Literature – Momento Dada http://momentodada.com/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 00:50:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://momentodada.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T222814.835-150x150.png Literature – Momento Dada http://momentodada.com/ 32 32 Is literature possible without the presence of the state in our literary imagination? https://momentodada.com/is-literature-possible-without-the-presence-of-the-state-in-our-literary-imagination/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 00:50:46 +0000 https://momentodada.com/is-literature-possible-without-the-presence-of-the-state-in-our-literary-imagination/ Literature is the domain of multiple voices, which we achieved by participating in Unmesha, an international literary festival organized by Sahitya Akademi in Shimla from June 16 to 18, with the support of the Ministry of Culture. It’s hard for anyone literature festival to provide space for all, especially in a society as complex as […]]]>

Literature is the domain of multiple voices, which we achieved by participating in Unmesha, an international literary festival organized by Sahitya Akademi in Shimla from June 16 to 18, with the support of the Ministry of Culture.

It’s hard for anyone literature festival to provide space for all, especially in a society as complex as ours, but Sahitya Akademi has tried to incorporate various marginal voices like those of women, Dalits, tribals and LGBTQIA people into his literary festival. With over 400 writers from different parts of India, as well as writers from 15 countries, it was truly a festival of international spirit and diverse expression.

I have seen leftists, rightists, ambedkarists and writers from various ideological backgrounds meet and kiss. There were no whispers behind the back or sneering comments about why one writer or the other got an invitation from Sahitya Akademi or why a tukkad baj or a manchiya kavi or a cinema wala was at such a festival. Such commentary is an integral part of the enlightened party in India, but here, in its absence, it felt like a literary confluence of various forms and ideologies.

While attending this state sponsored literary program, a question came to mind: is literature possible without the presence of the state in our literary imagination? Our Bhakti poets and various dissenting literatures in India and other countries have attempted to deny the state in their literary imagination. But we think dialectically and any refusal is also a kind of reception in one way or the other. I extend this argument a bit further here – in a society like India, where the state functions as the main anchor of democracy, is absolute non-state literary imagination possible?

In our time, the State is omnipresent. How a literary imagination possible without the state? The state can appear either in the form of criticism or in the form of appreciation. State democracy arouses aspirations that touch our imagination either as writers or as audiences. As in the case of Unmesha, the state also acts as a patron. In this way, the state influences our literary culture in various ways.
In the form of Union Minister of State for Parliamentary Affairs and Culture, Arjun Ram Meghwal, I witnessed the state interact with guest authors on the ridge along Shimla’s Mall Road. I also saw the struggle of Sahitya Akademi’s secretary, K Sreenivasarao, to create a balance to facilitate the emergence of diverse voices in this literary festival. As I searched for answers to these questions I was asking myself, I remembered a statement by an author during close personal interaction: “This is democracy – democracy gave us the state, so why should we hesitate to take advantage of it by doing literature?

The author is Professor, Govind Ballabh Pant Social Science Institute, Allahabad

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Takeaways from the literature for clinical practice https://momentodada.com/takeaways-from-the-literature-for-clinical-practice/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 17:00:08 +0000 https://momentodada.com/takeaways-from-the-literature-for-clinical-practice/ The Maui Derm NP+PA Summer 2022 program kicked off with a specialty status update. A review of current literature provided a platform for a panel discussion on the most influential articles and how their findings will change the practice of dermatology in 2022 and beyond.1 Presenters Ted Rosen, MD, Professor of Dermatology at Baylor College […]]]>

The Maui Derm NP+PA Summer 2022 program kicked off with a specialty status update. A review of current literature provided a platform for a panel discussion on the most influential articles and how their findings will change the practice of dermatology in 2022 and beyond.1

Presenters Ted Rosen, MD, Professor of Dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine and Chief of Dermatology at Houston VA Medical Center in Houston, Texas, James Treat, MD, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics and Dermatology and Director of Education, Pediatric Dermatology at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, the HUB for Clinical Collaboration in Pennsylvania, and Matthew J. Zirwas, MD, associate professor at Ohio University Heritage College of Medicine in Athens, Ohio.

Zirwas was responsible for developing the Contact Allergen Management Program (CAMP) for the American Contact Dermatitis Society (ACDS) and specializes in allergy patch testing, psoriasis and eczema.

He began by reviewing the paper “The influence of sun exposure and sun protection behaviors on allergic outcomes in infancy,” a study in which infants associated with a family with atopy wore UV dosimeters for the first 3 months of their life. This research determined that total UV exposure was strongly associated with the risk of developing atopic dermatitis.2

“It makes a lot of pathophysiological and epidemiological sense,” he said. “We treat AD with UV light, and childhood UV exposure has decreased in concert with increasing rates of AD.”

Zirwas went on to discuss the rapid improvement in scrotal burning syndrome with indomethacin, noting that oral carvedilol was the most effective treatment in his opinion.

When faced with a patient with red scrotum syndrome, start with 3.125 mg bid and titrate until symptom control. Although he observed some bradycardia, there were no cases of hypotension or fatigue in his patients, he said.

“Indomethacin also helped as a short-term rescue when carvedilol was not adequate,” Zirwas said, adding that the maximum dose should be 50 mg tid and tapered as quickly as possible.

Another paper that caught his eye last year was one that revealed that flushing while taking dupilumab (Dupixent; Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals) could lead to an emergent adverse event.3

The study began after people were placed on dupilumab for 24 weeks and found that 10 minutes after consuming alcohol, some patients developed periorbital and perioral erythema. However, the case report referenced in the article stated that the patient reported that these symptoms would “spontaneously resolve” within 20 minutes, “regardless of continued alcohol consumption,” the authors wrote. According to the patient, the reaction did not trigger every time she consumed alcohol, but “dark spirits would make the flushing worse,” she told investigators. According to the article, the patient’s reactions were less severe or less frequent if she consumed alcohol on consecutive days. adverse effects did not occur while taking tacrolimus, leading the authors to conclude that it was related to IL-4 inhibition.

The next study that Zir reviewed was a case study of 7 patients with contact dermatitis of the forearm following frequent surface cleaning. It was revealed that it could be irritant or allergic contact dermatitis and recommendations included cleaning surfaces with water at work or after cleaning at home.4

A cohort study of long-term oral corticosteroid use and associated harms in adults came next, and Zir was noted when he needs an anti-inflammatory he turns to dexamethasone for dermatitis. atopic, contact dermatitis and itching, while if he needs immunosuppression he uses prednisone medication to treat conditions such as lichen planus, pemphigus or pemphigoid.5

Turning his attention to a clinical trial that examined the effect of HNS cynatine on hair and nail parameters, he found that in a randomized, double-blind, controlled study when using keratin treated with From sheep’s wool, the nails saw a great reduction in breakage and significant increase in nail hardness. Hair luminosity has also increased significantly.6

Other publications he reviewed dealt with the impact of laboratory tests and supplementation on patients with alopecia; improving the lipid structure of the stratum corneum to improve skin barrier function and protect against irritation in adults with dry, eczema-prone skin; and 1ll examining localized systemic contact dermatitis, using the vulva as a clue to identify allergen ingestion.

This latest study involved two patients with vulvar itching and dermatitis – 1 clearly flared in relation to their ovulatory cycle. The patient tested positive for formaldehyde and improved but did not disappear with avoidance. Zirwas said it would be reasonable to empirically recommend a month-long trial of strict aspartame avoidance in patients with “strange” dermatitis.seven

Another study investigated the efficacy and safety of HAT1 versus calcipotriol in the treatment of patients with mild to moderate chronic plaque psoriasis, and Zirwas presented the results of the open-label, randomized, comparative pilot clinical study. He called the results “impressive”.

A mini review was done on the effectiveness of azithromycin in the treatment of acne vulgaris and Zirwas commented on many studies about it.

“In my opinion, azithromycin has a better safety profile than doxycycline or minocycline,” he said. “There is much less concern about resistance. He added that the 2 regiments that make the most sense to him are ‘500 mg po qd x 3 days a week’ and ‘500 mg po qd x 4 days, then 500 mg po qd once a day.” week.”

The literature review continued with a remarkable study on the pruritus-reducing effects of omega-3 fatty acids in hemodialysis patients, where the results reduced itching by more than 50%.8

A more recent clinical trial was an evaluation of hand hygiene strategies on skin barrier function during COVID-19, with key takeaways being to use alcohol hand sanitizer instead of soap, and the idea that it was better to use cold water to wash your hands.9

Zirwas ended his talk by reviewing the efficacy and safety of lotion, cream, gel and ointment emollients for childhood eczema that excelled in a randomized phase 4 superiority trial. While families strongly preferred lotions or gels, there were no marked differences in AD severity or steroid use between the study groups.

Clearly there is a lot of interesting and innovative research in dermatology, he said. “[Based on that]you will never practice the same way again,” Zirwas noted.

Disclosures

Zirwas is a speaker for Genentech, Novartis, Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals. He is a consultant for Sanofi/Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, FitBit, L’Oréal, LEO Pharma, Pfizer, Eli Lilly and Company, Arcutis Biotherapeutics, Ortho Dermatologics, Sol-Gel, Bausch Health and EPI Health. He is a researcher for Sanofi/Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, LEO Pharma, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Incyte, Vyne Therapeutics, UCB, Pfizer, Eli Lilly and Company, Asana Biosciences, Avillion, AbbVie, Edesa Biotech, Galderma, Dermavant, Arcutis Biotherapeutics, EPI Health, and Concert Pharmaceuticals. He is co-owner of AspeticMD.

References

  1. Rosen T, Treat J, Zirwas M. Dermatology update 2022. Presented at Maui Derm NP+PA. Held June 23-25, 2022, Colorado Springs, Colorado, and virtual.
  2. Rueter K, Jones AP, Siafarikas A et al. The influence of sun exposure and sun protection behaviors on allergic outcomes in early childhood. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2021 May 19;18(10):5429. doi: 10.3390/ijerph18105429. PMID: 34069576; PMCID: PMC8161152.
  3. Igelman SJ, Na C, Simpson EL. Alcohol-induced flushing in a patient with atopic dermatitis treated with dupilumab. JAAD Case Representative. 2020 Jan 25;6(2):139-140. doi: 10.1016/j.jdcr.2019.12.002. PMID: 32021896; PMCID: PMC6994276.
  4. Hamann CR, Duprat G, Dagrosa AT, Mann JA. “Office dermatitis”: a case series of 7 patients with contact dermatitis of the forearm due to frequent cleaning of the surface. Dermatitis. 2021 Nov-Dec 01;32(6):e104-e107. doi: 10.1097/DER.0000000000000766. PMID: 34115668.
  5. Yasir M, Goyal A, Sonthalia S. Adverse effects of corticosteroids. [Updated 2021 Jul 8]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Edition; 2022 Jan-. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK531462/
  6. Beer C, Wood S, Veghte RH. A clinical trial to investigate the effect of cynatine HNS on hair and nail parameters. ScientificWorldJournal. 2014;2014:641723. doi: 10.1155/2014/641723. Published online October 16, 2014. PMID: 25386609; PMCID: PMC4214097.
  7. Admani S, Maghfour J, Jacob SE. Localized systemic contact dermatitis: The vulva as a clue to identify allergen ingestion. Int J Dermatol Woman. 2021 Mar 3;7(5Part B):843-844. doi: 10.1016/j.ijwd.2021.02.009. PMID: 35028397; PMCID: PMC8714567.
  8. Forouhari A, Moghtaderi M, Raeisi S et al. Pruritus-reducing effects of omega-3 fatty acids in hemodialysis patients: a randomized crossover clinical trial. Hemodiale Int. 2022 Feb 3. doi:10.1111/hdi.13007. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35112475.
  9. Montero-Vilchez T, Martinez-Lopez A, Cuenca-Barrales C et al. Evaluation of hand hygiene strategies on skin barrier function during the COVID-19 pandemic: a randomized clinical trial. Contact dermatitis. 2022 Apr;86(4):276-285. doi: 10.1111/cod.14034. Epub 13 Jan 2022. PMID: 34954837.
  10. Ridd MJ, Santer M, MacNeill SJ et al. Efficacy and safety of emollient lotions, creams, gels and ointments for childhood eczema: a pragmatic, randomized, phase 4 superiority trial. Lancet Child Adolesc Health. May 23, 2022: S2352-4642(22)00146-8. doi: 10.1016/S2352-4642(22)00146-8. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 35617974.
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Algerian envoy and PAL agree to promote ties through literary exchanges – Journal https://momentodada.com/algerian-envoy-and-pal-agree-to-promote-ties-through-literary-exchanges-journal/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 02:51:36 +0000 https://momentodada.com/algerian-envoy-and-pal-agree-to-promote-ties-through-literary-exchanges-journal/ ISLAMABAD: Pakistan and Algeria share a friendship that extends to various fields such as politics, economy, trade and defence. Writers and poets from the two countries should visit each other so that relations between the countries can be strengthened, Algerian Ambassador to Pakistan Brahim Romani said on Monday. Addressing the President of the Pakistan Academy […]]]>

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan and Algeria share a friendship that extends to various fields such as politics, economy, trade and defence. Writers and poets from the two countries should visit each other so that relations between the countries can be strengthened, Algerian Ambassador to Pakistan Brahim Romani said on Monday.

Addressing the President of the Pakistan Academy of Letters (PAL), Dr. Yousuf Khushk, during his visit to the academy, Mr. Romani said: “I believe that through this visit, the two countries will be able to foster a literary relationship”.

The envoy further said that a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) in the field of literature should be signed between PAL and its Algerian counterpart.

Dr. Khushk was of the opinion that this endeavor would certainly foster good relations between writers from the two countries, adding that he would cooperate fully with the Ambassador in this regard.

“Literature can be used as a powerful tool to develop ties,” he said, adding that exchanging writers’ delegations and translating literature on a reciprocal basis was the need of the hour. . They unanimously agreed to celebrate 60 years of diplomatic relations between Pakistan and Algeria through literature.

Posted in Dawn, June 21, 2022

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Blurring Boundaries: fiction that directly affects readers https://momentodada.com/blurring-boundaries-fiction-that-directly-affects-readers/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 13:28:20 +0000 https://momentodada.com/blurring-boundaries-fiction-that-directly-affects-readers/ By Vikas Datta Fiction, by its very definition, is an imaginary world, populated by characters that spring from the author’s imagination and are nourished by the interest of readers. We readers simply spend part of our time contemplating the microcosm of a world that sometimes looks like ours, sometimes does not. Our point […]]]>

By Vikas Datta

Fiction, by its very definition, is an imaginary world, populated by characters that spring from the author’s imagination and are nourished by the interest of readers. We readers simply spend part of our time contemplating the microcosm of a world that sometimes looks like ours, sometimes does not.

Our point of view is something like “…If we could fly out of this window hand in hand, soar above this big city, gently lift the roofs and take a look at the strange things that happen… pass, the strange coincidences, the plannings, the crossed objectives, the wonderful chains of events, working across the generations and leading to the most extreme results, it would make all fiction with its conventions and its planned conclusions the most obsolete and unprofitable .

It was Sherlock Holmes talking to his companion, Dr. John Watson, in “A Case of Identity” (from “The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes”). What makes it paradoxical is that Holmes apparently breaks the boundaries of his frame of existence to weigh in on the fact-fiction relationship.

But what happens when characters transgress their fictional status to speak to their reading audience. Next, we have a “Breaking the Fourth Wall” situation. The term actually derives from the visual manifestations of culture, particularly theatre, where an imaginary – and transparent – ​​“wall” separates the audience and the actors, who act as if unseen.

This phenomenon has also extended to other forms, such as films and television shows, but especially to certain forms of literature. In this, the characters seem unaware that they are fictional characters, and that readers are watching and following them closely, to reach out to them, or for that matter, their creator. The purpose is usually comedic, but can also be serious, if there is a mental state or some sort of existential crisis that arises.

Let’s look at some examples of “Breaking the Fourth Wall” in the broader realm of literature.

This is not a very recent phenomenon – Shakespeare’s characters often addressed the public. The protagonists of ancient Greek theater did the same – from the moment the concept took hold, or perhaps even before.

In our time, even comics such as “The Beano” and “Dandy” are good examples of this, and even, the Franco-Belgian comic tradition was full of it, say, “Achille Talon” (“Walter Melon” in English) or “Philemon”, but above all, “Tintin”.

We have the intrepid boy reporter who winks at his readers near the end of “King Ottokar’s Scepter” (1938-39), informing them at the end of “The Secret of the Unicorn” (1942) – much to Captain Haddock’s surprise – that the rest of the adventure will be told in “Red Rackham’s Treasure” (1943), and that the cover of “The Castafiore Emerald” (1962) has Tintin in the foreground, looking directly the reader, with a smile and a finger to his lips.

Much of what Snowy says in the series breaks the fourth wall – or for the benefit of the reader because the other characters can’t hear it. At one point he looks at the player and says “I could have told them that. But no one would have listened to me!”

In “real” literature, the phenomenon predates Shakespeare.

Examples can be seen in Dante’s “The Divine Comedy” (1320), where the poet, as narrator, addresses the reader at least 18 times, throughout his journey through Hell, Purgatory and Heaven, Chaucer’s “The Canterbury Tales” (c.1400) then more recognizably in the second part (1615) of Cervantes’ “Don Quixote”.

The sequel features the man from La Mancha, the author, the book’s fans, and a fake sequel written by another man, which forces our hero to track down the fake sequel’s Don Quixote to get him to relinquish his rights to the sequel. name/concept, so the real author can write a real sequel.

It addresses the issue of understanding a character it is written about, and it is assumed that Spanish readers – and the characters – are familiar with the first part, as well as the fraudulent sequel actually published.

Jane Austen’s “Northanger Abbey” (1818) is a pre-modern example, with the narrator ranting about the importance of reading novels.

“I will not adopt that ungenerous and impolite custom so common to novelists, of degrading by their contemptuous censorship the very representations, to the number of which they add themselves – joining with their greatest enemies in bestowing the harshest epithets to such and hardly ever allowing them to be read by their own heroine, who, if she happens to pick up a novel, is sure to turn the insipid pages in disgust. is not patronized by another’s heroine, from whom can she expect protection and consideration?

The 20th century was when the phenomenon took off, and for some reason, classic detective fiction has seen a lot of it.

A striking example is the superlative “closed room mystery”, John Dickson Carr’s “The Hollow Man” (1935) where one chapter consists of Dr. Gideon Fell lecturing on examples of such crimes in fiction. Asked by his interlocutor about the relevance of this in relation to the current situation, he replies: “Because we are in a detective novel, and we are not deceiving the reader by pretending that we are not there.”

Edmund Crispin’s eccentric English language and literature professor at Oxford – and part-time amateur sleuth – Gervase Fen, in his nine appearances in comic mystery novels and two anthologies of short stories, is well aware that he is in a novel, and does not hesitate to say so regularly throughout the series.

In “The Moving Toysshop” (1946), considered the climax of the series, a character asks our hero why he is on the left side, and he retorts that after all (Victor) Gollancz publishes them, in a cry- to the publisher’s political leanings.

Next, the narrator of CS Lewis’s seven volumes “The Chronicles of Narnia” (1950-56), a remarkable fantasy story for children and a religious allegory for more mature readers, uses personal pronouns to refer to readers and to himself. same.

Stephen King in his series “The Dark Tower” (1982-2004) freely uses this device – he himself acts as a character and is able to help other characters.

Also, before the epilogue of the eighth and final book, “The Dark Tower” (2004), he addresses the reader in “Coda”, saying that the story ended perfectly without an epilogue, where Roland finally enters into the tower, and that they should put the book down without reading it.

And then Jasper Fforde’s “Thursday Next” fantasy comic series, so full of meta-levels to the point that the mind sometimes staggers, features a scene in “Something Rotten” (2004), where the feisty and Unstoppable, Thursday, is about to get intimate with her newly uneradicated husband, Landen Park-Laine, but suddenly stops and says she can’t go on because so many people are watching. After he reminds her that she’s not a character in a book, she apologizes and says she’s been spending too much time in the BookWorld (you’ll have to read the show to find out what’s up). acts).

Then there’s the galactic tyrant Emperor Zhark, a creation of a friend of Thursday’s husband, and intended to serve as an example of science fiction’s worst writing, yet a (mostly) reliable ally of our heroine.

Not only does he manage to bump into and exchange a few words with his creator, who plans to dramatically unseat him, but he also manages to renegotiate his fictitious contract to, among other benefits, provide more detailed descriptions of his first appearance. .

There are more examples but at this point readers should think that if they identify so much with a work of fiction, can the characters on some level, somewhere, feel the same about the other side ?

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VOX POPULI: In memory of the famous scholar of Japanese literature Donald Keene https://momentodada.com/vox-populi-in-memory-of-the-famous-scholar-of-japanese-literature-donald-keene/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 03:42:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/vox-populi-in-memory-of-the-famous-scholar-of-japanese-literature-donald-keene/ American-born Japanese literature scholar Donald Keene (1922-2019) was 16 when he encountered Chinese kanji characters. So different from the English alphabet, the ideograms captivate him. Keene became fond of kanji made up of many strokes. He was elated when he managed to write “eichi” (wisdom) and “yuutsu” (melancholy), each written with two multi-stroke characters. I […]]]>

American-born Japanese literature scholar Donald Keene (1922-2019) was 16 when he encountered Chinese kanji characters.

So different from the English alphabet, the ideograms captivate him.

Keene became fond of kanji made up of many strokes. He was elated when he managed to write “eichi” (wisdom) and “yuutsu” (melancholy), each written with two multi-stroke characters.

I visited the Kanagawa Museum of Modern Literature where “Donald Keene’s 100th Anniversary Exhibition: A Lifelong Pursuit of Japanese Culture” is being held until July 24.

The exhibits included a “meishi” business card used by Keene as a US military officer sent to Qingdao, China. On the card was his surname in “ateji” – kanji used to phonetically represent Keene.

When living in Japan, he often signed his name in various Ateji versions of his surname.

The museum also showed a photo of him holding a gun in his right hand and holding a Japanese-English dictionary under his left arm.

During World War II, Keene landed on one of the Aleutian Islands and was shocked to see a Japanese soldier commit suicide by slamming a hand grenade into his chest.

But from the letters and diaries of Japanese soldiers he read, he was also deeply impressed by the refined dignity with which they wrote their death poems and farewell notes.

This experience later inspired him to research the diaries of the poets Ki no Tsurayuki (c. 872-945) and Matsuo Basho (1644-1694).

Looking at various exhibits, I remembered the one and only time I attended Professor Keene’s lecture at Columbia University in the United States.

Speaking in both Japanese and English, he explained archaic contemporary Japanese literary expressions, including “adashi gokoro” (temptation to gamble) and “hiyoku renri” (marital vow of eternal love and fidelity).

He moved freely from subject to subject, including “Kokin Wakashu” (Collection of Poems of Ancient and Modern Times), famous Chinese imperial consort Yang Guifei, and Japanese author Yukio Mishima.

I was fascinated throughout the two-hour lecture, which was given in March 2011, right after the Great East Japan Earthquake.

Keene expressed deep concern for the affected areas, noting that the Tohoku region holds a special place in his heart because when he was younger he retraced the journey that Basho recounted in his “Oku no Hosomichi” ( The narrow roads to the Far North).

He also expressed his desire to live permanently in Japan after his retirement. And he got his wish by acquiring Japanese nationality and living his last years in Tokyo.

June 18 marks the 100th anniversary of his birth. I again contemplate the serendipity of this extraordinarily talented man encountering kanji for “wisdom” and “melancholy.”

–The Asahi Shimbun, June 17

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Vox Populi, Vox Dei is a popular daily column that covers a wide range of topics, including culture, the arts, and social trends and developments. Written by veteran writers from Asahi Shimbun, the column offers helpful perspectives and insights into contemporary Japan and its culture.

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As James Joyce’s ‘Ulysses’ turns 100, a Princeton class examines its 1922 setting https://momentodada.com/as-james-joyces-ulysses-turns-100-a-princeton-class-examines-its-1922-setting/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 21:06:45 +0000 https://momentodada.com/as-james-joyces-ulysses-turns-100-a-princeton-class-examines-its-1922-setting/ What does “Ulysses” by James Joyce tell us 100 years later? Published in 1922, the same year the Lincoln Memorial was dedicated and the Hollywood Bowl opened, “Ulysses” is an inextricable part of the modern literary canon that has received more than its fair share of praise (and criticism). Fans around the world mark Bloomsday […]]]>

What does “Ulysses” by James Joyce tell us 100 years later? Published in 1922, the same year the Lincoln Memorial was dedicated and the Hollywood Bowl opened, “Ulysses” is an inextricable part of the modern literary canon that has received more than its fair share of praise (and criticism). Fans around the world mark Bloomsday on June 16, the day the action of the novel takes place.

Still, Associate Professor of English Joshua Kotin thinks we’ve only scratched the surface of what ‘Ulysses’ has to offer. His graduate seminar, “Special Studies in Modernism: 1922”, explores the work of James Joyce as well as the contemporary publications of TS Eliot, Virginia Woolf and Claude McKay considering their influence 100 years later.

Josh Kotin (far right), Associate Professor of English, designed the seminar to explore Joyce’s work as well as the contemporary publications of TS Eliot, Virginia Woolf and Claude McKay in historical context. Also pictured: graduate students Mary Kate Guma (English), left, Lauren Bunce (English), Chloe Wheeler (comparative literature) and Grace Monk (comparative literature), and librarian Jennifer Garcon.

“This class presents a way of thinking about modernism and reflecting on the significance of this year,” Kotin said.

Stimulated by the centenary of the publication of “Ulysses”, Kotin believes that modernist studies must experience a renaissance. In addition to wanting his students to glean literary meaning from course texts, Kotin emphasizes the process of contextualizing literature as part of a larger historical conversation.

“I wanted them to think about what context is — we’ve always been told to contextualize literature, but I’m not sure anyone really knows how to define that process,” Kotin said.

To that end, Kotin enlisted Jennifer Garcon, Librarian for Modern and Contemporary Special Collections at Princeton University Library (PUL), who manages the collection, curation, and maintenance of materials from the 20th and 21st centuries. Kotin and his students made several visits to PUL’s special collections during the spring semester.

Three volumes of Ulysses

This German three-volume set of “Ulysses” by James Joyce, part of the PUL Special Collections, was published by Privatdruck in Basel, Switzerland in 1927.

Garcon supported the class by calling many copies of Joyce’s “Ulysses” from the library’s Sylvia Beach collection. Beach, an American bookseller in Paris, first published “Ulysses” in 1922 in her bookstore and lending library, Shakespeare and Company, which she founded in 1919. The shop becomes a meeting place for French, English, American, Irish and other writers — including James Joyce — from the 1920s to the 1930s.

The Beach Papers, acquired by PUL in 1964 and held at the Firestone Library, document much of Beach’s life and activities. The collection includes material related to Beach’s publications of the works of James Joyce, including the controversial “Ulysses”, which was banned in Britain and the United States until the mid-1930s. The collection also includes numerous documents related to Shakespeare and Company, correspondence with authors such as TS Eliot, Allen Tate, Richard Wright, George Antheil and DH Lawrence, as well as personal documents, photographs, writings, works of art, manuscripts and memorabilia from Beach.

“Students were able to see different editions of ‘Ulysses,'” Garcon said. “They could see it serialized, in its initial appearance in small magazines. They were able to touch and manipulate the objects themselves. And due to the variations in how it was printed and the publishers’ financial constraints at the time, they can also see a visceral difference in the material over time.

Watch ‘Ulysses’ in the context of the 1920s, create new scholarship

Kotin’s class also focused on the dichotomy between the sheer volume of commentary on Joyce’s work and the still untapped potential of archival reserves.

“On the one hand, we’re diving into the middle of a million conversations about these canonical, important, and influential books,” Kotin said. “On the other hand, we want to use the Firestone Archive to think about the potential of unpublished artifacts, texts and documents that have not been examined. How can these two versions of the story speak to each other?

As researchers, Kotin and Garcon frequently returned to the question of how to constitute new collections from the materials extracted from the archives.

“We discovered things together that we didn’t know were in special collections and identified gaps so we could say, ‘It would be great if the library could acquire material in this area,'” Kotin said. . One such resource was letters from black modernist authors such as Paul Laurence Dunbar, Ralph Ellison, and Richard Wright, which they found almost entirely in the archives of white publishers and poets.

“So now we have to think about how to build collections that are more than just miscellaneous letters,” Kotin said.

Graduate students and two members of the Class of 2022 who received special permission to attend the seminar were also tasked with scouring the PUL archives and finding something – anything – that has yet to be published and wrote about it. The project was based on the “Little Known Documents” section of PMLA – the journal of the Modern Language Association of America — in which researchers organize archives on unpublished documents.

“At first, I was surprised by how difficult the archiving work was,” Kotin said. “What does it mean to look at a letter, or even to know where to look? There are so many options in Firestone because it’s such a rich collection that students had a hard time figuring out where to look and how to figure out the item they were trying to look at.

“I took this course simply because I wanted the chance to examine canonical texts, and I was also really drawn to that component of working with archives,” said Grace Monk, a first-year graduate student in comparative literature. “It’s not something that a lot of upper classes do, although I think it’s something that a lot of people are supposed to do as part of their thesis, but they don’t really have a introduction before that.”

Odysseus Pages

This serialized edition of “Ulysses” by James Joyce, part of the PUL Special Collections, appeared in The Little Review magazine, March 1918, published by Margaret C. Anderson in Chicago.

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Select St. Albert schools to pilot new curriculum https://momentodada.com/select-st-albert-schools-to-pilot-new-curriculum/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/select-st-albert-schools-to-pilot-new-curriculum/ A few elementary schools in St. Albert will pilot the new science, French first language and literature, and French immersion language and literature curricula next year. A few elementary schools in St. Albert will be piloting new curricula next year. Alberta Education Minister Adriana LaGrange announced on May 17 that new curricula in K-6 Science, […]]]>

A few elementary schools in St. Albert will pilot the new science, French first language and literature, and French immersion language and literature curricula next year.

A few elementary schools in St. Albert will be piloting new curricula next year.

Alberta Education Minister Adriana LaGrange announced on May 17 that new curricula in K-6 Science, Arts and Literature in French Immersion, and French as a First Language and Literature have been updated in response to public feedback and are now ready to be piloted in schools.

St. Albert Public Schools Curriculum Services Director Catherine Coyne says about 20 teachers in the division have volunteered to pilot the immersion science and language arts curriculum. French so far.

“We don’t need to get our information to Alberta Education until mid-June, so the information is still evolving in terms of teachers declaring whether or not they want to be part of the pilot,” Coyne said.

“Admittedly, we don’t have all grade levels covered at this point.”

Conseil scolaire Centre-Nord, the French-language school board for north-central Alberta that includes La Mission French-language school in St. Albert, confirmed in an email to The Gazette that the division will pilot the French first language and literature curriculum next year.

Jonathan Konrad, acting assistant superintendent of Sturgeon Public Schools Education Services, said the division plans to pilot the public school French immersion program at École Morinville, which is kindergarten through 4th year. Konrad said he appreciates the “additional connection” to French immersion resources that Alberta Education provides schools to pilot the program.

As of June 4, Greater St. Albert Catholic Schools has not decided whether the division will pilot the new curriculum next year.

Teachers who volunteer to pilot the curriculum will provide feedback to government after the school year, and that feedback will inform final curriculum changes before they are rolled out across the province.

Coyne said the exact process for teachers to provide feedback has yet to be determined by Alberta Education.

“I understand, however, that there will be several opportunities for teachers to provide feedback,” Coyne said.

“Looks like it could be in the form of a meeting so they have a Zoom meeting and have conversations and focus groups [will] provide an answer [and] I suspect there will also be a survey where teachers can provide these very specific comments.

“A professional responsibility”

Coyne said there were many reasons why some St. Albert public school teachers volunteered to pilot the programs.

“Many feel it’s a professional responsibility to be part of the development of the program, and that includes trying it out in their classroom and providing that feedback,” she said.

“For some, they might be really interested in seeing a program in the making and testing it in their classroom and seeing how it goes.”

However, Coyne said switching to a new program is not an easy process.

“Any change is important work for teachers, because you have to look at what you’re already doing and evaluate it against the new curriculum.”

“It’s about finding the resources you need to teach the new curriculum [and] what skills might need to be completed that students might not have from the current curriculum in this pilot program,” she said.

“Then you have to create, potentially, different lessons and different experiences for students and for science that might look like different labs and activities.”

Public comment reports

On May 31, LaGrange announced the release of 13 government-commissioned feedback reports following the release of the draft K-6 curriculum in March 2021.

A report summarizing more than 34,000 survey responses found that 70% of all responses provided negative or critical comments about the proposed curriculum. Some 16% of all responses provided positive feedback and 14% provided neutral feedback, according to the report.

The report says 1,549 survey responses provided feedback specifically about the proposed science curriculum. Of the responses that included comments about the science curriculum as a whole, 292 respondents said the curriculum could be improved, while 100 respondents gave positive feedback about the curriculum, according to the report.

Comments specifically in response to the French immersion language arts program shared a common perspective that “reading and writing expectations for kindergarten students can be excessive and not developmentally appropriate, and do not match not up to expectations in English,” the report said.

According to the report, common comments about the French as a first language and literature program were that the program should include French perspectives, texts and content, as respondents noted that the draft program was a translated version of the French language program. and English literature. .

Curriculum updated after receiving feedback

According to LaGrange’s May 17 press release, the science curriculum has been updated with “revisions and additions … to incorporate scientific methods and hands-on activities, emphasize connections to nature, and address digital literacy and ethics”.

The French Immersion Arts and Literature curriculum has been updated to “reinforce Francophone perspectives and culture, provide logical learning progressions, develop effective and meaningful communication, and support critical thinking and language skills” , the statement said.

Finally, the press release indicates that updates to the French first language and literature curriculum “will support the development of Francophone identity through the inclusion of Francophone perspectives and cultures”.

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Oakland’s Loyal to the Soil Collective helps small businesses thrive https://momentodada.com/oaklands-loyal-to-the-soil-collective-helps-small-businesses-thrive/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 23:17:32 +0000 https://momentodada.com/oaklands-loyal-to-the-soil-collective-helps-small-businesses-thrive/ Free Oakland news, written by Oaklanders, delivered straight to your inbox three times a week. Your support feeds our press room! Thank you for supporting The Oaklandside and being part of our community. A donation to The Oaklandside goes beyond the newsroom. We amplify community voices, share the power of real information, and study systems, […]]]>

Free Oakland news, written by Oaklanders, delivered straight to your inbox three times a week.


When Oakland natives Michelle Walton and Wesley Dawan first started dating, they often met at one of the bookstores in town. “We would always have coffee or go for cocktails afterwards, and we would discuss the books we were reading separately or together,” Walton said. “And we learned so much from each other through these books.”

Those bookstore dates led to an idea that would eventually become their first joint venture: The Collective Oakland, an online bookstore that opened in fall 2019. The couple initially operated the business from their home, but with the vision of one day having a brick and mortar that could serve not only as a bookstore, but also as a place where people could gather with others to read, share stories and enjoy events.

“Would it be great if people of color read together, or could just enjoy books and coffee and cocktails like we do, you know what I mean?” Walton remembers the couple thinking.

Growing up, Walton regularly attended the Oakland Public Library’s summer program, which to this day encourages children, teens, and adults to read as many books as possible in exchange for prizes. But it wasn’t just the library where Walton cultivated his love for books. Marcus Books near the MacArthur BART station, the oldest bookstore specializing in African American literature, was and still is a Walton favorite. She often bought books at the original location in San Francisco, which closed in 2014.

Understanding that Oakland’s rich culture includes music, dance, and the arts, Walton and Dawan wanted to create a space where all of these worlds, including literature, would collide.

“How about we do more community-focused events? And basically for people like us,” she said. “Because there has to be a stage for people who just like to kick back, relax and rock. Many of them love books.

When it came to launching their online store, Walton and Dawan could only rely on themselves. Walton had to learn about online promotion and how to process orders — and there wasn’t much when The Collective Oakland first launched. But that all changed in the summer of 2020 when the business was featured on Oprah’s website as one of 127 black-owned bookstores in America amplifying the best in literature. The buzz from that exhibit, coupled with increased interest in Black-owned businesses and literature amid widespread protests for racial justice that summer, led to sales growth. Walton and Dawan decided to quit their full-time jobs to just focus on their business and started doing pop-ups, and by 2021 the business was doing so well they were able to donate several hundred pounds to children and families who could not afford to buy them.

Michelle Walton receives an email from representatives for Oakland author Leila Mottley confirming that she will be available to participate in an upcoming event at Loyal to the Soil. Credit: Amir Aziz

As their business thrived, Walton saw other small businesses in Oakland struggling to make ends meet during the early months of the pandemic. She was also keeping tabs on businesses in other parts of the country to see how they were adapting and was inspired by a particular business model in Atlanta run by The Village Market, which acted as a support center for entrepreneurs. black people in this town.

“I was like, we must have something like this here [in Oakland],” she says. “I kind of introduced it to a few people. I didn’t want to do it myself because I was so passionate and in love with our bookstore that I couldn’t run another business.

Eventually, Walton and Dawan reached out to Damon Johnson, executive director of Oakstop Alliance, a nonprofit dedicated to improving access to space for black-led social enterprises and POCs. “I called Damon and said, ‘I want to do a cohort of black entrepreneurs. And I want our bookstore to be the flagship brand. We must have a fighting chance.

In February this year, Walton and Dawan were in talks with Johnson and Trevor Parham, the founder of Oakstop, an affiliated black-owned social enterprise that provides affordable work and event space, as well as other support. local business owners and creatives.

Johnson and Parham invited Walton and Dawan to submit a proposal and it was quickly approved, at which point Walton began to see the couples’ original vision become a reality. “I was just like, ‘Okay, then we’re going to do this,'” she said. “It will happen.”

Loyal to the Soil Collective sells a variety of products from different local brands, which pay $400 a month to participate in the collective. Credit: Amir Aziz

The couple took over a storefront at 1719 Broadway and began sprucing up the space by painting, stripping old carpet and drawing up their business plan for what is now Loyal to the Soil Collective.

Using the rest of Dawan’s personal savings and the $5,000 the couple had received from the Oakstop-backed Black Business Fund, the showcase opened on April 23, showcasing products from 10 local black-owned businesses.

Members of the collective pay $400 a month to showcase their products at the store for four months, then are replaced by a new cohort of companies who do the same. Revenue from sales goes directly to each business. Additionally, once a company has had a turn in the cohort, it is eligible to rent the space on Broadway for $150 to hold events. The next cohort of Loyal to the Soil companies is expected to start in August.

Wesley Dawan and Michelle Walton pose for a photo at Loyal to the Soil Collective. Credit: Amir Aziz

Walton said the goal is to improve members’ chances of sustaining their business by increasing profits and reducing liabilities. “Working capital is such a hard thing to get,” Walton said. “So if you can get it immediately, you’re making all that money and putting it right back into your business.”

Community events are another part of the collective’s work, which Walton and Dawan are now focusing on. Next up is an adult spelling and play night scheduled for June 24th. Walton also hopes to have Oakland author Leila Mottley, whose new book Crawl was recently selected for Oprah’s Book Club, appearing in stores soon.

“It’s really about focusing on local people, highlighting and amplifying our voices,” she said.

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The unmet potential of clinical decision support tools in cardiology https://momentodada.com/the-unmet-potential-of-clinical-decision-support-tools-in-cardiology/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 21:11:29 +0000 https://momentodada.com/the-unmet-potential-of-clinical-decision-support-tools-in-cardiology/ Clinical decision support tools (CDS) are electronic systems that take information from patients’ electronic health records and make suggestions to clinicians on how to care for patients. These tools can, for example, see that a patient’s blood pressure is high, send a notification to the doctor to point this out, and suggest a response, such […]]]>

Clinical decision support tools (CDS) are electronic systems that take information from patients’ electronic health records and make suggestions to clinicians on how to care for patients. These tools can, for example, see that a patient’s blood pressure is high, send a notification to the doctor to point this out, and suggest a response, such as prescribing medication. In an article published on May 25, 2022 in The BMJ.

Yuan Lu, ScD, epidemiologist and assistant professor at the Yale School of Medicine, and colleagues reviewed the literature on CDS tools for cardiovascular care. The tools can be improved, Lu and coauthors found, writing in their abstract, “To date, the promise of CDS to provide scalable and enduring value for patient care in clinical practice has not been realized.

“There is evidence to show that clinical decision support has a positive effect on process outcomes, such as prescribing a drug, ordering clinical trials,” Lu said. “But the effect on the clinical outcomes, such as blood pressure, reduction in cardiovascular events, those kinds of clinical outcomes, has been mixed,” she added.

The authors note that across medicine, CDS tools have had only small effects on patient care and that until now there have been no reviews of the literature examining how the tools CDS affect cardiovascular care and the barriers encountered when implementing CDS in particular. In their article, Lu, along with Ted Melnick, MD, MHS, associate professor of emergency medicine and biostatistics, and Harlan Krumholz, MD, SM, professor of medicine (cardiology) and director of the Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation ( CORE), set out to fill this gap.

Lu and colleagues identified a total of 77 studies, including 19 observational studies and 58 randomized controlled trials, of how CDS tools affect cardiovascular disease care. The researchers analyzed the effects of CDS tools in two main areas: the outcomes of healthcare processes, such as whether doctors prescribe drugs or refer patients to specialists; and clinical outcomes, or whether the use of CDS tools was linked to improved heart health.

Of the randomized controlled trials, 45 examined the effects of CDS tools on health care process outcomes. Of these, 23 studies found that using CDS tools improved outcomes in healthcare processes, leading physicians to take the actions recommended by the tools more often. Process-related improvements don’t necessarily mean better patient outcomes, Lu noted.

Other studies included in the review looked at patient outcomes. Of the 41 studies that examined the effects of CDS tools on clinical outcomes, 10 reported that the tools were associated with improvements for patients. Seven studies reported that CDS use was correlated with reduced levels of heart risk factors, such as LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. Yet the other 31 studies reported no association or a mixed association between use of the CDS tool and heart health outcomes.

A major barrier to using these tools is that they are not well integrated into clinicians’ workflow, the authors found. For example, primary care physicians already have a lot to do in brief appointments. A CDS tool that demands attention in a way that is not helpful is “an added burden,” Lu said. “So, due to lack of time, many clinicians try to ignore the tool. CDS or ignore the alert.”

Clinicians often ignore alerts. For example, in one study reviewed by the authors, physicians received a total of 3,848 pop-up boxes with notifications. Of these, physicians only expanded 188 (5%) to reach the point where they could see the suggestion of the CDS tool.

Despite these mixed results, Lu still has faith in the potential of CDS tools. “I am convinced that if CDS is integrated into the electronic health record and clinical workflow, it holds great promise for delivering high quality care and impacting patient outcomes. It’s just that we’re not there yet,” Lu said.

To improve CDS tools, Lu said, tool developers and clinicians need to communicate back and forth during the development process to iteratively improve tools and ensure they meet clinicians’ needs. With more work, Lu is optimistic that the CDS tools will achieve their promise of improving patient care and outcomes “just as an enabler to help the clinician do their job faster and better.”

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Around the world in children’s books: focus on Arabic children’s literature https://momentodada.com/around-the-world-in-childrens-books-focus-on-arabic-childrens-literature/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 20:14:48 +0000 https://momentodada.com/around-the-world-in-childrens-books-focus-on-arabic-childrens-literature/ Starts on Thu Jun 9, 2022 6:00 PM British Summer Time (UTC+1) Register here. During our 3rd world tour, Arab children’s book experts will each recommend 2 titles which, according to them, should be better known. About this event Join us for another fascinating event focusing on little-known children’s literature. Our panel includes: Shereen Kreidieh […]]]>

Starts on Thu Jun 9, 2022 6:00 PM British Summer Time (UTC+1)

Register here.

During our 3rd world tour, Arab children’s book experts will each recommend 2 titles which, according to them, should be better known.

About this event

Join us for another fascinating event focusing on little-known children’s literature.

Our panel includes:

Shereen Kreidieh is a publisher, teacher and scholar from Lebanon. She is President of the Lebanese Chapter of IBBY, current member of the International Executive Committee of IBBY and member of the jury for the Hans Christian Andersen Prize 2018.

Yasmine Motawy teaches at the American University in Cairo and is a researcher, critic, translator, editor, consultant and writing mentor in the field of children’s literature. She has served on numerous award juries, including the Bologna Ragazzi Prize Jury 2021 and the Hans Christian Andersen Prize Jury 2016 and 2018.

Salwa Shakhshir is the Managing Director of Al Salwa Publishers, an award-winning publishing house based in Amman, Jordan, dedicated to publishing children’s and YA books in Arabic. They publish books for various authors in the Arab world and for ages ranging from newborns to young adults.

John Weber is responsible for the international language sections at the International Youth Library in Munich (IYL). He was also a project manager for the IYL’s project on Arabic language children’s literature conducted between 2017 and 2021. Claudia Soeffner is an English language specialist at the IYL.

Maria Daadoush, winner of the 2022 Sheikh Zayed Book Prize in Children’s Literature is a multi-award-winning children’s author and screenwriter based between the United States and Syria, who has published over 50 books in the Arab world and the United States. His storyline includes the comedy series Maraya and the animation channel Spacetoon. She also worked as the editor of the children’s magazine Fulla Magazine. She received her BA in Creative Writing from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2016.

The Sheikh Zayed Book Award is one of the world’s leading prizes dedicated to Arab literature and culture. Since 2006, the prize has brought recognition, reward and readership to the outstanding work of authors, translators, publishers and organizations around the world.

Now in its 16th year, the annual award aims to recognize some of the most challenging and exciting work emerging from the Arab world or engaging with its culture, including literary and scholarly works.

The award not only recognizes major literary and cultural achievements, but also aims to boost the publishing industry through the Sheikh Zayed Translation Fellowship, which aims to help produce more quality Arabic books that are translated, published and distributed outside the Arab world. Funding is available for translation into any language of all winning and shortlisted books in the Literature and Children’s Literature categories of the Prize.

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