Painting – Momento Dada http://momentodada.com/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 00:37:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://momentodada.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T222814.835-150x150.png Painting – Momento Dada http://momentodada.com/ 32 32 See inside Emily Marie Miller’s studio, whose light-filled countryside space influences her fantastical paintings https://momentodada.com/see-inside-emily-marie-millers-studio-whose-light-filled-countryside-space-influences-her-fantastical-paintings/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 00:37:01 +0000 https://momentodada.com/see-inside-emily-marie-millers-studio-whose-light-filled-countryside-space-influences-her-fantastical-paintings/ Every day, painter Emily Marie Miller crosses state lines, traveling from her home in New York’s Hudson Valley to her studio in the Berkshire Mountains of Massachusetts. The past few months have been particularly long studio days for the Florida-born artist, who recently closed her solo exhibition “Ring of Fire” at the Monya Rowe Gallery […]]]>

Every day, painter Emily Marie Miller crosses state lines, traveling from her home in New York’s Hudson Valley to her studio in the Berkshire Mountains of Massachusetts. The past few months have been particularly long studio days for the Florida-born artist, who recently closed her solo exhibition “Ring of Fire” at the Monya Rowe Gallery in New York to follow it up with contributions to the exhibition. collective of the gallery “The Bathroom Show”, which opens this week.

View from the studio Courtesy of the artist and Monya Rowe Gallery, NY.

The studio, which is located in the MUSE (Multi-Use Studio Experiment) complex near the Housatonic River, offers towering windows, stunning views and two “studio assistants” – resident cats named Artemis and Calliope. In her paintings and drawings, Miller creates nocturnal worlds populated only by women – women who look a bit like the artist herself and who engage in strange rituals and sexual interludes. The artist admits a particular interest in podcasts on cults as well as a passion for science fiction audio books.

We joined the artist as she left for a well-deserved week of rest and relaxation in Maine and she showed us around her airy country studio.

The painting medium.  Courtesy of the artist and Monya Rowe Gallery, NY

“The Paint Holder”. Courtesy of the artist and Monya Rowe Gallery, NY

What is the most indispensable object in your studio?

My paint cart. The paint cart is a bit like my altar – I tend to it every day in order to get into the paint flow. He has a system that has been in place for years. It contains items like a perfectly sized glass palette from a flea market in Gowanus, a beautiful paint scraper pressed with my initials from my brother-in-law Charlie, a paint tray filled with Murphy’s oil soap for dipping my brushes (in a method recovered from working as a studio assistant for Todd Bienvenu).

Completed works for

Completed works for “The Bathroom Show” in the workshop
Courtesy of the artist and Monya Rowe Gallery, NY

What is the studio task on your calendar this week that you are most looking forward to?

I completely walked out of the studio this week. After working for my solo exhibition “Ring of Fire” and my group exhibition “The Bathroom Show” back to back, I’m taking a week off in Maine.

What atmosphere do you prefer when you work?

I prefer an orderly work environment. Not too much clutter. I am a neat painter. I also like the calm. My current studio is the best I’ve ever had – lots of natural light, high ceilings and ample space. It’s a wonderful working atmosphere.

Do you listen to music or podcasts while you work, or do you prefer silence? Why?

I mainly listen to fantasy and sci-fi audiobook series while I paint. I just finished the Mists of Avalon series and now I’m listening to it again Kingkiller Chronicles for the first time since high school, which is kind of a neckbeard vibe. I like podcasts about abuse of power and cult groups. The album I have on repeat this year is the orange glow by Globelamp.

Who are your favorite artists, curators or other thinkers to follow on social media right now?

A few Instagram accounts I’m enjoying right now are Balarama Heller and Anastasiya Tarasenko. Balarama Heller’s photographs are both mystical and earthy, and I enjoy her Instagram stories, which show clips of New York through her eyes. Anastasiya Tarasenko curates the weirdest collection of Instagram Stories reposts, in a way that feels authentic and complements their work.

Research and drawing materials in preparation for

Research and drawing materials in preparation for “Ring of Fire” at the Monya Rowe Gallery. Courtesy of the artist and Monya Rowe Gallery, NY

When you feel stuck while preparing for a show, what do you do to get out of it?

When I’m stuck preparing for a show, my first move is usually to try to force productivity. When I finally get it, I stop and do nothing, waiting for the new idea to come to fruition. Taking a break is always fruitful. I also do a lot of reading and research in my practice, which tends to happen after “blocked” periods.

What trait do you most admire in a work of art?

There is a sense of presence that you get with a piece of art that is done well. I can’t explain it, but when you know, you know.

What trait do you despise the most?

I hate when I see a job online and it looks worse in person. This is the biggest disappointment for me. The surface and the beauty of the paint application are so important.

Drawings and reference material in the workshop.  Courtesy of the artist and Monya Rowe Gallery, NYDrawings and studio reference material.  Courtesy of the artist and Monya Rowe Gallery, NY

Drawings and reference material in the workshop. Courtesy of the artist and Monya Rowe Gallery, NY.

What images or objects do you look at while you work?

Recently I have been doing large charcoal drawings as studies for paintings. I’ve hung them on the studio walls within sight of where I’m painting, so I always look at the drawings for reference. I also look at books and open sketchbooks on chairs.

What is the last exhibition you saw that marked you and why?

I was very impressed by Naudline Pierre’s recent exhibition at the James Cohan gallery. There were many different mediums and ideas on this show, executed to perfection. It was ambitious and well done.

MUSE Studios on the Housatonic River, Housatonic MA / Courtesy of the artist and Monya Rowe Gallery, NY

MUSE Studios on the Housatonic River, Housatonic MA/ Courtesy of the artist and Monya Rowe Gallery, NY

What made you choose this studio over others?

It was difficult to find a studio in the countryside, but luckily I found the best studio I’ve ever had thanks to Camille Breslin. I cross the New York-Massachusetts border every day to get to MUSE Studios, an old mill building on the Housatonic River. I have 100 inch high windows and can hang out with the resident pest control team, tuxedo cats named Artemis and Calliope.

Describe the space in three adjectives.

Peaceful, spacious, sunny.

Calliope and Artemis pest control cats.  Courtesy of the artist and Monya Rowe Gallery, NY.

Calliope and Artemis pest control cats. Courtesy of the artist and Monya Rowe Gallery, NY.

How does the studio environment influence your way of working?

I have so much more space and natural light in my current studio than I have in years. I was able to have spaces dedicated to drawing, and I can see colors correctly with natural light.

Being outside the city helped me consider and understand physical space, which is what I work with in paintings. I also have more mental space and my nervous system feels relaxed. As a result, my work is less and less cluttered. There is plenty of room for growth!

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Try unlimited breakfast and a flower pot painting session this Sunday https://momentodada.com/try-unlimited-breakfast-and-a-flower-pot-painting-session-this-sunday/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 09:03:13 +0000 https://momentodada.com/try-unlimited-breakfast-and-a-flower-pot-painting-session-this-sunday/ The Abu Dhabi session even includes free-flowing mimosas… Looking for a healthy way to start your day? Design & Dine, the team behind some of our favorite paint and grape parties, is adding breakfast and a relaxing flowerpot painting class to their list of events. The next one will take place this Sunday, July 3, […]]]>

The Abu Dhabi session even includes free-flowing mimosas…

Looking for a healthy way to start your day? Design & Dine, the team behind some of our favorite paint and grape parties, is adding breakfast and a relaxing flowerpot painting class to their list of events. The next one will take place this Sunday, July 3, with events in Dubai, Le Méridien Mina Seyahi, and Abu Dhabi’s St. Regis Saadiyat Island.

A perfect Sunday evening to get the creative juices flowing, the session kicks off at 11am meaning you can still enjoy that weekend lie-in and runs until 1.30pm. Whether you’re rounding up your friends and making a day out of it, or looking to meet new people at a social event, everyone is welcome – all levels are encouraged to try.

The session is priced at 270 Dhs per person, with a deposit of 170 Dhs prepaid and the remaining 100 Dhs to be paid on the same day. You’ll receive all your materials included: your blank canvas terracotta pot, plus everything you’ll need to turn it into a masterpiece. Whether you start with an entry-level model or focus on the intricate cityscape, let your imagination run wild. Once you’re done, you can take your colorful creation home with you.

In Dubai, the creative session is combined with an all-you-can-eat breakfast, with all your favorite breakfast classics, plus unlimited tea, coffee and juice. If you’re in the capital, the same deal also includes two hours of bottomless mimosas to sip while you paint.

It looks like a great Sunday for us…

Le Meridien Mina Seyahi and St Regis Saadiyat Island, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Sunday July 3, Dhs270. designanddine.com

Pictures: Facebook

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Blue Fall River paint hydrangea project https://momentodada.com/blue-fall-river-paint-hydrangea-project/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 16:25:26 +0000 https://momentodada.com/blue-fall-river-paint-hydrangea-project/ FALL RIVER — The Hydrangea Beautification Program is taking firm root in Fall River as more hydrangeas bloom around town and paint the landscape blue. Begun three years ago as a collaborative effort between Creative Arts Network Inc., the city, People Incorporated and others, these strategic plantings reflect the city’s close ties to the Azores, […]]]>

FALL RIVER — The Hydrangea Beautification Program is taking firm root in Fall River as more hydrangeas bloom around town and paint the landscape blue.

Begun three years ago as a collaborative effort between Creative Arts Network Inc., the city, People Incorporated and others, these strategic plantings reflect the city’s close ties to the Azores, where hydrangeas with Bright colors adorn the roadside.

The idea is to plant colorful flowering shrubs in riverfront and downtown areas, possibly adding to other neighborhoods.

“This is a great project for the city of Fall River, just look around the Government Center or here on Old Second Street, how much better it is with these hydrangeas. It means a lot to the city and it makes us look better,” Mayor Paul Coogan said at a press conference on Friday, June 24, to announce that June 25, 2022 would once again be proclaimed “Hydrangea Day” in the town of Rivière d’Automne.

Mayor Paul Coogan reads proclamation declaring June 25, 2022 as "hydrangea day" in the town of Fall River at a June 24 press conference on Old Second Street.

Reading the proclamation, the mayor stressed that “a clean and attractive city is an asset for economic development, improves the quality of life and enhances the visitor experience”.

As part of this civic project, there are already hydrangeas in the grounds of Battleship Cove, around City Hall, in parts of South Main Street and Old Second Street, and outside some businesses.

The goal for this year is to also plant hydrangeas on the greens at the Route 195 Connector and Water Street, which will be part of a small greenspace creation area. These two specific ventures will be accomplished through a collaborative effort with the Massachusetts Department of Transportation and Mass Coastal Railroad, according to Creative Arts Network Associate Director of Development Dave Dennis.

Creative Arts Network Associate Director of Development Dave Dennis shows the proclamation declaring June 25, 2022 as "hydrangea day" in the town of Fall River.

“It was an embellishment [project] as well as connectivity, connecting downtown and our waterfront,” Dennis said, noting that the waterfront is especially important now that the Massachusetts Cultural Council has voted to approve the Commonwealth’s 50th Designated Cultural District on the waterfront at Fall River, known as The Fall River Waterfront Cultural District.

Sandy Dennis, director of marketing and public relations for the Creative Arts Network, said a lot of work has been done with Commonwealth stakeholders, businesses, organizations, the City of Fall River and neighborhood groups.

“This week we planted 70 hydrangeas, with more to come,” said Sandy Dennis.

Creative Arts Network Director of Marketing and Public Relations Sandy Dennis previews the Hortensia beautification project at the press conference announcing June 25, 2022 as "hydrangea day" in the town of Fall River.

She noted that one of the key players in the project from the start was People Incorporated.

“They have been extremely generous in funding plantations in this area,” she said. “They have taken the lead and they will be co-sponsors of the Rt. 195 area.

Representing People Incorporated, public relations manager Peter Daily said his organization offers many programs and services, but one thing they really try to focus on is being a good community partner.

People Incorporated Public Relations Director Peter Daily delivers remarks at the Hydrangea Beautification Project press conference on June 24.

“This is a great opportunity for People Incorporated to get involved in the city, but also to beautify the city,” he said. “I’m lucky to be here representing People Incorporated, but to be honest, it’s the people in our programs who literally get their hands dirty and help plant and tend the flowers.”

In 2018, the city council voted to make hydrangeas the ornamental flower for the town of Fall River.

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The Lessons of Nothingness from Maverick Zen Monks https://momentodada.com/the-lessons-of-nothingness-from-maverick-zen-monks/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 17:15:03 +0000 https://momentodada.com/the-lessons-of-nothingness-from-maverick-zen-monks/ WASHINGTON — When the country is in a frenzy, when stress levels skyrocket, a little nothingness goes a long way. “Mind Over Matter: Zen in Medieval Japan”, at the Freer Gallery of Art (a branch of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art), is a show of ravishing absence: an austere and magnificent exhibition where […]]]>

WASHINGTON — When the country is in a frenzy, when stress levels skyrocket, a little nothingness goes a long way.

“Mind Over Matter: Zen in Medieval Japan”, at the Freer Gallery of Art (a branch of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art), is a show of ravishing absence: an austere and magnificent exhibition where form is immersed in silence. , and the ego dissolves into empty space. Large and majestic screens support almost impetuously barren landscapes. Kanji tumbles from calligraphy scrolls. Cracked teacups become portals to a world of impermanence.

It offers a nice introduction to Japanese painting (and some Chinese painting) from the 14th to 17th centuries, but there are other reasons why it might be worth a visit. Truly, this is the show for anyone in 2022 who wants the anxious, gasping outside world to be fair. Shut up.

Zen is the purest and most austere tradition of Mahayana Buddhism, and “Mind Over Matter” brings out more than 50 objects from Freer’s rich collection of Zen art, one of the largest outside of Japan. While the exhibit contains bowls, vases, lacquerware and woodblock books, the bulk is black ink painting, done by medieval monks working in Zen monasteries. The lines are calligraphic, impressionistic. The compositions feel free, sometimes even dotted. Up to 90% of a painting can remain intact – in Unkoku Tōeki’s breathtaking early 17th-century screen, the river, sky and mountainside are just expanses of emptiness.

But for the abbots and disciples who first contemplated these paintings, or for the artists who revered them centuries later, their rarity and spontaneity had a religious impulse as much as an aesthetic one. These were works that could immerse you in the world by distancing you from it, and make the self and the universe identical. Now, these monochromatic paintings may look simple, but their vanishing traces of black ink have the depth of philosophy, especially on the four- and six-panel displays shown here in a dimly lit gallery that even makes the football pitches feel. minimalists from Dia Beacon. padded.

Zen Buddhism originated in China – where the school is known as Chan – in the late 5th century AD and flourished during the Tang and Song dynasties. It was, from the outset, a more eccentric and spartan approach to Buddhism than the traditions of Indian origin that preceded it. Patriarch Zen/Chan Huineng (AD 638-713), an illiterate whose innate discernment of Buddha-nature would make him the school’s most influential teacher, argued that enlightenment was coming. as a “sudden awakening”, as opposed to the gradual realization by which earlier Buddhists attached importance to it. The main route to this sudden enlightenment was “thoughtlessness”: an emptying of the mind, achieved through meditation (Zen, in Japanese), until one reached the highest state of consciousness. high, known as satori.

Japanese monks traveling to China had contact with the Chan masters, but Zen did not really establish itself in Japan until around 1200. You can see the new religious tone in four paintings (of a set of 16) from arhats, or disciples of the historic Buddha, made by 14th-century artist Ryozen in the workshop of a Kyoto monastery.

Working from Chinese models, Ryozen painted the arhat Bhadra with his mouth open, his extra-long eyelashes drooping like palm fronds. Arhat Luohan also sits speechless, a three-eyed demon by his side; the arhat Nagasena is half-naked, his robe tilting over his emaciated and hungry body. The silhouettes are bald, knotty, twisted with age; they don’t look friendly; their severity and quirkiness set them apart from the serene bodhisattvas you may know. But as disciples who, through their own efforts, attained enlightenment and escaped the world of suffering, the arhats were the earliest examples of Zen practice.

These days, Zen has become a Western shorthand for peace and quiet, too reducible to a lifestyle hack. (Certainly today, in its meditation-app version: now Satori is referring to a laser hair removal clinic, and instead of contemplation at the tea ceremony, we have selfies at Cha Cha Matcha.) But the zen is much more than balance. Zen is also surprise, revolt and aberration. The masters incessantly beat their pupils with wooden sticks, or shouted and laughed in the wind, when they were not posing riddles (koan) that could never be understood. Maverick monks like Ikkyu Sojun, whose brash calligraphy broke with monastic celibacy and affirmed that sex was a valid step towards satori.

Zen celebrated antisocial figures, like the rustic Chinese poet Hanshan – known as Kanzan in Japanese or Cold Mountain in English – whose unadorned verses were, according to legend, scrawled on tree trunks and rocks. Hanshan was a favorite subject of Zen painters, and it appears here in a 14th-century scroll by an artist called Kao. Her hair is a rat’s nest and her tattered coat has been rendered with a simple calligraphic curl. (Hanshan would later be a muse for 20th century American artists; Jack Kerouac dedicated “The Dharma Bums” to him, and Brice Marden’s “Cold Mountain” series drew inspiration from Zen traditions to reconcile painting and poetry.) the same pleasure in insufficiency or inconclusiveness that Hanshan brought to his verses:

My heart is like the autumn moon
Shining clean and clear in the green pool.
No, that’s not a good comparison.
Tell me how should I explain.

Not everything was renunciation. In a sublime pair of late 16th-century black-ink screens, Japanese gentlemen take their leisure Chinese-style, practicing painting and calligraphy, playing music and on their way. Even in reconstructing broken ceramics, through the art of visible repair known as kintsugi, there was room for luxury: a tea set was re-soldered with gold fillets.

But you can’t take it with you, and in Zen landscapes the world at hand always appears evanescent, abbreviated. Stunted trees, rendered with a few strokes of black. Jagged mountains, erased in the mist. For all their beauty, these idealized and rationalized Zen paintings are best understood as the efforts of individual monks to express and stimulate the non-thought that would even reveal the painting as another part of this cycle of life and death. They offer no lesson, or rather they offer the primordial lesson of Zen: the lesson of nothingness.

This philosophical reluctance may make these paintings an even more welcome disturbance than their visual sparseness. Art today is a parade of the self, a cavalcade of stories, an endless transmission of messages. It’s all vanity. There is a ninth-century story about three Buddhist monks crossing a bridge in rural China and meeting a disciple of Zen master Rinzai. One of the monks gestures towards the water flowing beneath them. He asks, in a great metaphor, “How deep is the Zen River?” And the disciple, stepping forward to push the other monk into the water, said: “Find out for yourself.


Mind Over Matter: Zen in Medieval Japan

Through July 24, the Freer Gallery of Art (part of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art), Jefferson Drive at 12th Street, SW, Washington, DC; 202-633-1000, si.edu/museums.

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Subletter Examiner | Map error causes Painted Kettle zoning issue https://momentodada.com/subletter-examiner-map-error-causes-painted-kettle-zoning-issue/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 20:56:17 +0000 https://momentodada.com/subletter-examiner-map-error-causes-painted-kettle-zoning-issue/ MARBLETON — The mystery of how a small freeway lot — used for decades as commercial property — became zoned “residential” has been cleared up with an old surveyor’s map. At the heart of a months-long debate was The Painted Kettle cafe and consignment store, in a separate building around the corner from Rob’s Roost […]]]>

MARBLETON — The mystery of how a small freeway lot — used for decades as commercial property — became zoned “residential” has been cleared up with an old surveyor’s map.

At the heart of a months-long debate was The Painted Kettle cafe and consignment store, in a separate building around the corner from Rob’s Roost RV and Mobile Home Park in Marbleton. They are all zoned together as a mobile home park, a residential designation.

The painted kettle is in a building on adjacent but separate land, owned by Rob and Tammi Thomson for 18 years. The Thomsons said that when they purchased the property, the building was sold to them as commercial property.

Currently, the city’s zoning plan designates Lot 31 and the old building as “residential” – so staff told them and his son Rendy Thomson that he needed a building permit. conditional use, approved by neighbors, to operate The Painted Kettle as a commercial enterprise.

Commercial

“We bought it 18 years ago as a commercial property,” Rob Thomson told council at several meetings and at the June 8 meeting of the Marbleton Planning and Zoning Board. “The city gave us a commercial license to operate it (for many uses) for 18 years.”

The couple wanted to know how and when the city rezoned Lot 31 as part of the residential mobile home park, insisting the city map must be wrong.

“It would be the only business on the freeway frontage not zoned commercial or industrial,” Rob Thomson said.

Earlier this year, city staff brought up the commercial use of The Painted Kettle in a residential area before Marbleton City Council, to decide whether it needed a CUP. City attorney Thayne Peterson said the goal was consistency in the city’s zoning regulations.

The Thomsons disputed the city’s position and asked staff to check past records and maps to find out when Lot 31 became residential. Thomson found a 2003 county map showing him as a commercial, asking if he could be grandfathered.

Record gap

On June 8, City Clerk Shannon McCormick said she went through the stored records.

“We zoned it as a ‘mobile home park’, formerly ‘residential’ and the building as well. The 2008 map indicates it is a “mobile home park”, she said.

The fire destroyed some city records, so there are gaps, she said.

Marbleton P&Z Board Members John Garcia, Mike Hughes, President Rita Thomas and Leon Covell discussed the building’s past uses.

Hughes and Thomas remember when it was purchased from the El Paso Corporation and moved to its current site decades ago for use as a convenience store, grocery store and post office.

Hughes praised the Thomsons “for what you’ve done with it. … Anyone who can earn a dollar in this corner is welcome.

Hughes proposed that Lot 31 be zoned commercial. McCormick said the board could recommend him to the board.

Thomas said: “I’ve been here 50 years and I don’t understand why it’s not commercial.

McCormick said the town plan shows the entire property as a “mobile home park.”

“The map is wrong,” Thomas said. “…I think there was a mistake with the 2008 map.”

McCormick said, “If there’s a map out there, you gotta find it.”

She said council could file it and continue to investigate.

“Everyone knows it’s commercial,” Garcia said.

Covell asked, “What’s wrong with us just rezoning?”

Peterson said the board could recommend The Painted Kettle get a CUP or “rezoning – that’s pretty common practice.”

There was no “conspiracy theory” against the Thomsons, he added.

Covell suggested laying the discussion down until surveyor Scott Scherbel can research his and his father’s decades of city plans.

Thomas agreed – “We’ll wait for Scott Scherbel to come back and if he doesn’t agree with us – we think it’s commercial. Wait, don’t fight for it. We never questioned causes your business.

old map

On June 13, Scherbel presented his findings to the full council – Jeff McCormick, Roger McMannis, Mayor Jim Robinson, BJ Meador and Karen Wenz.

“1986 was the first time I made a zoning map for the city,” he said. It was hand drawn with periodic updates and “clearly shows” lot 31 as “commercial”.

In 2002 the maps became digital and in 2008 zoning was added which designated the entire property as a mobile home residential park.

“There are two possibilities,” he said. “First, the city passed an ordinance or a resolution? Second, we made a drafting error and didn’t split (Rob’s Roost’s property) into two batches.

Peterson said he would draft a resolution for the July 11 council meeting to reaffirm or change Lot 31 as commercial, a “paper trail” to ensure Painted Kettle is a separate and viable business.

Scherbel said, “In my opinion, lot 31 is commercial; the rest was a mistake.

Robinson asked Peterson to meet with the Thomsons to make sure the wording was correct.

“The whole point of this process and a resolution was to cut the knot and start over,” Peterson said.

Meador said the Thomsons were right about their past commercial zoning – “It completely reverses what we were starting with, that they had to get a CUP.”

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Interior: how to get the “best possible surface” for painting – creates a “flawless finish” https://momentodada.com/interior-how-to-get-the-best-possible-surface-for-painting-creates-a-flawless-finish/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 03:00:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/interior-how-to-get-the-best-possible-surface-for-painting-creates-a-flawless-finish/ Painting the walls is one of the easiest and cheapest ways to change the look of a room. Whether the change is positive or negative depends on how well Britons understand what they need to do to achieve professional results. Rob Abrahams, co-founder of COAT Paints, spoke exclusively to Express.co.uk about how to prep a […]]]>

Painting the walls is one of the easiest and cheapest ways to change the look of a room. Whether the change is positive or negative depends on how well Britons understand what they need to do to achieve professional results. Rob Abrahams, co-founder of COAT Paints, spoke exclusively to Express.co.uk about how to prep a wall for painting.

He explained, “Preparation is key when it comes to painting.

“The object of the game is to give you the best possible surface for all that beautiful paint to stick on and to make sure the finish is flawless.”

The first step is to organize all the items needed for the task. These include:

● Sugar soap (or mild dishwashing liquid), bucket and sponge.
● Scraper and wall plaster
● Stepladder
● Screwdriver (to loosen sockets and fasteners)
● 180 grit sandpaper (check sandpaper package)

READ MORE: ‘The right order’ for painting a room to make the process ‘easier’

“Once it’s dry, use a piece of 180-grit sandpaper to rub the area down to a smooth finish. Be a little careful if your current paint is a gloss or silk finish.

“If this is the case we recommend scrubbing the wall to ‘touch down’ the surface or using a specialist primer to ensure your topcoat adheres properly, painting over glossy materials is not ideal.”

Those with new plaster, it’s a little different story. Painting a newly coated wall requires more preparation because it must be sealed to provide a stable surface for the finish coat, according to the painting professional.

He advised: “Allow the plaster to dry to an even color and finish, paying particular attention to the corners.

“Now apply a mist coat of good quality emulsion with water ratio (according to manufacturer’s instructions) or paint thinned 10% with water.

“This mist coat will soak into the plaster, sealing the surface and preparing it for top coats ensuring the surface has the same finish.”

Now that you’ve finished preparing for a smooth, stable surface, it’s time to clean up the dust and dirt.

Rob said: “Take a bucket with lukewarm water and sugar soap (or a touch of mild washing up liquid) and clean the walls from top to bottom.

“This step is another key step, don’t paint cobwebs, they don’t look good!”

The expert explained that there is no need to soak the wall, just a light cleaning then once dry, do the same again with cold water and you are good to go.

This process will also highlight any final lumps or areas that may be causing aggravation.

Owners can always give them another sand “to finish prepping like a boss,” says Rob.

He continued: “Best advice too, most people leave the radiator in place and have a hard time cleaning and painting behind it.

“For many newer properties, the radiators are usually set on two brackets, so it’s very simple to lift them up and place them lightly on the floor or box while still attached.

“Just make sure you’ve double-checked before trying, but it can save you a lot of time.”

With good quality paint, Brits shouldn’t need a primer, but if the surface is shiny or silky or the household is damp or stained, they will need a specialist primer, says the expert.

To achieve the cleanest lines, the last step is to glue along baseboards, door frames and any edges or details.

Rob suggested: “You can use our eco decorating tape or a good quality tape, don’t skimp or you’ll pay for it when you lift it up and the paint gets under it.”

“Once you’ve taped it on, just run your finger along the top edge to make sure it’s in place, straight.”

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I Tried TikTok’s Finger Paint Contour Hack https://momentodada.com/i-tried-tiktoks-finger-paint-contour-hack/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 21:25:02 +0000 https://momentodada.com/i-tried-tiktoks-finger-paint-contour-hack/ Image source: POPSUGAR Photography / Renee Rodriguez A hack to get around your nose using only your fingers recently went viral on TikTok. To test it, you only need the contour product of your choice and, of course, your fingers. An editor put the makeup hack to the test and was impressed with the results. […]]]>

Image source: POPSUGAR Photography / Renee Rodriguez

  • A hack to get around your nose using only your fingers recently went viral on TikTok.
  • To test it, you only need the contour product of your choice and, of course, your fingers.
  • An editor put the makeup hack to the test and was impressed with the results.

A few weeks ago I had my second run-in with contact dermatitis and my first run-in with steroid acne. All in all, that meant I was out of the skincare and makeup game for almost three weeks. Although I mostly prefer not to wear makeup, when the three weeks were almost over, I was honestly eager to put on some new makeup looks that I had been eyeing. During the weeks where I couldn’t use any of my favorite products, I spent a lot of time browsing TikTok and saving tons of makeup hacks to try out in the future.

The one I was most excited to try was a finger paint nose contour hack from TikTok user Theresa B. In the video, she contours her nose using just a contour stick and her fingers, and the hack is quick and easy and looks amazing.

@reesepiecexo

Chinese tiktok nose contour tip! #asianmakeup #asianbeauty #nosecontourhack #douyin

♬ Pretty Please – Jackson Wang & Galantis

Normally, when I do my contour, I draw it directly on my nose using the contour product of my choice. From there, I blend everything together with a wet beauty blender. If I really want to be specific, I sometimes use a makeup brush to draw it in. If I’m in a hurry, sometimes I tan my nose all over. Anyway, I’ve never gotten around my nose using just my fingers.

Before testing the hack, I started by applying my makeup normally to the majority of my face. I applied a tiny bit of my all-time favorite concealer, Lawless Conseal the Deal Concealer ($26); a little blushing; and a tiny bit of lip liner, then it was time to outline my nose.

Tiktok finger paint nose outline

Image source: POPSUGAR Photography / Renee Rodriguez

Instead of drawing the outline directly on my nose, I applied the product to the pads of one of my pointer fingers. In the video I had seen on TikTok, Theresa B. used the Fenty Beauty Match Stix Matte Contour Skinstick ($28), however, I chose to use the Rare Beauty Warm Wishes Bronzer Stick ($23) because that I had on hand. From there, I rubbed my two index fingers together to evenly distribute the product. Then I traced the pigment along the tip of my nose as well as the inner nostril area to form a V. Then I dabbed the rest of the product under the beginning of each eyebrow. With my clean fingers, I then blended it in while gliding the product along the bridge of my nose to connect the two dots together.

The Rare Beauty Bronzer Stick blends extremely well, so I wasn’t worried about getting too much product on my face – in fact, I was a bit worried otherwise. I ended up having to apply bronzer twice to the pads of my pointer fingers, but once I finally got enough product on my nose, I loved the end results.

Image source: POPSUGAR Photography / Renee Rodriguez

The hack contoured my nose easily, and it was 10 times faster than any other contour trick I’ve tried in the past, with truly impressive results. I also didn’t use a single ounce of concealer or highlighter on my nose, but it still looked slimmer than ever. I love it was fast and accurate, as I find I usually have to sacrifice one or the other for makeup.

I recently went on a trip to Mexico and forgot my beauty blender so I used this hack every time I did my makeup. I loved the end result, and it’s a hack I plan to use even now that I’m back home.

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Iconic Ernie Barnes painting ‘Sugar Shack’ loaned to Houston museum a month after record auction https://momentodada.com/iconic-ernie-barnes-painting-sugar-shack-loaned-to-houston-museum-a-month-after-record-auction/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 11:07:36 +0000 https://momentodada.com/iconic-ernie-barnes-painting-sugar-shack-loaned-to-houston-museum-a-month-after-record-auction/ THE WINNER OF A FIERCE BID WAR, art collector Bill Perkins paid a record $15.3 million for ‘The Sugar Shack’ (1976) by Ernie Barnes (1938-2009) at Christie’s New York on May 12. The iconic painting has been estimated at around $200,000, so the staggering price has made international news and long drawn widespread attention to […]]]>

THE WINNER OF A FIERCE BID WAR, art collector Bill Perkins paid a record $15.3 million for ‘The Sugar Shack’ (1976) by Ernie Barnes (1938-2009) at Christie’s New York on May 12. The iconic painting has been estimated at around $200,000, so the staggering price has made international news and long drawn widespread attention to Barnes and his image of a bustling dance hall scene at the Durham Armory in North Carolina.

After the auction, Perkins gave several media interviews. He said owning “The Sugar Shack” was a childhood dream, that he would have paid a lot more, and that he planned to loan the painting to a museum. He wanted to “let others connect to it. It means a lot to America, and it certainly means a lot to black America,” Perkins told Bloomberg, “and then I’m going to hang it in my house.

Just a month after acquiring “The Sugar Shack”, Perkins is realizing his desire to share the work with the public. The Houston hedge fund manager and founder of Skylar Energy loaned the famous painting to his local museum.


Ernie Barnes, “The Sugar Shack”, 1976 (acrylic on canvas). | Collection of William O. Perkins III and Lara Perkins. © Ernie Barnes Family Trust

On June 15, “The Sugar Shack” will be on display at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston (MFAH), where it will be on display until December 31.

“I would like to thank Bill Perkins for his generous loan to the museum of the extraordinary Ernie Barnes painting,” MFAH Director Gary Tinterow said in a statement. “The Sugar Shack will occupy a prominent place in the Museum’s brand new home of modern and contemporary art, the Nancy and Rich Kinder Building, where it can be enjoyed by our visitors as part of the works in the permanent collection.

Collector Bill Perkins called “The Sugar Shack” a “phenomenal painting” and said he was thrilled to share it with all of Houston.

Born in Durham, North Carolina, Barnes was a professional football player before devoting himself full-time to his artistic practice. He lived and worked in Los Angeles, but his roots in the segregated South continued to inspire his figurative images of the African American experience. “The sugar shack” became the artist’s best-known work through its association with popular culture.

Barnes made two versions of the painting. The first appeared on the cover of Marvin Gaye’s 1976 “I Want You” album. A second version, the painting now owned by Perkins, appeared in the credits of Good Times, the 1970s television sitcom.

“Lara and I are thrilled to be able to share this phenomenal painting with all of Houston,” Perkins said in a statement, referring to his wife Lara Perkins. “As I have said many times, the acquisition of ‘La Cabane à sucre’ was for me the realization of a childhood dream. I know Ernie Barnes’ masterpiece will be as inspiring to all who see it as it has been to us. CT

BOOKSHELF
“From Pads to Palette” (1995) is an autobiographical volume by Ernie Barnes. Alongside his football sketches and paintings, the artist chronicles his childhood in Durham, North Carolina, his football experiences, including AFL segregation and the early years of the NFL, and the start of his career. artistic with his first solo exhibition at the Grand Central Art Galleries in New York. Two children’s books chronicle the artist’s life, “Between the Lines: How Ernie Barnes Went from the Football Field to the Art Gallery” with illustrations by Bryan Collier and “Pigskins to Paintbrushes: The Story of Football-Playing Artist Ernie Barnes”, written and illustrated by Don Tate. “Die With Zero: Getting All You Can from Your Money and Your Life” by collector Bill Perkins, published last year.

TYPE OF SUPPORTING CULTURE
Do you like and appreciate the type of culture? Please consider supporting its ongoing production by making a donation. Culture Type is an independent art history project that requires countless hours and expenses to research, report, write and produce. To help support it, make a one-time donation or sign up for a recurring monthly contribution. It just takes a minute. Thank you very much for your support.

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Man arrested for spray painting a replica of the Pillar of Shame in Taipei https://momentodada.com/man-arrested-for-spray-painting-a-replica-of-the-pillar-of-shame-in-taipei/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 12:24:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/man-arrested-for-spray-painting-a-replica-of-the-pillar-of-shame-in-taipei/ Taipei, June 12 (CNA) A 19-year-old man was arrested on Sunday for spray painting a Taiwanese replica of a monument commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre that had been on display since June 4 in Freedom Square in downtown Taipei. The man surnamed Lee (李) told police he vandalized the sculpture to express his anger […]]]>

Taipei, June 12 (CNA) A 19-year-old man was arrested on Sunday for spray painting a Taiwanese replica of a monument commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre that had been on display since June 4 in Freedom Square in downtown Taipei.

The man surnamed Lee (李) told police he vandalized the sculpture to express his anger at the financial hardship and general hardship he was facing due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Taipei-based New School for Democracy, which built the sculpture – a replica of the Pillar of Shame – through a fundraising campaign condemned the act and demanded those responsible be held accountable.

The group reported the matter to a police station in Taipei’s Zhongshan District around 9:30 a.m. and about six hours later police arrested Lee, who was caught on surveillance camera painting the sculpture, according to the police.

Lee confessed to his involvement in the case and blamed it on anger over hardships due to the COVID-19 pandemic, police say.

According to their initial findings, police said Lee had previously violated the Maintenance of Social Order Act but was not affiliated with any political party or criminal gang, without providing further details.

However, Tseng Chien-yuan (曾建元), the group’s chairman, was unconvinced, saying it was not the first time that people had set out to sabotage the annual commemoration of the Tiananmen Square Massacre.

In the past, event organizers have reported similar acts of vandalism to police, which were then treated as an expression of free speech and treated as civil matters settled in private, Tseng noted.

The acts are important, however, as they could deter Taiwanese from highlighting the Tiananmen Square incident and the problems facing the Chinese Communist Party.

“Once the Taiwanese stop talking, no one in the Chinese community will talk,” Tseng said.

He believes the acts of vandalism are being led by someone behind the scenes and urged the government to find out who that person is “so that the spiritual freedom of Taiwanese people is not threatened.”

The Taipei artwork is inspired by the Pillar of Shame, a series of sculptures by Danish artist Jens Galschiøt commemorating the loss of life during specific events in history.

An eight-meter-tall sculpture commemorating the victims of the 1997 Tiananmen Square crackdown at the University of Hong Kong was dismantled and removed on December 22, 2021 as part of a wider crackdown on democracy and symbols anti-Chinese in Hong Kong.

Authorized by Galschiøt, the Taipei-based group built a replica of the Pillar of Shame and unveiled it on June 4 at a memorial vigil in Taipei on the 33rd anniversary of the Tiananmen Square Massacre, said Tseng.

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Artist Colette Savage will demonstrate painting and pastels on Tuesday at GO ART! https://momentodada.com/artist-colette-savage-will-demonstrate-painting-and-pastels-on-tuesday-at-go-art/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/artist-colette-savage-will-demonstrate-painting-and-pastels-on-tuesday-at-go-art/ The Batavia Society of Artists welcomes artist Colette Savage on Tuesday, June 14 at 7 p.m. at Go-Art/Seymour Place, 201 E. Main St., Batavia. Colette will demonstrate pastel painting. Non-members are welcome for a $5 fee. We will also have a very affordable art supplies and picture frame sale before the demo starting at 6:30 […]]]>

The Batavia Society of Artists welcomes artist Colette Savage on Tuesday, June 14 at 7 p.m. at Go-Art/Seymour Place, 201 E. Main St., Batavia. Colette will demonstrate pastel painting. Non-members are welcome for a $5 fee.

We will also have a very affordable art supplies and picture frame sale before the demo starting at 6:30 p.m., during the break and after the demo. Supplies and frames were donated by the Virginia Carr-Mumford family to help defray the cost of the artist demonstrations.

Award-winning artist, Colette Savage, is originally from Rochester and her love for the area she grew up in is reflected in the art she produces. A lifelong artist, Colette has been painting outdoors for 18 years. Most of his work is done in pastel, a medium of incredible versatility. Colette feels that there is always something new and exciting to discover when painting in pastel.

Colette received her BA from SUNY College in Brockport, but feels her greatest education came from working frequently on location where the challenge of producing a finished painting before the light changed taught her to work faster, more precisely and effectively.

Colette is a member of the Suburban Rochester Art Group, the Greater Rochester Plein Air Painters and the Pastel Society of Western NY.

You can view Colette’s extensive body of pastel paintings on the Internet. Colette maintains several websites: www.colettesavage.blogspot.com and www.colettesavage.weebly.com. You can read more about Colette’s plein air process at www.pastelsenpleinair.blogspot.com/. She recently posted several videos on You Tube, demonstrating several pastel painting tutorials. These can be viewed on (3) Colette Savage – YouTube

In addition to giving demonstrations and workshops, Colette teaches pastel painting, drawing and outdoor painting classes at the Art Stop and through Irondequoit Community Education. Original paintings and prints can be purchased from her Etsy shop at www.etsy.com/shop/ColetteSavage.

When not focusing on art, Colette works at Monroe 2 – Orléans BOCES as a Student Behavioral Assistant and Job Coach, working with young adults with developmental disabilities at the University of Rochester Medical Center .

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