews-com/ On Friday, climate activists in Europe targeted works of art in three locations, but the protests were a departure from past actions because these works were not protected by glass. All three protests were also held for the first time on the same day as part of a concerted effort. Friday in Paris, Milan and […]]]>

On Friday, climate activists in Europe targeted works of art in three locations, but the protests were a departure from past actions because these works were not protected by glass. All three protests were also held for the first time on the same day as part of a concerted effort.

Friday in Paris, Milan and Oslo, climate activists from local organizations grouped under the umbrella A22 network doused sculptures in orange paint or flour as UN climate talks unfolded in Egypt. This time, the works were hit hard and were not covered with protection. Two cases concerned exterior sculptures. Nevertheless, none of the works of art are said to have been damaged, although some are still monitored for possible additional cleaning.

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At the main entrance of Trade Exchange – Musée Pinault Collection in Paris, two members of the French group Last Renovation sprayed Charles Raythe stainless steel sculpture of Horse and Rider with orange paint. One of the protesters also climbed onto the life-size horse and put a white T-shirt on the rider’s chest. The shirt read, “We have 858 days left,” referring to a deadline to reduce carbon emissions.

Hard-debated attacks on artworks by climate activists continue at a rapid pace around the world, but so far most cases have involved artworks kept behind glass coverings, preventing any actual damage. But fears persist that similar acts could potentially cause irreversible damage. Earlier this month, a joint statement by international museum directors said they were “deeply shocked by…[the] risky endangerment” of works of art in their custody in light of this continuing trend.

On Friday, French Culture Minister Rima Abdul Malak visited the Bourse de Commerce after the incident, and tweeted: “Eco-vandalism goes up a notch: an unprotected sculpture by Charles Ray has been sprayed with paint in Paris.” Abdul Malak thanked the staff who “responded quickly”, adding: “Art and environmentalism are not mutually exclusive. On the contrary, these are common causes!

The stock exchange, whose CEO Emma Lavigne was present during Abdul Malak’s visit, declined to comment on the incident. Charles Ray’s studio also did not respond to request for comment.

On the same day, the 46-foot-tall Monolith (1944) by Gustave Vigeland in Oslo Vigeland Sculpture Park, along with surrounding sculptures by the same artist, were also sprayed with orange paint by a local group, Stopp oljeletinga (Stop Oil Search). The Oslo Monolith is a popular outdoor attraction and depicts 121 men, women and children intertwined and carved from a single piece of granite.

Cleaning the porous sculptures will be more complicated than other works that have been targeted, the museum said.

“We have done the necessary cleaning for now. However, we [continue to] monitor the situation to see if the paint has penetrated the granite. If so, we will of course look at other requirements,” Vigeland Museum Director Jarle Strømodden said in an email to ART news. “Neither The Monolith, nor the granite sculptures in question, suffered any physical damage. The sculptures are located in a public domain, a park open to everyone 24/7 365. It’s all about trust.

French group Last Renovation explained that Friday’s various protests involving works of art took place “simultaneously around the world”, according to the group’s Instagram post.

On the same day in Milan, the local Ultima Generazione (Last Generation) poured sacks of flour at Andy Warhol 1979 painted BMW at Fabbrica Del Vapore art center. The group also confirmed that “the action took place simultaneously in other countries of the world, with the other campaigns of the A22 Network”.

Reached by phone, an employee of Fabbrica Del Vapore said the Warhol-painted BMW had been cleaned and was back as part of their Andy Warhol exhibit until March 2023.

Reactions to the climate protesters’ dramatic methods are mixed. Israeli writer Etgar Keret recently compared the attacks to a form of “hate crime against art”, in a November 17 article. editorial for the French daily Release. Meanwhile, political journalist Thomas Legrand, claimed in the same French daily that climate activists are “actually quite calm”, if we compare them to the French “ultra-leftist” groups of the 1970s and 1980s.” I find them rather patient, polite and peaceful,” he said. wrote, given the urgent context. “How can we not understand?”

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Frozen with Desire, a 6,200 diamond sculpture by Brendan Murphy will be exhibited at Art Miami 2022 with Burgess Projects https://momentodada.com/frozen-with-desire-a-6200-diamond-sculpture-by-brendan-murphy-will-be-exhibited-at-art-miami-2022-with-burgess-projects/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 04:59:31 +0000 https://momentodada.com/frozen-with-desire-a-6200-diamond-sculpture-by-brendan-murphy-will-be-exhibited-at-art-miami-2022-with-burgess-projects/ For centuries, humanity has looked at the stars and dreamed of discovery. The continued exploration of space has been a symbol of an unarmed spirit and a boundless desire, pushing us to achieve feats that once seemed impossible – to reach infinity and beyond. This year, artist Brendan Murphy illustrates this spirit with the exhibition […]]]>

For centuries, humanity has looked at the stars and dreamed of discovery. The continued exploration of space has been a symbol of an unarmed spirit and a boundless desire, pushing us to achieve feats that once seemed impossible – to reach infinity and beyond.

This year, artist Brendan Murphy illustrates this spirit with the exhibition of Frozen with desire exhibited by Burgess Projects at Art Miami from November 28 to December 4.

The 42-inch cobalt blue chrome sculpture is labeled with Murphy’s signature formulas in blue and white. Her face mask and side details are encrusted with an incredible 6,213 sparkling diamonds of the highest quality that total an incredible 517 carats set in three kilos of cast platinum. Seductive by a conjectural gravitational attraction that brings the viewer closer, the refinement of the astronaut ignites all the senses.

“I wanted to create a piece worthy of a time capsule,” says Murphy. “Something that represents both my work and the moment in time we live in. Using materials that are millions of years old and pairing them with a very iconic symbol of our generation just made sense to me. The visual and emotional impact this piece creates when you stand in front of it is hard to describe and exceeded my wildest expectations.”

The level of detail and craftsmanship that went into creating Frozen with Desire is truly astonishing and a testament to the talent of the artist who created it. “The sculpture is a reminder of the power of nature and an amazing example of the human ability to create art that captures the unfathomable beauty of the natural world…as well as a tribute to mankind’s creative genius that has enabled humans to ‘explore outer space,’ says Lisa Burgess, founder of Burgess Projects.

Brendan Murphy is a widely known contemporary artist whose work is represented in over 600 private collections. His work pushes the boundaries of creativity, exploring sculptural pieces, conceptual works and a wide range of rare materials. Murphy’s unique approach to creating art has captured the attention of collectors and critics, and his work is celebrated for its universal appeal. Brendan Murphy is an important voice in the contemporary art world, and his work will continue to provoke and delight viewers for years to come.

Visitors can see Frozen with desire at Burgess Projects, Booth #AM425 at Art Miami November 28-December 4. Contact Lisa Burgess for more information, video clips and hi-res images.

Build ID: 436317

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New exhibition by artist Sam Mahon shows that art is not just entertainment https://momentodada.com/new-exhibition-by-artist-sam-mahon-shows-that-art-is-not-just-entertainment/ Sun, 13 Nov 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/new-exhibition-by-artist-sam-mahon-shows-that-art-is-not-just-entertainment/ Provided Artist and activist Sam Mahon is set to host and feature in an exhibition called Sculpture, which is a bit out of the ordinary of normal exhibitions. Sam Mahon takes a low-key approach to controversy in his latest exhibition – but there are always undertones to stick with the man. His latest exhibition, Sculpture, […]]]>
Artist and activist Sam Mahon is set to host and feature in an exhibition called Sculpture, which is a bit out of the ordinary of normal exhibitions.

Provided

Artist and activist Sam Mahon is set to host and feature in an exhibition called Sculpture, which is a bit out of the ordinary of normal exhibitions.

Sam Mahon takes a low-key approach to controversy in his latest exhibition – but there are always undertones to stick with the man.

His latest exhibition, Sculpture, sees him collaborate with eight other artists to show and talk about their work through recorded interviews on his website.

The message is not as bold as his lifelike sculpture of former MP Nick Smith defecating into a cupbut it is there, rallying against the commercialism of art.

Artists are able to talk about their work instead of being “someone with a doctorate” telling the public what it’s all about and only showing art that might sell, says- he.

READ MORE:
* Statue of the Minister for the Environment with his trousers down delivered to Canterbury Regional Council
* Canterbury artist Sam Mahon takes on Nick Smith again
* End of the ‘vigil’ outside the Environment Canterbury building
* Artist Sam Mahon installs protest sculpture at Environment Canterbury

One such piece is Anna Dalzell’s fishing net woven from linen, which reaches two stories from a wooden hairbrush. It was based on a story Dalzell heard from the Auckland Islands where a woman died alone on a shipwreck, Mahon said.

“It’s a story that is important to Anna, but she could never hope to sell it.”

The art wasn’t “just entertainment,” Mahon said.

“It’s part of the deal here.”

Femen by Rory McDougall, carved granite with a round bottom, symbolizes women in Ukraine who do not have status in the community.

Provided

Femen by Rory McDougall, carved granite with a round bottom, symbolizes women in Ukraine who do not have status in the community.

The exhibition will be held at Mahon’s home in Waikari between November 20 and December 12, featuring works by Ashley Smith, Matt Williams, Tim Main, Alison Erickson, Tony O’Grady, Rory McDougall, Anna Dalzell and Chris Reddington .

McDougall’s piece, titled Femen, symbolizes women in Ukraine with no “status in the community.”

The round-bottomed carved granite does not stand upright, and the fluids flowing from the granite represent “the cervix and the vulva and the seeds”.

Mahon said McDougall has created a “huge, powerful container” that cannot stand because “it’s in a community that doesn’t accept that these women have a voice.”

“Having him tell that story was such a cool thing.”

That’s what it was all about, says Mahon.

“Artists saying what they think art is and the reason for doing it – that’s the ‘why’ of art, and that’s important to me.”

Mahon has raised a few eyebrows in the past using her art to protest. In 2016, his bronze sculpture of conservationist Catherine Sitenie, who died in 2014 included a pointed critique from Environment Canterbury vice-chairman David Caygill.

Mahon has had controversial sculptures in the past, including a very large statue of Nick Smith defecating into a glass.

David Walker / Stuff

Mahon has had controversial sculptures in the past, including a very large statue of Nick Smith defecating into a glass.

In 2017, Mahon’s name became synonymous with Smith, now Mayor of Nelson, when he created a life-size sculpture of the then environment minister pooping in a glass, symbolizing his feelings about the freshwater management in Canterbury.

Unusually at its last exhibition, the artists’ works are commission-free, which means they will pocket the full price instead of demanding to give the exhibitor a discount.

Mahon said the commission was around 20%, but nowadays artists can expect to donate up to 50% of their earnings to the gallery.

“Artists are going through a pretty tough time, especially after the shutdowns.”

The exhibition Sculpture at The Mill Waikari runs from November 20 to December 12.

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A sculpture for peace in Scriba, a prayer for Ukraine | Oswego County https://momentodada.com/a-sculpture-for-peace-in-scriba-a-prayer-for-ukraine-oswego-county/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 05:15:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/a-sculpture-for-peace-in-scriba-a-prayer-for-ukraine-oswego-county/ SCRIBA – The tragedy and horror of war no longer appears to us only in the large, but seemingly distant photograph, or in the printed words of the war correspondent’s descriptions. It’s right in front of us, every day, every night on that night’s news and every morning on the Morning Joe TV show. There […]]]>

SCRIBA – The tragedy and horror of war no longer appears to us only in the large, but seemingly distant photograph, or in the printed words of the war correspondent’s descriptions. It’s right in front of us, every day, every night on that night’s news and every morning on the Morning Joe TV show. There are no more symbols of it all, no more anguished stares of the exhausted, dazed soldier looking nowhere with that thousand-yard stare, no more pyramid of heroes hoisting the American flag on a hill symbolizing a hard-won battle. We no longer rely on symbols when the harsh reality of the cruelty, destruction and terror of war appears from every angle on the screens of our pockets and the screens of our walls and spreads this surreal hell, almost amazing, down to the minute. the innocent victims of war suffer.

Only one symbol remains, the two fingers of Winston Churchill’s V for victory, transformed 20 years later into a universal sign of peace and love, a symbol that everyone knows, a symbol that says it all without saying a single word. .

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Explore the cosmos in Mississauga’s first permanent public sculpture by BIPOC artists https://momentodada.com/explore-the-cosmos-in-mississaugas-first-permanent-public-sculpture-by-bipoc-artists/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 20:46:37 +0000 https://momentodada.com/explore-the-cosmos-in-mississaugas-first-permanent-public-sculpture-by-bipoc-artists/ Preferred region How does this work? By Karen Longwell Published on November 8, 2022 at 3:46 p.m. Rendering of the city of Mississauga A new sculpture from Mississauga will offer a chance to explore the night sky through a multicultural lens. Rayyan: a cosmic bloom is described as “a dynamic gateway sculpture” that explores “the […]]]>


By

Published on November 8, 2022 at 3:46 p.m.

Rendering of the city of Mississauga

A new sculpture from Mississauga will offer a chance to explore the night sky through a multicultural lens.

Rayyan: a cosmic bloom is described as “a dynamic gateway sculpture” that explores “the cosmos through the language of sacred geometry”.

The perforated and illuminated aluminum sculpture will be installed in 535 Park, at the corner of Kariya Drive and Elm Drive West in Mississauga.

The piece is inspired by the name of the city, Mississauga, which comes from an Anishinaabe word meaning river with many mouths.

The public artwork will be Mississauga’s first permanent work by BIPOC artists, Quentin VerCetty of Malton and Toronto artist Javid JAH. The two have worked together in the past and wanted to create something for Mississauga.

“It is important for both of us to give visibility to our heritages, which are in the minority and often marginalized,” says JAH.

“So for Quentin, Afrofuturist images and representation of black communities and for me, Muslim communities, which implies a diversity of languages, ethnicities and cultures. But for both of us, it was important, especially in a city as diverse as Mississauga, that the permanent public art reflect the diverse communities.

rayyan cosmic flower

Quentin VerCetty, left, and Javid JAH create Rayyan: A Cosmic Bloom. Photo by Tylor Key-Carr

Growing up in Malton, VerCetty said there was a huge black and brown community.

“So I thought it would be more powerful not to be the only voice creating this piece. And so having Javid on that and bringing his lens to this piece. I really wanted it to be intentional to inspire as many people as possible,” says VerCetty.

They also consulted with indigenous peoples to incorporate their knowledge into the piece. The work explores cosmology and how it is shared by different traditions.

The shape is inspired by traditional Islamic arches with perforated flower shapes known as crystalline and adinkra (West African) symbols of the elements, fire, earth, air and water.

rayyan cosmic flower

The crystalline forms will be an oculus to the sky for the constellations. The forms will also be cast on the ground and around the arch. The walkway frames the way people interact with the sky and nature.

“The idea is that when people pass through this archway, they come in through this gateway into this park inspired, and leave, ideally, more inspired to be better people for the world,” says VerCetty.

The name of the room Rayyan is an Arabic word meaning bloom or gate of heaven. It was important for VerCetty and JAH to name the room with a word from a minority culture.

“We have just noticed that there are very few public works of art, in fact any space in the built environment, that permanently reflect a minority group of visible minority groups,” said JAH .

VerCetty created the first monument of a person of African descent in 2021 – called Moving forward in history – The Joshua Glover Memorial in Toronto. And Rayyan: a cosmic bloom is Mississauga’s first permanent artwork by black and brown artists, says VerCetty.

“We’re definitely bringing something that’s a first of its kind,” he says.

Coming from Malton, VerCetty hopes to bring more art like this to his home community. Malton is one of Mississauga communities lack permanent public art. This piece responded to a call from artists and the location, in downtown Mississauga, had already been chosen.

JAH and VerCetty plan to unveil the completed sculpture in October 2023.

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At the Galleries: Fall into art with sculpture, jewelry and contemporary works https://momentodada.com/at-the-galleries-fall-into-art-with-sculpture-jewelry-and-contemporary-works/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/at-the-galleries-fall-into-art-with-sculpture-jewelry-and-contemporary-works/ Victoria Galleries bring color and diverse media to the public this month. At the West End Gallery, Victorian artist Mary Ann Laing, inspired by the landscapes of Vancouver Island, offers her colorful and playful interpretations of beloved places. “My paintings speak of life. Ups and downs, light and dark, contrasts that complement each other, like […]]]>

Victoria Galleries bring color and diverse media to the public this month.

At the West End Gallery, Victorian artist Mary Ann Laing, inspired by the landscapes of Vancouver Island, offers her colorful and playful interpretations of beloved places.

“My paintings speak of life. Ups and downs, light and dark, contrasts that complement each other, like life. To resonate with the joys of knowing that darkness exists, to step forward to places that offer peace, I feel that’s what I’m saying through my brush,” she said.

Using oils, her color palette is a rich combination of complementary blues and oranges with the ubiquitous lush greens associated with the West Coast landscape. A signature member of the Federation of Canadian Artists, Laing’s work has been included in numerous exhibitions over the past 25 years.

“Most of my works concern places where I live or have lived. Ever since I started painting, I have been in constant awe of the beauty of sunlight dancing across the breathtaking landscapes of Vancouver Island. Fairfield’s neighborhoods offer endless subjects to paint, especially in the fall when colors range from deep hues to intense pure tones.

Laing’s Color of Life runs from November 19 to December 1. Visit westendgalleryltd.com for more details.

Avenue Gallery brings Brenda Roy, Becky Holuk and Marianne Meyer to its Oak Bay gallery this month.

Roy’s work explores contrasts of color and texture: smooth stone and polished metal highlighted by fused or roller-printed textures; the play of colors in unique stone inlays; precious stones and precious metals associated with raw minerals or broken pottery shards; and contemporary designs that resemble ancient artifacts.

“I like to play with the surprise of asymmetrical designs and unexpected material combinations. I believe that there is still a place for beautiful, well-made objects and that these objects enrich our lives. A piece of jewelry acquires meaning over time by developing associations with the stories of our lives, and these acquired meanings are as important to me as the artist’s original concepts,” she said.

As one of the few metalwork artists in the country to use stone inlay extensively in her work, she is constantly experimenting to find unexpected and non-traditional ways to incorporate stone into jewelry.

Holuk is a Calgary-based artist who works primarily with acrylic paint on canvas. She studied at the Alberta College of Art and Design, winning an Illingworth Kerr Award for her drawing and design skills. After working full-time in graphic design and illustration for 10 years, Holuk changed direction to focus solely on his passion for fine art painting.

Holuk considers it a blessing to be a part of the connection the artwork provides between artist and viewer and has found that hiking and walking through the majestic natural beauty of the foothills of Alberta, the Canadian Rockies and West Coast are favorite times to observe, record, and reflect for later artistic pursuits in the studio.

She sees each painting as an opportunity to form a joyful and grateful response in color and movement to what she has been privileged to experience in the natural world.

Meyer was born and raised in Switzerland, but has lived in British Columbia’s Okanagan Valley for over 20 years. His abstract and spontaneous paintings allow him to freely express his emotions and experiment.

“My finished abstract works look nothing like the first layer – or the second. I’m always ready for anything, in terms of color and shape. Take risks – I don’t hesitate,” Meyer said.

Visit theavenuegallery.com for details.

Madrona Gallery presents Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas’ first solo exhibition in Victoria this month.

Challenging stereotypes of Northwest Coast art, Yahgulanaas presents current issues in a way that bridges the gap between artwork and viewer. In this way, Yahgulanaas allows everyone to explore different ways of thinking and to challenge established narratives that have long dominated Western discourse.

An internationally acclaimed contemporary artist, author and professional speaker, Yahgulanaas has developed a unique visual vocabulary to present contemporary social, political and environmental issues to a wider audience.

Yahgulanaas’ work has been exhibited internationally, with works from his acclaimed Coppers from the Hood series housed in major public institutions, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the British Museum in London. More recently, Yahgulanaas completed an eight square meter mural commissioned by the Humboldt Forum in Berlin.

Yahgulanaas can’t wait to attend the opening of his solo exhibition at Madrona Gallery.

“I have many friends in Victoria since teaching at the University of Victoria and working with Pacific Opera,” he said. The exhibition features 15 recent works of art in a variety of sizes, mediums and styles, as well as four impressive brass instruments.

The exhibition runs from November 5 to 18 with an opening with the artist on November 5 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Visit madronagallery.com for more details.


Do you have a tip for the story? Email: christine.vanreeuwyk@blackpress.ca.

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New sculpture in Newcastle Cathedral https://momentodada.com/new-sculpture-in-newcastle-cathedral/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 08:59:50 +0000 https://momentodada.com/new-sculpture-in-newcastle-cathedral/ A new sculpture designed to show Jesus’ legacy of love and sacrifice is the latest artwork to be displayed in Newcastle Cathedral – part of a series of works of art to reflect its rich heritage and history. New sculpture in Newcastle Cathedral tells of Jesus’ legacy of love and sacrifice Legacy, by Artist Roberta […]]]>

A new sculpture designed to show Jesus’ legacy of love and sacrifice is the latest artwork to be displayed in Newcastle Cathedral – part of a series of works of art to reflect its rich heritage and history.

New sculpture in Newcastle Cathedral tells of Jesus’ legacy of love and sacrifice

Legacy, by Artist Roberta Fulford, is crafted from 150 yards of walnut veneer and depicts the transformative moment on the cross where Jesus became unlimited energy flowing into the world.

And for Roberta, who completed her arts degree at Northumbria University in Newcastle before moving to one of the outer islands of Shetland, this piece also represents a kind of homecoming.

She was drawn to creating a piece for the cathedral after attending an event there and was therefore delighted when she was asked to share more of her initial ideas.

She says:

“I felt incredibly moved and honored to have this opportunity. It is without a doubt the most wonderful thing in my creative life so far, especially because of the beautiful and caring environment.

“The trust that the team placed in me to create the work in situ was an honor and I was determined to try to meet their expectations. I hope the work will connect with visitors to the cathedral and perhaps elicit a personal emotional response to enrich their experience in this beautiful spiritual place.

Legacy can be found on display above the entrance to the Chapel Arch of Newcastle’s Medieval Crypt and is the latest in a series of exhibits and installations that respond to the rich history of the Newcastle Cathedral.

Newcastle Cathedral closed in January 2020 and reopened in August 2021 following a £6million project by the National Lottery Heritage Fund, Common Ground in Sacred Space which significantly transformed the nave, redesigned its outdoor space for greater public engagement and introduced new audiovisual heritage presentations.

Since its reopening, the cathedral has welcomed a wide range of bespoke commissions and existing works of art and the cathedral is committed to continuing this tradition.

Lindy Gilliland, project manager of Common Ground in Sacred Space said:

“Cathedrals are intriguing and exciting spaces for artists to create and display their work.

“The nature of these spaces makes them ideally suited to exploring themes and topics related to faith, heritage and today’s society.”

“We look forward to building relationships with artists whose work truly resonates with our values, our historic place and our urban context.”

Legacy will be visible until the end of December.

A temporary exhibition, Hidden Stories: We Are the Pelicans runs until Monday 28 November and was created by Newcastle print and pattern designer Shiori Naruse alongside a group of women who accessed the services provided by Changing Lives.

Other exhibits have included We depend on our words celebrate the diversity of LGBTQ+ people with ties to the cathedral, Light’, a showcase of the works of the Northern Potters Association, and What is a Safe Space? created by people who experienced homelessness while living in the Northeast.

Sarah Troughton’s “Transformation” aired in May and depicted the phases of transformation experienced by survivors as a result of church-related abuse.

Exhibits have also included “A Century of Wedding Dresses”, and. Friday 2 December will see the launch of ‘From St Nicholas to Santa Claus’, an exploration of the evolving identity of the cathedral’s patron saint.

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A nod to the past, an education for the future https://momentodada.com/a-nod-to-the-past-an-education-for-the-future/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 15:03:42 +0000 https://momentodada.com/a-nod-to-the-past-an-education-for-the-future/ By Kris Leonhardt AMHERST JUNCTION — A sculpture installed Oct. 22 at Lake Emily County Park, nods to the park’s legendary Indigenous heritage while providing an educational moment for those who visit the site. Mark Fisher, left, and his son, Kyle, install the sculpture in Lake Emily County Park. Photo by Kris Leonhardt In the […]]]>

By Kris Leonhardt

AMHERST JUNCTION — A sculpture installed Oct. 22 at Lake Emily County Park, nods to the park’s legendary Indigenous heritage while providing an educational moment for those who visit the site.

Mark Fisher, left, and his son, Kyle, install the sculpture in Lake Emily County Park. Photo by Kris Leonhardt

In the 1880s, 24 Native American burial mounds were mapped around the lake. Wisconsin is also home to more burial mounds than any state in the country. These sites are made up of intentional landscape features that are not fully understood by archaeologists.

“So what’s fascinating is understanding that there’s art created by indigenous people that goes back thousands of years and is in the landscape, and today we’re here to see this wonderful new piece to add to this wonderful story of Native American artwork on the landscape itself,” Rob Nurre, president of the Wisconsin Archaeological Society
“About 100 years ago, the Wisconsin Archaeological Society placed many brass plaques on effigy mounds and other native sites, and they help people understand that those places were important. There’s something inappropriate today; I sort of derisively called them the “Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval” for Native American sites. And we’re actually working on replacing a lot of them with things like this that tell the story so much better, and that I will certainly use in my work with our organization as an example of what we should be doing today.

Ryan Rose, Portage County Parks Superintendent
Portage County Parks Superintendent Ryan Rose speaks during the installation of the sculpture. Photo by Kris Leonhardt

UWSP Professor Emeritus of Archeology Ray Reser and Karen Ann Hoffman of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin were instrumental in helping the Portage County Park Commission present the educational piece,

“I served on the park commission and Karen Ann and I participated in burials at UWSP. Then we researched where else in the county we could do something that would recognize or acknowledge the Native American presence and deep past .The whole lake here at Lake Emily is completely lined with village sites and burial mounds.There are dance circles to the west on private land…” Reser explained.

“We thought, if we were going to do something on county land and county park, where is the most accessible place to do it. So we sort of settled on Lake Emily, because the road to the lake goes through here. It’s easy to install something here; it is easy to see it from the road. It’s right in the middle of a Native American site, but it also doesn’t encroach on any Native American burial mounds, which are protected by state law.

“It also sends the message that Native Americans are still there in the landscape and that it was a truly sacred place, just as it is for all of us who use it as a park.

UWSP Emeritus Professor of Archeology Ray Reser
UWSP Professor Emeritus of Archeology Ray Reser points out burial sites in Lake Emily County Park. Photo by Kris Leonhardt

“Karen Ann worked hard and raised a lot of the money; CREATE Portage County donated money for this. Thus, we were able to move forward with the project; it doesn’t cost the county much. They bought a rock and had it placed. So a number of different partners. It came together and it came together in a great way.

Karen Ann Hoffman explained the importance of the sculpture and its creator.

“My elders always say: ‘Be attentive and grateful to the teachers who come to us.’ You know, these teachers come in many forms. We say sometimes the teacher is just a worm or a blade of grass because you can learn,” she said.
“Today I am aware and I am grateful that there are teachers in the world who are artists, artists who take their hearts, take their history, their cultures, take their craft and create things for us and help us to be aware and grateful and aware, and remember our responsibilities in our original instructions.We are caring and grateful to the artists and all the teachings they leave behind.

The artist and the sculpture

Mark Fisher has been a celebrated artist for over two decades and a member of Green Bay’s Oneida Nation, Turtle Clan.

Fisher worked in Native American education at the administrative level and was instrumental in establishing several Native American scholarships.

He says many of his designs are “inspired by ancient woodland petroglyphs and pictographs celebrating nature, gender, and Indigenous art and culture.”

Karen Ann Hoffman
Karen Ann Hoffman shows her appreciation to the sculpture for her work on the reflective piece. Photo by Kris Leonhardt

“Sculpture is ‘The Sustainers’, a very important part of our culture. The Sustainers are the ‘Three Sisters’, that’s what they’re called. And the way we teach about them in our school system is that the names of the Three Sisters are corn, beans, and squash,” Fisher explained.
“The corn comes up, big strong corn – she’s a strong girl – then the beans wrap around the corn and grow taller. And then the squash covers the ground with giant leaves and protects the ground from moisture loss. So the Three Sisters are part of our group all the time.
“And then on our three sisters, there are no faces. And, the reason there are no faces, our community – Oneida Nation of Green Bay – believes that we all have a job to do. Don’t stand in front of a mirror. And it used to be to stand above the water and look at yourself.
“And do, no face on any of our dolls, on any of our cornhusk dolls and none of our play toys have faces on them. And that’s just to represent, we’re hard workers and we get the job done. I’m very proud of that.

“I am so honored that the parks system had this sculpture built by a Native American. The sculpture was blessed several times during its construction, which is fitting, to carry a spirit of its own and hopefully be able to protect itself.

Lake Emily Park, a 143-acre park adjacent to the 96-acre Lake Emily, is located just west of Amherst Junction.

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€200,000 for a sculpture in a remote and uninhabited area of ​​Gozo https://momentodada.com/e200000-for-a-sculpture-in-a-remote-and-uninhabited-area-of-gozo/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 08:56:18 +0000 https://momentodada.com/e200000-for-a-sculpture-in-a-remote-and-uninhabited-area-of-gozo/ New The remote area of ​​Xwejni where the Gozo minister intends to place the new €200,000 statue The government intends to spend over €200,000 for a Gozitan artist to produce a new, as yet unidentified sculpture and place it in one of the most remote areas of Gozo, away from the foreshore and next to […]]]>

The government intends to spend over €200,000 for a Gozitan artist to produce a new, as yet unidentified sculpture and place it in one of the most remote areas of Gozo, away from the foreshore and next to historical and still productive saltworks.

The owners of the saltworks, who live off the region, opposed the prospect. They claim the area is their private property and not public land and the art installation will bring more visitors to the area which will disrupt the salt flats and their livelihoods.

The Shift is informed that through a planning application submitted last August by the permanent secretary of the Gozo Ministry, John Borg, planning permission has been sought to install “a public sculpture along the coast” on Triq Is-Sagħtrija on the outskirts of Żebbuġ.

The area, better known as Xwejni, is one of the few remaining untouched areas on the island, usually frequented only by salt marsh owners and a few divers.

When asked to explain why the ministry chose a remote area in the middle of nowhere to install such an expensive sculpture, Borg did not answer. He also did not respond to questions about what the sculpture will depict, who chose the remote area for its installation, and who in the ministry decided to spend those funds on the sculpture.

The Shift can report that the commission for the sculpture was awarded to renowned Gozitan artist Austin Camilleri in 2021 via a negotiated procedure – a form of direct commission – for the sum of €209,000. It’s still unclear if the fee is all-inclusive, covering the mounting of the statue, or if it’s just Camilleri’s work.

Gozitan artist Austin Camilleri

When contacted, the artist confirmed he had been selected by the Gozo ministry to produce an art installation, but he did not divulge any details about what he was about or why the remote location was chosen.

Insisting that it would not be a monument, Camilleri told The Shift that the installation would not commemorate any event or person.

“It’s an award-winning public sculpture after a public call in 2021, and like most of my sculptures, it’s site-specific,” Camilleri told The Shift. “The site is important for the works, and it should be installed in the second half of 2023.”

Asked about claims that the area in question is privately owned, Camilleri told The Shift that “the Lands Authority has confirmed that the site is government owned and not leased.”

Questions sent to the Lands Authority went unanswered.

The uninhabited area of ​​Xwejni where the sculpture will be located

It is not the first time that substantial public funds have been used by Gozo Minister Clint Camilleri to award jobs to his constituents.

As well as recently awarding €166,000 to Gozitan artist Vincent Caruana for a large bronze sculpture at Mġarr Marina, he has also paid €350,000 in direct commissions to various companies for the installation of a large statue of Saint Francis of Assisi outside his ministerial offices in Victoria.

The monument – dedicated to a saint associated with poverty – was unveiled in the presence of Prime Minister Robert Abela at a major party for Camilleri voters in the summer of 2021 and was funded by various direct commissions.

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