Sculpture – Momento Dada http://momentodada.com/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 12:57:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://momentodada.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T222814.835-150x150.png Sculpture – Momento Dada http://momentodada.com/ 32 32 Take your pick: an apple orchard turned into a sculpture garden and other places to see outdoor art this fall https://momentodada.com/take-your-pick-an-apple-orchard-turned-into-a-sculpture-garden-and-other-places-to-see-outdoor-art-this-fall/ https://momentodada.com/take-your-pick-an-apple-orchard-turned-into-a-sculpture-garden-and-other-places-to-see-outdoor-art-this-fall/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 12:57:30 +0000 https://momentodada.com/take-your-pick-an-apple-orchard-turned-into-a-sculpture-garden-and-other-places-to-see-outdoor-art-this-fall/ The large red frame turns visitors and the orchard itself into an art. This was the idea of ​​Park Hill Orchard owner Russell Braen at the very beginning of the show, which began in 2011. Jean-Pierre Pasche, a member of the orchard’s board of directors, hired a friend to build it. “We didn’t expect it […]]]>

The large red frame turns visitors and the orchard itself into an art. This was the idea of ​​Park Hill Orchard owner Russell Braen at the very beginning of the show, which began in 2011. Jean-Pierre Pasche, a member of the orchard’s board of directors, hired a friend to build it.

“We didn’t expect it to be that big,” Pasche said. “Even the locals saw their own garden in a whole different way.”

Rebecca Fiszer saw Mount Tom through Big Red Frame along the ‘Art in the Orchard 2021’ sculpture trail at Park Hill Orchard in Easthampton.Jonathan Wiggs / Globe Staff

The carefully installed open-air exhibitions benefit from a natural environment; the contrast of nature and culture makes everyone softer. At “Art in the Orchard”, “Hoo Goes There? Dave Rothstein looms out of the landscape like a Dr. Seuss creature. Look closely and you will find a family of owls made from hay.

Nearby, Daina Shobrys’ ‘Geranium’ transforms the humblest of flowers into a giant voluptuous rose flower in nylon flag fabric. It is lounging and swaying, casting shadows on the grass like any flower at the edge of the garden. Visitors to the orchard are invited to download the Otocast application for an audio tour of the exhibition. “I don’t really think geranium is the favorite flower of anyone who actually loves flowers,” Shobrys says in his recording.

Daina shobrys "Geranium" To "Art in the Orchard 2021" sculpture trail.
“Geranium” by Daina Shobrys at the “Art in the Orchard 2021” sculpture trail.Jonathan Wiggs / Globe Staff

“Art in the Orchard” offers a range of works, abstract, fanciful and conceptual. Other shows this fall highlight particular mediums or themes, such as fireflies. In “ALight on Mars – A Nocturnal Exhibition” at Manship Artist Residency + Studios in Gloucester, artists from the Boston Sculptors Gallery offer luminous reflections on insects, climate change and the night sky.

This nighttime show requires reservations. He also calls for caution. The place – the former home and studio of Art Deco sculptor Paul Manship – sits next to two quarries. Anyone, child or adult, prone to wandering must be kept in custody.

But it’s hard to think of a more magical theme in a place called Manship called Starfield.

“Originally we thought it had to do with her love of the night sky,” MARS executive director Rebecca Reynolds said of the name. “Then his granddaughter told us he didn’t mow his lawn until the end of July. He knew that if he mowed it earlier, the fireflies wouldn’t be able to go through their life cycle.

At Leslie Wilcox "HIGHLIGHTS" at the Boston Sculptors Gallery's "ALight on MARCH" exhibition at Manship Artists Residency + Studios in Gloucester.
“HIGHLIGHTERS” by Leslie Wilcox at the Boston Sculptors Gallery’s “Alight on MARS” exhibition at Manship Artists Residency + Studios in Gloucester.Courtesy of the Boston Sculptors Gallery

Leslie Wilcox’s giant fireflies, “HIGHLIGHTERS”, make a blinking mating call. Nancy Selvage’s dazzling abstract pink touch, “Maenad,” echoes a Manship sculpture of the same name. Ellen Schön’s “Gathered Glow”, a series of ceramic lanterns, drifts and shines along a tree overlooking the quarry.

that of Ellen Schön "Glow gathered" at the Boston Sculptors Gallery's "ALight on MARCH" exhibition at Manship Artists Residency + Studios in Gloucester.
Ellen Schön’s “Gathered Glow” at the Boston Sculptors Gallery’s “ALight on MARS” exhibition at the Manship Artists Residency + Studios in Gloucester.Courtesy of the Boston Sculptors Gallery

There’s an added bonus, unrelated to fireflies: MARS has an augmented reality piece by Will Pappenheimer and choreographer Sarah Slifer Swift, “Starry Interpose”.

Screen-oriented art enthusiasts will also enjoy “Seeing the Invisible,” an exhibition of augmented reality art by internationally renowned artists in a dozen botanical gardens around the world this fall, including the Gardens of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society at Elm Bank in Wellesley.

Fantasy AR can bend the space or draw viewers to places that literally don’t exist, at least not on the spot.

Chinese art star Ai Weiwei’s “Gilded Cage AR”, a giant golden bird cage, exists in real life at Blenheim Palace in Oxfordshire, England. At Elm Bank, its AR version is in a sheltered area but rises high, and visitors can use their devices to walk inside. The artist said the work comments on fences and borders, but a golden cage is also a metaphor for on-screen reality, and Ai invites us directly.

Ai WeiWei's "Golden cage AR," 2021, in the gardens of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society at Elm Bank in Wellesley.
“Gilded Cage AR” by Ai WeiWei, 2021, in the gardens of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society at Elm Bank in Wellesley.Courtesy of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society

On a more human scale, the “Morphecore Prototype AR” by Japanese artist Daito Manabe features a dancing figure in the garden. Each gesture is mapped from an impulse of the artist’s own brain waves, and the figure contorts in a way that no human can. Many of Elm Bank’s works invite interaction: you can photograph your children dancing with Manabe’s performer, or when you get close enough to touch “Forget Me Not” by Ori Gersht, a serene still life by a bouquet suddenly explodes. If kids tire of the screen, Weezie’s Garden for Children offers spiral paths and a tower to climb.

that of Ori Gersht "Do not forget me," 2021, in the gardens of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society at Elm Bank in Wellesley.
“Forget Me Not” by Ori Gersht, 2021, in the gardens of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society at Elm Bank in Wellesley.Courtesy of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society

The most rigorous outdoor art exhibit, in terms of exercise, is “Climbing the Holy Hill” from Hancock Shaker Village, a 2.6 mile moderate to strenuous (round trip) hike with sound art, following a village trail to Pittsfield State Forest, along a path the Shakers used twice a year for worship service.

“Three hundred of them would walk four abreast, carrying seniors and children,” said Jennifer Trainer Thompson, director and CEO of Hancock Shaker Village. “When they reached the top, they worshiped ecstatically all day.”

A drawing by Allison Smith works as a spiritual, genealogical, and historical map, and the trail provides site-specific sound, which you can listen to on your phone. Our Indigenous daughters (Rhiannon Giddens, Amythyst Kiah, Leyla McCalla and Allison Russell) sing anti-slavery songs about resistance and hope. Composer Brad Wells draws inspiration from Shaker songs and testimonies in a sung and spoken piece performed by Roomful of Teeth.

Once hikers have commune with the Shakers climbing Holy Hill, they can continue along the trail and enjoy nature’s original art installations.

ART IN THE ORCHARD 2021

At Park Hill Orchard, 82 Park Hill Road, Easthampton, until November 28. www.parkhillorchard.com/art

ALIGHT ON MARS – A NIGHT EXHIBITION

At Manship Artists Residency + Studios, 10 Leverett St., Gloucester, open weekends, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., until November 7. Advance tickets required. www.manshipartistes.org

SEE THE INVISIBLE

At Gardens at Elm Bank, Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 900 Washington St., Wellesley, until October 31, and again next spring, www.masshort.org/seeing-the-invisible

CLIMBING OF THE HOLY HILL

At Hancock Shaker Village, 1483 West Housatonic St., Pittsfield, until December 1st. www.hancockshakervillage.org/exhibitions/climbing-the-holy-hill

Girls walking the Shaker Trail, starting their ascent to Holy Hill.
Girls walking the Shaker Trail, starting their ascent to Holy Hill.Courtesy of Hancock Shaker Village

Haven’t seen enough? Here are more outdoor art opportunities this fall:

North Berkshire art outdoors is a 16 km self-guided walking and cycling tour along country roads organized by the Mass MoCA, the Clark Art Institute and the Williams College Museum of Art. Start at Mass MoCA, 1040 Mass MoCA Way, North Adams. www.massmoca.org/event/northern-berkshire-art-outside

The Cordova Sculpture Park and Museum has nearly 60 sculptures exhibited, including works by Andy Goldsworthy, Ursula von Rydingsvard, and Jeffrey Gibson. Cordova Park and Sculpture Museum, 51 Sandy Pond Road, Lincoln. www.thetrustees.org/content/decordovasculpturepark

“Follywoods: Awe-inspiring Wee Faerie Architecture along the Artists’ Trail” presents ornamental dwellings of fairy size based on 18th and 19th century architecture. Until October 31. Florence Griswold Museum, 96 Lyme St., Old Lyme, Connecticut. www.florencegriswoldmuseum.org/wfv2021

“Land / work” The Clark Art Institute’s first outdoor art exhibit features six site-specific works of art scattered across the museum’s 140-acre pastoral campus, by artists such as Nairy Baghramian and Haegue Yang. Until October 17. Clark Art Institute, 225 South St., Williamstown. www.clarkart.edu/microsites/ground-work/exhibition

CATE McQUAID


Cate McQuaid can be contacted at catemcquaid@gmail.com. Follow her on Twitter @cmcq.



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Giant racism sculpture could arrive in Port Moody https://momentodada.com/giant-racism-sculpture-could-arrive-in-port-moody/ https://momentodada.com/giant-racism-sculpture-could-arrive-in-port-moody/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 00:16:02 +0000 https://momentodada.com/giant-racism-sculpture-could-arrive-in-port-moody/ A Vancouver filmmaker and sculptor proposes to present a unique piece of public art that addresses the issue of racism in Port Moody. They just need a place to set it up. A giant pair of concrete hands – one black, one white – clutching a mirrored cell phone could become a tourist attraction for […]]]>

A Vancouver filmmaker and sculptor proposes to present a unique piece of public art that addresses the issue of racism in Port Moody. They just need a place to set it up.

A giant pair of concrete hands – one black, one white – clutching a mirrored cell phone could become a tourist attraction for Port Moody, as self-portraits with the sculpture are shared on the internet.

One of the artists involved in the project is also hoping it will spark conversations about racism.

But whether the 3.7m long by 2m high structure finds a place in the city, or where it could be located, will be discussed at a future council meeting.

On Tuesday, the full council committee voted to forward Vancouver filmmaker Mustafa Keshvari and sculptor Parvenah Roudgar’s public art proposal to one of its regular meetings for further consideration.

Keshvari, whose film projects often explore social themes and issues such as climate change, told advisers he wanted to create something that is more inviting for interaction and gives people the opportunity to reflect on a anti-racist message. Working with Roudgar, whose outdoor sculptures are permanently placed in cities around the world – including one called “Mother and Child on Bikes” at Inlet SkyTrain station – they designed the Giant Hands.

The oversized mirror cell phone they grab, he said, reflects society’s obsession with social media while also inviting people to see their own reaction to the artwork.

“While people take a photo of the sculpture, the sculpture also takes a photo of them,” Keshvari said.

The biracial nature of the hands, along with the beaded metal bracelets around each wrist, with the word “Unity” engraved in multiple languages ​​on each bead, sends a message of racial harmony, he added.

“We are all in the same boat, we are all part of the same family.”

Keshvari said he was working with local conservator Fred Soofi to secure funding to build the sculpture at no cost to the city. He just needs a place to put it.

And although he said he has had preliminary discussions with the City of Vancouver, he would like to see him in Port Moody as he moves to the city in November and that could further bolster his reputation as a “City of the Arts” at one. wider audience.

“There is a lot of abstract art in Port Moody, but we need something that is more relevant to current issues,” he said. “We also need to create some kind of tourism. “

Com. Zoe Royer, who is also chair of the arts committee at Port Moody’s, said she would love to see the sculpture located in Rocky Point Park, where visitors to the popular waterfront destination are sure to congregate and to interact with it.

“It will stop people in their tracks,” she said. “It will be captured on many platforms and people will be talking about the conversations we want them to have.”

Com. Amy Lubik suggested that placing the sculpture somewhere along historic Clarke Street or in Queen Street Square would help bring people to those parts of town.

But Con. Hunter Madsen, who brought forward the motion to bring Keshvari’s proposal to a future council meeting, questioned whether a sculpture goes far enough to solve a significant problem like racism.

“I am not convinced that making this symbolic gesture would make our community less racist,” he said. “It makes us think we got it.”

Madsen said all city funds used to install the sculpture could be better spent bringing in speakers and thought leaders, or creating projects with local First Nations.

Keshvari said he envisions the back of the mirrored cell phone being decorated by a First Nations artist and the sculpture could reach far more people than a series of lectures or workshops.

“Art speaks louder,” he says. “Sometimes, through art, we find ourselves. We can create something that allows people to draw their own conclusions.


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WAKE sculpture not moving? The plans for the Thomas Wolfe cabin? https://momentodada.com/wake-sculpture-not-moving-the-plans-for-the-thomas-wolfe-cabin/ https://momentodada.com/wake-sculpture-not-moving-the-plans-for-the-thomas-wolfe-cabin/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 10:07:21 +0000 https://momentodada.com/wake-sculpture-not-moving-the-plans-for-the-thomas-wolfe-cabin/ Today’s bundle of burning questions, my smart answers, and the real deal: Question: I often walk past the large WAKE sculpture at the corner of Millard and Collier avenues on the south side near downtown. I know it’s a kinetic sculpture; but although there are signs inviting visitors to “interact” with the sculpture and it […]]]>

Today’s bundle of burning questions, my smart answers, and the real deal:

Question: I often walk past the large WAKE sculpture at the corner of Millard and Collier avenues on the south side near downtown. I know it’s a kinetic sculpture; but although there are signs inviting visitors to “interact” with the sculpture and it appears to be hooked up to solar panels, I have never been able to find a button or a way to make it move. Isn’t it more kinetic?

My answer: “Kinetic No More” would be a good name for a non-interactive sculpture of me.

real answer: Well, it looks like the sculpture is moving, in a way.

“Tuesday (September 28) was actually the last day to uninstall WAKE,” UNC Asheville spokesperson Sarah Broberg said via email.


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No hugs just yet – Public art leaders hope vandalism isn’t the cause of Founders Park sculpture’s downfall – WJHL https://momentodada.com/no-hugs-just-yet-public-art-leaders-hope-vandalism-isnt-the-cause-of-founders-park-sculptures-downfall-wjhl/ https://momentodada.com/no-hugs-just-yet-public-art-leaders-hope-vandalism-isnt-the-cause-of-founders-park-sculptures-downfall-wjhl/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 23:25:20 +0000 https://momentodada.com/no-hugs-just-yet-public-art-leaders-hope-vandalism-isnt-the-cause-of-founders-park-sculptures-downfall-wjhl/ Boones Creek developer, state disagree over release of tenant names New / 34 minutes ago Video Bluff City and Piney Flats water cut is scheduled for Friday New / 38 minutes ago Video No hugs just yet – Public art leaders hope vandalism isn’t the cause of Founders Park sculpture’s downfall New / 40 minutes […]]]>

Boones Creek developer, state disagree over release of tenant names

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Bluff City and Piney Flats water cut is scheduled for Friday

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No hugs just yet – Public art leaders hope vandalism isn’t the cause of Founders Park sculpture’s downfall

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Russell County Receives Over $ 2.5 Million In Grants For Drinking Water Projects

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Kinetic Synth-Kebab Sculpture plays punk sequentially https://momentodada.com/kinetic-synth-kebab-sculpture-plays-punk-sequentially/ https://momentodada.com/kinetic-synth-kebab-sculpture-plays-punk-sequentially/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/kinetic-synth-kebab-sculpture-plays-punk-sequentially/ What’s better than an Atari Punk Console synthesizer? What would you say four Synthesizers Atari Punk Console. And what better way to present them than art sculptures made of brass wire. we would have forgiven [iSax] if he had stopped at four copper wire synths, but he took things to another level with his kinetic […]]]>

What’s better than an Atari Punk Console synthesizer? What would you say four Synthesizers Atari Punk Console. And what better way to present them than art sculptures made of brass wire. we would have forgiven [iSax] if he had stopped at four copper wire synths, but he took things to another level with his kinetic sculpture which doubles as a mechanical sequencer. Called Cyclotone – The mechanical punk console sequencer, it features wood, brass, brushes, and 555 timers. You can see the demonstration in the video below the break.

If you are not familiar with the Atari Punk console, this is a circuit first described as a “sound synthesizer” in Forest Mims’ “Engineer’s Notebook: Integrated Circuit Applications” first released. in 1980. It used two 555 timers in a single chip, the 556. Later dubbed “Atari Punk Console”, the circuit has stood the test of time and is still very popular among hackers of all kinds.

[iSax]The construction of adds an element of sequencing that allows synths to be played automatically. The synthesizers are spit 90 degrees to each other on a square peg, which is rotated at variable speed by a stepping motor controlled by a button at the base of the sculpture.

On either side of each synth is a switch that makes contact with scavenged rotating tool brushes that deliver power through the hexagonal brass brackets. Each synth retains its own speaker and controls, and has its own segmented number displayed with discrete LEDs that light up when each synth is played.

We applaud [iSax] for a well-executed and imaginative build that successfully combines circuit sculpting, kinetic sculpting, classic electronics, and even flashing lights. If you enjoyed this version, you should also take a look at a free version of the Atari Punk console and one integrated into a joystick. If you come across a project of any kind that interests you, please let us know via the Tip Line!


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A manufacturer in demand for poetic and quirky furniture https://momentodada.com/a-manufacturer-in-demand-for-poetic-and-quirky-furniture/ https://momentodada.com/a-manufacturer-in-demand-for-poetic-and-quirky-furniture/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 09:02:52 +0000 https://momentodada.com/a-manufacturer-in-demand-for-poetic-and-quirky-furniture/ Maybe Kim’s sense of insecurity owes something to the fact that he’s an immigrant. He grew up in Seoul, where his parents still live; her father is a minister of Won Buddhism, a twentieth-century Korean reform variant of religion, and her mother is an artist and teacher. As a teenager, Kim still drew and, when […]]]>

Maybe Kim’s sense of insecurity owes something to the fact that he’s an immigrant. He grew up in Seoul, where his parents still live; her father is a minister of Won Buddhism, a twentieth-century Korean reform variant of religion, and her mother is an artist and teacher. As a teenager, Kim still drew and, when he arrived at Washington University, he opted for a double major in architecture and painting and drawing – a split between practicality and creativity. He followed that up with a master’s degree in architecture from Columbia, and soon after graduating he landed the job with Giancarlo Valle.

But the transition from an academic setting to a commercial setting was a somewhat rude wake-up call. “[In academia] it was seeing everything in the world through the prism of architecture and design as a solution, which is a very idealistic approach, ”says Kim. “You had to justify every decision. In a commercial studio, on the other hand, “it becomes a matter of financial considerations, so if you want to make something interesting, you have to sell it.” And he was annoyed at the icy pace of architectural projects in a large corporation: “When I have an idea, I can’t wait to see it, so I kind of rush to it.

The pandemic would offer Kim an opening to develop his own practice, which has continued to evolve. He had been painting seriously since college, but after moving to an apartment with a studio in the basement, he began to experiment with furniture design. With his office hours necessarily shortened, he was spending more time in his studio, making more substantial pieces and posting them on Instagram. His first clients were friends, then friends of friends until, finally, strangers approached him on commissions. Last summer, barely a year after starting to make furniture in earnest, he made a solo installation at the Marta Gallery in Los Angeles, designing an entire room and exhibiting two of his most whimsical pieces: the Freud chair, in the form of the seat of the famous psychoanalyst; and the Matisse desk, with its characteristic voluptuous frame inspired by the shapes of the famous cut-out works of the French artist.

After renting her current studio to create a piece for Marta’s show, Kim knew something had to give; he just didn’t have enough time to work at Giancarlo Valle and keep up with all the orders for his own designs. So he decided to take the plunge and quit his job. The decision may sound reckless, but in Kim’s account there is a method to her inspired madness, a feeling that the wheel ends up coming full circle: “If I can create my own voice on a smaller scale, my thinking is that eventually I should be able to return to architecture and a spatial practice.

So far, the smaller scale is paying off. In addition to her lyrical lamps, Kim has created a series of rough, subtly asymmetrical wooden benches and eccentrically charming bunny-ear fiberglass chairs. Regardless of the material, Kim considers each piece to be a unique work of art – when he works with wood, “they’re all kinds of sculptures in a way because I sculpt them”, and with the fiberglass pieces , “There is no mold that allows me to repeat the shape; every time I build them, they’ll come out differently.

Kim admits he found himself in an unfamiliar place: with time and space at his disposal. Previously, he felt that he had no margin for error when it came to making a work, and his creative spontaneity suffered as a result. “I drew a lot more and spent a lot of time developing something,” he says. Now, “I have the space and the gear sitting down, so I can just go.” He also sees his new expansive relationship to time reflected in his work, something that can be felt in the pieces themselves. “Every grain of time that went into making [of an object], I want to be able to show it, ”he says. “When people talk about patina, you see layers of weather. This is how you can have a conversation with an object: you can ask for its story and it can respond to you in a certain way.

Naz Riahi contributed reporting.



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East Greenbush sculptor breathes new life into scrap iron and steel https://momentodada.com/east-greenbush-sculptor-breathes-new-life-into-scrap-iron-and-steel/ https://momentodada.com/east-greenbush-sculptor-breathes-new-life-into-scrap-iron-and-steel/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 14:04:58 +0000 https://momentodada.com/east-greenbush-sculptor-breathes-new-life-into-scrap-iron-and-steel/ It was just a part-time job that started in high school, but organizing merchandise at Averill Park variety store helped Mary Pat Wager find her way as an artist. Over 40 years later, she still arranges things, mostly thrown iron and steel objects, and turns them into sculptures. The works can be elaborate and imposing […]]]>

It was just a part-time job that started in high school, but organizing merchandise at Averill Park variety store helped Mary Pat Wager find her way as an artist. Over 40 years later, she still arranges things, mostly thrown iron and steel objects, and turns them into sculptures. The works can be elaborate and imposing or intimate and alluring and they have been exhibited in countless galleries across the region. Currently, Wager is represented in the 2021 Hudson Mohawk Regional at the Albany International Airport Gallery, on view through November 8, and she also has an exhibition at the Clement Frame Shop and Art Gallery in downtown Troy until late. October.

When Wager took on this job as a teenager, it wasn’t to create big Lord & Taylor-style showcases. It was an old-fashioned general store located at a major crossroads in his hometown. She was a cashier and was also responsible for organizing the housewares department of functional items such as can openers and oil lamps. Organizing disparate utility objects in a way that elicits new associations and new ideas is a formula that still works for her.

There were other episodes in Wager’s youth where the method prevailed. Sometime after the death of her maternal grandmother, extended family members took turns visiting the large colonial-style property in West Stephentown to share furniture and heirlooms. First the seven children, then all the grandchildren. By the time young Pat arrived, the most desirable things were long gone. She found a few more treasures: buttons and yarn, a single glove, knitting needles and a few small Christmas decorations.

When Wager made a shadow box from instants in Grandma’s house, her personal memories were preserved and entrenched. In addition, the grouped objects were allowed to receive new life and new meaning from subsequent viewers.

This is how Wager likes his mature sculptures to land on people, equally pleasing to the eye but devoid of a personal narrative. “Any material I can get my hands on has some meaning to me. But I’m going for a satisfying aesthetic and that’s all I provide to the viewer, ”she says.

As a high school art student, Wager continued to attach objects to her canvases. When she enrolled at the University of Albany, she still imagined herself to be a painter. But after taking her first soldering lesson, she turned to sculpture. “That was it,” she recalls. “I could defy gravity.”

Around the same time and returning to the Averill Park variety store, Wager made another important discovery, her future husband. The couple raised two children, Daniel and Jessica, who are now adults and have remained in the area.

While the kids were going up, Wager always took time to work in the studio and she also helped support the family by teaching. She has held positions at Russell Sage College (when it was known as Junior College of Albany), College of St. Rose, and the Albany Academy for Girls. Her longest tenure was 27 years in the Averill Park Central School District, where she retired in 2015.

Artist Mary Pat Wager works on one of her pieces in her studio on Tuesday, September 28, 2021 in East Greenbush, NY
Artist Mary Pat Wager works on one of her pieces in her studio on Tuesday, September 28, 2021 in East Greenbush, NYPaul Buckowski / Times Union

Sixteen years ago, the couple designed and built a home on a secluded, wooded 30-acre lot in East Greenbush. Just up a small hill from the main house is Wager’s studio, a single bedroom with 2,250 square feet of floor space and a 12 foot high ceiling. Like a contemporary art museum, the walls are crisp white and the floors immaculate concrete. The predominant color, however, is brown, due to the rusty patina of the thousands of items Wager has acquired over the course of a lifetime, from key chains to gas tanks. These are the building blocks of his earthy designs.

“I forgot all the sources. I once tried to fix it this way but gave up. You can pick up a piece but you forget where it came from. It all gets mixed up, ”says Wager.

The collection started very early when the family lived in a house adjacent to a steel mill. The property was once part of the mill factory and they kept finding interesting bits of metal on the ground. Wager saw possibilities for sculpture and inquired about getting more.

“I got permission to buy tons of this freeform steel. Tons – it’s so heavy! said Pari. “The owner gave me a weekend to choose what we wanted. I had a whole inventory of wonderful, unusual frozen steel shapes that look organic. I continue to tap into this supply.

If Wager had a model for this kind of collection and reuse, it would be his sculpture professor at UAlbany, the late Richard Stankiewicz. “He was well known at the time and was the father of junk sculpture. It would just go to the dumps, ”she said.

Wager has her own payback routines, as she explains, “I love real estate sales on the last day when what’s left is what nobody wants. I am looking for farms with old equipment like cutter bars, seeders and old wheels. They often allow me to come in and take whatever I want.

But she never stooped to visiting a landfill. She has friends for that. “I knew a person who worked in a dump,” she recalls. “He brought me a load of steel every week for $ 40.”

In addition to metals, certain industrial wood parts and antique furniture sometimes do the trick. Some polished stones are also attractive. They can be placed high up in metal constructions, all of which are part of Wager’s “gravity defiant”. What is avoided are all plastics, most glass, and anything that has bright colors or a recent vintage.

The bet usually has a number of coins going at any given time. His completed works are grouped into series, often by theme. Some series are in progress, others finished. One series that she hopes to come to an end concerns Covid.

Artist Mary Pat Wager works on one of her pieces in her studio on Tuesday, September 28, 2021 in East Greenbush, NY
Artist Mary Pat Wager works on one of her pieces in her studio on Tuesday, September 28, 2021 in East Greenbush, NYPaul Buckowski / Times Union

“For months there were no residences, no shows, no meetings and all the work had a Covid tendency,” Wager calls. Among the pieces is “Time Line”, consisting of a length of barbed wire with watches hanging from it. Also, “Lights Out” which has a photo of a woman in a graceful round frame paired with a thermometer. Wager also mentions the one titled “Infection” but refuses to describe it, saying only that “it’s hard to watch”.

Such an explicit editing of materials is rare for Wager, whose more typical creations are fanciful and invite dialogue and broad speculation. During his long career, the artist seems to have heard every imaginable interpretation of his work. While making the tour of her workshop and her park, she quietly gives in to a journalist who, caught up in the charm, claims to see in one of these little steel spots the silhouette of a rodeo cowboy riding bareback, and which gleefully refers to a series of large outdoor sculptures like “these lollipops”.

“What the viewer finds or sees is totally beyond my control,” says Wager.

Glancing over the vast array of materials in his studio, one can’t help but wonder what Wager will come up with next. She’s probably also curious about it. “My goal is to use all the equipment,” says Wager. “That’s my goal.”

Joseph Dalton is a freelance writer based in Troy.


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WATCH NOW: Free Community Resource Fair Offers A Variety Of Opportunities For The Public | Local News https://momentodada.com/watch-now-free-community-resource-fair-offers-a-variety-of-opportunities-for-the-public-local-news/ https://momentodada.com/watch-now-free-community-resource-fair-offers-a-variety-of-opportunities-for-the-public-local-news/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 20:00:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/watch-now-free-community-resource-fair-offers-a-variety-of-opportunities-for-the-public-local-news/ Tulsi Becker, a nursing educator at Gateway, said the wide variety of resources and connections available at the event were fantastic. Support local journalism Your membership makes our reporting possible. {{featured_button_text}} “It’s just great community action to offer,” Becker said. Joe Hamlett, of the Kenosha County Aging & Disability Resource Center, said he was happy […]]]>

Tulsi Becker, a nursing educator at Gateway, said the wide variety of resources and connections available at the event were fantastic.

Support local journalism

Your membership makes our reporting possible.

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“It’s just great community action to offer,” Becker said.

Joe Hamlett, of the Kenosha County Aging & Disability Resource Center, said he was happy to meet people in person again after struggling at the worst of the pandemic.

“It’s always useful for people who come looking for information and documents,” Hamlett said.

Nicole Leipski, of the University of Wisconsin-Extension, had a similar feeling.

“It’s great to finally go out and connect with people in person,” said Leipski. “It’s the beauty of connecting all these agencies together for the benefit of the community. “

Nes Ismaili, also with UW-Extension, said the event also provided a chance for community organizations to connect with each other.

“I already have a bunch of cards in my bag,” Ismaili laughed.

Other organizations in attendance included the Shalom Center, United Way of Kenosha County, Boys and Girls Club of Kenosha, Kenosha Public Library System, Women and Children’s Horizons, Kenosha Police Department, Kenosha Human Development Services, First Student , Employment Service Connection, Action communautaire Racine-Kenosha and Familia Dental.


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Boshell Foundation Virtual Conference: Color in Ancient Mediterranean Sculpture https://momentodada.com/boshell-foundation-virtual-conference-color-in-ancient-mediterranean-sculpture/ https://momentodada.com/boshell-foundation-virtual-conference-color-in-ancient-mediterranean-sculpture/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 20:49:13 +0000 https://momentodada.com/boshell-foundation-virtual-conference-color-in-ancient-mediterranean-sculpture/ Ancient Etruscan When they were created, ancient Greek, Etruscan, and Roman sculptures did not have the appearance we see them in museums today. Their surfaces, now mostly ordinary marble, were rather enriched with layers of paint. Polychromy, a term derived from the Greek for “many colors,” refers to the application of this paint, which ancient […]]]>

Ancient Etruscan

When they were created, ancient Greek, Etruscan, and Roman sculptures did not have the appearance we see them in museums today. Their surfaces, now mostly ordinary marble, were rather enriched with layers of paint. Polychromy, a term derived from the Greek for “many colors,” refers to the application of this paint, which ancient viewers believed enhanced the work’s meaning and beauty. Like form, color was one of the most important elements of ancient sculpture.

In most cases, only microscopic traces of ancient painting survive, making it difficult to reconstruct the original appearance of these sculptures. Accordingly, it is important to separate evidence from speculation in our interpretations of polychromy on ancient sculptures. Through modern technology, research into ancient literary sources, and comparison with works from various media, curators, scientists and art historians have further discovered the complexity of painting techniques in art. old. Beyond trying to understand ancient color, this research can also improve our knowledge in other fields, notably how the ancient Mediterranean peoples represented themselves, their heroes and their gods through painted sculpture.

This program features insights from Mark Abbe, an expert in ancient polychromy, and curator Katharine Raff and curatorial scientist Giovanni Verri, who will reveal the results of their recent research into the polychromy of works in the museum’s collection.

About the speakers

Marc Abbot received her MA in Art History and Archeology (2007) and her PhD in Greek and Roman Art and Archeology (2013) from New York University, Institute of Fine Arts, as well as an Advanced Certificate in Conservation of historical and artistic works (2007).

Abbe teaches a full range of undergraduate and graduate courses in the history of ancient art. A specialist in Greek and Roman antiquity, he approaches works of art as expressions of culture that are best explained by situating them in their historical, social and philosophical contexts. In addition to extensive archaeological fieldwork in the Mediterranean (Italy, Greece, Turkey and Egypt), he has professional training in art conservation and scientific research of works of art. He has received research grants from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, the Leon Levy Foundation, the American School of Classical Studies and the American Research Institute in Turkey. Specializing in the study of color in Antiquity, his main areas of current research are Greek and Roman marble sculpture, in particular questions related to their ancient coloring and polychromy, and the digital visualization of historical materials.

He is the founder of the Multidisciplinary Ancient Polychromy Network at the University of Georgia and is an Associate Professor in the Department of Classics.

Catherine raff is Elizabeth McIlvaine, Associate Curator of Ancient Mediterranean and Byzantine Arts. She holds a doctorate in art history from the University of Michigan (2011), where she also obtained a master’s degree in art history (2006) and a certificate in museum studies (2008). While Raff’s main research interests focus on the arts of the Roman world, she has also worked on subjects related to the museum’s collections in Greek, Etruscan and Byzantine art.

Since joining the department in 2011, Raff has played a significant role in a number of major departmental projects, including the full relocation of the Mary and Michael Jaharis Galleries of Greek, Roman and Byzantine Art in 2011-12 , as well as exhibitions and installations including A Portrait of Antinous, in Two Parts (2016) and Collecting Stories (2019). Raff was also Editor-in-Chief and Senior Author of Roman Art at the Art Institute of Chicago (2017), an online academic catalog featuring historical and technical original art research on 165 works of Roman art in the collection. , including marble sculptures, coins, glass. , mosaics, jewelry, architectural reliefs and portraits of mummies.

In her role as curator, Raff appreciates the opportunity to discover new storytelling possibilities through the dynamic reconsideration of the collection, finding engaging and innovative ways to make the arts and cultures of the ancient Mediterranean world relevant and accessible. to the contemporary public.

Since 2019, Giovanni verri was a conservation scientist in the Department of Conservation and Science. He holds a PhD in Physics from the University of Ferrara, Italy, and a Masters in Conservation of Mural Paintings from the Courtauld Institute of Art in London, UK. His research interests include the development and application of investigative techniques for color analysis. In 2007, he developed an imaging technique called visible-induced luminescence imaging, through which it is possible to map the presence of Egyptian blue, a blue pigment widely used in ancient times, even when it is otherwise. invisible to the naked eye. This led to some interesting discoveries about the use of color in ancient times and beyond, including how blue was used in the skin tones of mummy portraits at the Art Institute.

Please note that all event times listed are in central time.

We recommend that you use a laptop or desktop computer and download the latest version of Zoom to take advantage of this program. You can submit questions for speakers in advance or during the program using the Google form below.

If you have any questions about the virtual programming, please contact museum-programs@artic.edu.

Closed captioning will be available for this program. For questions regarding accessibility arrangements, please send an email to access@artic.edu.

This conference is generously sponsored by the Boshell Family Foundation.


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Fruit Sculptures in Hackney Honor the Windrush Generation | Windrush scandal https://momentodada.com/fruit-sculptures-in-hackney-honor-the-windrush-generation-windrush-scandal/ https://momentodada.com/fruit-sculptures-in-hackney-honor-the-windrush-generation-windrush-scandal/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 13:21:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/fruit-sculptures-in-hackney-honor-the-windrush-generation-windrush-scandal/ The first permanent artwork honoring the Windrush generation in the UK has been unveiled in the east London borough of Hackney, as councils across the country kick off the first day of Black History Month. The artwork, created by artist Veronica Ryan, is one of two permanent sculptures that symbolize the council’s respect and commitment […]]]>

The first permanent artwork honoring the Windrush generation in the UK has been unveiled in the east London borough of Hackney, as councils across the country kick off the first day of Black History Month.

The artwork, created by artist Veronica Ryan, is one of two permanent sculptures that symbolize the council’s respect and commitment to the Windrush generation and their heritage and contribution to the region. The second, by Thomas J Price, will be unveiled next spring.

Ryan’s three Caribbean fruit sculptures – Custard Apple (Annonaceae), Breadfruit (Moraceae) and Corosop (Annonaceae) – in bronze and marble were installed in Narrow Way Square on Mare Street on Friday morning.

“I was invited to work on Windrush because it’s so complex,” Ryan said. “I grew up in the 1950s. My parents moved between London and Watford. I remember some of the complexities my parents had in the 1950s. I remembered my mother and some of her friends discovering the Ridley Road market, and my mother bought fabrics and yarns. I remembered some fruits and vegetables.

The use of fruits is linked to the narrative of migration and movement, she added. She hopes the artwork will foster a sense of belonging within the local community and provide a vital public space to celebrate their cultural heritage.

“I hope that the community will recognize itself through my choices. Through breadfruit, soursop, an apple with cream, that the community will say: “Oh my God, oh I know them. These are things that we have grown on the trees back home, ”she said.

Carole Williams, senior member of the board’s response to the Windrush scandal, described the permanent artwork as “another step on the road to accomplishing the work we pledged to do as a board when we adopted Windrush’s Global Motion in 2018, which was the first of its kind in the country ”.

The motion has two parts: political work that calls for an end to hostile environment policies, questioning the impact it continues to have on the Windrush generation and their descendants; and celebrate and honor the community.

The placement of the sculptures follows the removal and renaming of public statues and street names dedicated to slave traders, colonialists and racists across the UK. In Hackney, the council removed the Cassland Road Gardens road sign – named after slave trader John Cass – and renamed it Kit Crowley Gardens, after a “pillar of the community” who spent six decades in support its neighbors.

Williams said, “You can’t have one without the other. You must question past practices while making a conscious choice and a conscious decision to honor, celebrate, and commemorate those who have made a positive contribution to life in Hackney.

She insisted that the consultations and the name change were “a real opportunity to tell the lost story of Sir John Cass’ story” and added: an important part of our story. By remembering this, we also pledge not to repeat this story as well. “


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