Literature – Momento Dada http://momentodada.com/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 21:05:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8.1 https://momentodada.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T222814.835-150x150.png Literature – Momento Dada http://momentodada.com/ 32 32 Abdulrazak Gurnah wins the 2021 Nobel Prize for Literature | Smart News https://momentodada.com/abdulrazak-gurnah-wins-the-2021-nobel-prize-for-literature-smart-news/ https://momentodada.com/abdulrazak-gurnah-wins-the-2021-nobel-prize-for-literature-smart-news/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 21:05:50 +0000 https://momentodada.com/abdulrazak-gurnah-wins-the-2021-nobel-prize-for-literature-smart-news/ Abdulrazak Gurnah, 73, received the 2021 Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday. Illustration by Niklas Elmehed © Nobel Prize for Outreach Tanzanian novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah won the Nobel Prize for Literature 2021 for his “uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the plight of the refugee in the gulf between cultures and […]]]>

Abdulrazak Gurnah, 73, received the 2021 Nobel Prize for Literature on Thursday.
Illustration by Niklas Elmehed © Nobel Prize for Outreach

Tanzanian novelist Abdulrazak Gurnah won the Nobel Prize for Literature 2021 for his “uncompromising and compassionate penetration of the effects of colonialism and the plight of the refugee in the gulf between cultures and continents”.

Born in 1948, the writer grew up in Zanzibar. After the island freed himself of the British Empire in 1963, a violent uprising led to widespread persecution minorities of Arab origin. As a member of a targeted ethnic group, Gurnah, 18, was forced to seek refuge in England, writes Alison Flood for the Guardian.

During his exile abroad, Gurnah wrote to cope with the trauma of dislocation.

“What motivated the whole experience of writing for me was this idea of ​​losing your place in the world,” he told the New York Times‘Alexandra Alter and Alex Marshall.

Although Swahili is Gurnah’s first language, “English has become his literary tool,” notes the Swedish academy, which awards the annual prize, in a declaration. Since 1987 he has published ten novels and many short stories, many of which follow the lives of refugees in the light of the enduring loss, displacement and trauma caused by European colonization of the African continent. Professor Emeritus of English and Postcolonial Studies at the University of Kent, Gurnah has also published literary reviews on Indo-British novelist Salman Rushdie and Kenyan novelist and scholar. Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, among others.

Gurnah’s first novel, Departure memory, tells the story of a young man from the East African coast who comes of age under the oppressive conditions of a totalitarian regime. In paradise, which was shortlisted for the 1994 Booker Prize and is described in the statement as his “groundbreaking” work, Gurnah writes from the perspective of Yusuf, a 12-year-old boy who is forced into indentured bondage in Africa’s Is in the years leading up to WWI.

As VV Ganeshananthan noted for the New York Times in 2017, even minor Gurnah characters tend to have “richly imagined stories” that bring their unique identities to life. It is an intentional choice: to speak with Judyannet Muchiri about Africa in words on his most recent novel, Beyond, Gurnah explained:

My interest was not to write about war or the ugliness of colonialism. Instead, I want to make sure that the context in which the war and colonialism occurred is understood. And that the people in this context were people with entire existences.

Gurnah’s victory was greeted by some as a sign of progress for the Swedish Academy, which has historically favored white male and European writers. He is the first black writer to win the Nobel Prize for Literature since Toni Morrison in 1993, reports Andrew Limbong for NPR. Meanwhile, the last black African writer to win the award was Wole soyinka in 1986.

Speaking to Alex Shephard from New Republic, the chairman of the Nobel committee Anders Olsson “opposed” the question of whether migrant crisis “Had an immediate impact on our decision”, arguing instead that “the phenomenon of exile and migration has existed for many, many years”.

Gurnah was an unexpected winner, writes Shephard, as his novels “are largely unknown outside the UK and not particularly well known inside”. At Twitterreporter Jane Friedman pointed out that Gurnah has only sold 3,000 printed copies in the United States to date.

Last year, American poet Louise Glück won the award for her “unique poetic voice which, with austere beauty, makes individual existence universal”. Including Glück, just 16 price 118 recipients were women.

As Shephard observes in his annual commentary on the prize, “The prize has been awarded to Europeans 14 times during this century, despite the Nobel Committee’s emphasis on greater diversity and its quasi-public apologies for the well-deserved reputation of the Eurocentrism Prize.

The Swedish Academy itself has been mired in controversy in recent years. In 2017, the husband of a member of the academy, Jean-Claude Arnault, was accused of serial sexual assault and disclose the names of the winners to the bookmakers. The resulting scandal delayed the announcement of the 2018 award winner for a full year and indirectly led to the resignation of several academy members. Arnault was later convicted of rape and sentenced to two years in prison.

The academy has also been criticized for its selection of the Austrian author Peter Handke as a literary winner 2019. Handke has already expressed support for the late Serbian dictator Slobodan Milošević and publicly denied the 1995 Srebrenica genocide.

Earlier this week, the Academy announced the Nobel Prizes in physics, chemistry and medicine. The Nobel Peace Prize winner will be announced on Friday. Last year, the World Food Program, a United Nations organization fighting food insecurity around the world, won the prestigious award.



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10 Years of Stella: How Australia’s Women’s Writing Award Changed a Country’s Literature | Stella Prize https://momentodada.com/10-years-of-stella-how-australias-womens-writing-award-changed-a-countrys-literature-stella-prize/ https://momentodada.com/10-years-of-stella-how-australias-womens-writing-award-changed-a-countrys-literature-stella-prize/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 02:50:27 +0000 https://momentodada.com/10-years-of-stella-how-australias-womens-writing-award-changed-a-countrys-literature-stella-prize/ On International Women’s Day in 2011, a group of Australian writers and editors appeared at a literary fair and spoke about their frustration with the male-dominated book industry. The following month, when Miles Franklin’s shortlist was published with only male authors, these women decided it wasn’t enough to talk about the gender disparity they were […]]]>

On International Women’s Day in 2011, a group of Australian writers and editors appeared at a literary fair and spoke about their frustration with the male-dominated book industry. The following month, when Miles Franklin’s shortlist was published with only male authors, these women decided it wasn’t enough to talk about the gender disparity they were seeing – they had to do something. .

A decade later, the Stella Prize, whose title uses Miles Franklin’s first name, has become a heavyweight in Australian literature. Open to fiction and non-fiction since its first prize was awarded in 2013 – and since its expansion to include non-binary identifying authors and, starting this year, single-author poetry collections – the Stella is now having a profound effect on the Australian literary landscape.

“It wasn’t just an award on women writers, it was actually an award that sells books,” Louise Sherwin-Stark, CEO of Hachette Australia, told Guardian Australia. “It effectively linked these books to readers. From a publisher’s perspective, the Stella has become more and more important to us.

Jane Palfreyman, editor at Allen & Unwin, agrees. “The Stella and the Miles Franklin are the two awards that turn books into bestsellers, and the Stella did that in its first year, so it’s a huge achievement,” she says.

Stark and Palfreyman’s comments are supported by data provided to Guardian Australia by Nielsen BookScan Australia. Among the nine Stella Prize winners since its inception, an average sales volume increase of 875% was recorded the week the winner was announced compared to the previous week. For The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka (Text Publishing) by Claire Wright, which won the Stella in 2014, sales increased by over 1,800% in one week.

Compared to the other winners, Charlotte Wood was already selling an average of four times as many copies of her 2015 book, The Natural Way of Things (Allen & Unwin), in the week leading up to her victory. In the week of the announcement, sales were up another 235%. To date, the book has sold over 51,000 copies, more than 10 times Wood’s previous bestseller. His 2019 follow-up novel The Weekend (Allen & Unwin) has sold 58,000 copies to date.

Palfreyman believes that the success of the Stella Prize has also had a ripple effect on other literary prizes.

“The whole price landscape has opened up completely since the start of the Stella,” she says. “Until 2011, 39 men had won the Miles Franklin and 11 women. And after 2011, two men won it and nine women. It’s a fantastic example of what an award like Stella can do to encourage other awards to think about fairness, how they judge their prices.

Cate Blake, editor at Pan Macmillan Australia, says that while the Stella Prize is the most publicized aspect of the organization’s work, it has also carried out other activities which have contributed to greater diversity in Australian literature. over the past decade.

“Stella goes to schools, they work on things like the Stella Count, which takes into account the diversity of book reviews and newspaper coverage. Stella has set herself a mission and I would say they are achieving it.

Palfreyman says the Stella Count has been a driving force in persuading literary editors to review more books written by women and commission more female critics.

An ongoing study by Vida, an organization based in the United States and created to advocate for women in literature, found that although women buy two-thirds of the books, reviews in American and British journals and newspapers fall short. still mostly focus on male authors and reviewers.

The London Review of Books, for example, had 527 male authors and reviewers in 2014, compared to just 151 female.

In Australia, the statistics are less gloomy. When the first Stella Count was published in 2012, 40% of all reviews surveyed were for books written by women. In 2018, a survey of 12 national, metropolitan and regional publications, print and online, found that the figure had risen to 49%.

The Stella Count 2018 also found that eight of those 12 posts had more reviews by women than by men.

The 2019 and 2020 data are expected to be released later this year and will be the first tally to assess the effect of Covid-19 on the problem.

Natalie Kon-yu, one of the Stella counters and senior lecturer in Creative Writing, Literature and Gender Studies at Victoria University, told Guardian Australia that she would be surprised if the numbers had changed significantly since A 2015 Macquarie University study found that 65.2% of literary fiction writers and 76.2% of genre fiction writers were women.

“Australian women have been well represented for quite some time – they just weren’t well represented in the award culture or the culture of reviews,” Kon-yu said. “What Stella has done really well is raise the profile of women and non-binary writers and publicize their work.”

According to Nielsen data, 40% of Australian writers in the Top 50 Best Selling Adult Fiction in 2011 were male and 60% female.

In 2020, 31% of sales by volume were made by male authors and 69% by female authors.

The most profound change Kon-yu says he has observed in the Australian publishing industry over the past decade is the heightened awareness of writers of diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

However, this has yet to translate into adequate representation of people of color and First Nations writers in the literary award culture, she said.

“Our whole system, the way we rate literature, is outdated,” she says. “We come from an English canonical idea of ​​literary fiction which is narrow… and I don’t think there can be so many entries [in literary awards] by writers from different cultures and languages ​​or by First Nations writers, because there are [by] white writers.

“When I was part of the VPLA jury [Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards] price of unpublished manuscripts, I was avidly seeking the work of various writers and it just wasn’t there… and it broke my heart.

The Stella Prize will mark Thursday the anniversary of its creation with a Free Zoom forum with co-founder Chris Gordon in conversation with Carrie Tiffany (2013 inaugural award winner for Mateship with Birds), Emily Bitto (2015 award winner for The Strays) and Claire G Coleman (shortlisted 2018 for Terra Nullius).


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Divine Diane • The Nob Hill Gazette https://momentodada.com/divine-diane-the-nob-hill-gazette/ https://momentodada.com/divine-diane-the-nob-hill-gazette/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 16:00:41 +0000 https://momentodada.com/divine-diane-the-nob-hill-gazette/ Two new works pay homage to the legacy of one of San Francisco’s greatest poets. It was a difficult time for poetry. Last year alone we lost Diane de Prima in October 2020, Laurent Ferlinghetti in February, then, in quick succession, Janice Mirikitani and Jack hirschman – all the poets laureates of San Francisco, each […]]]>

Two new works pay homage to the legacy of one of San Francisco’s greatest poets.

It was a difficult time for poetry.

Last year alone we lost Diane de Prima in October 2020, Laurent Ferlinghetti in February, then, in quick succession, Janice Mirikitani and Jack hirschman – all the poets laureates of San Francisco, each of whom wore crowns lightly.

Di Prima’s death last year at age 83 marked the end of an era. She was a literary icon whose career combined artistic and political activism with long-standing Buddhist practice.

She has avoided the label “Beat” – although perhaps not “bohemian” – although she knows the characters of this world intimately, including Allen Ginsberg, Ferlinghetti and his close friend Michael mcclure. And her work, as well as that of other women poets like Joanne kyger, Lenore Kandel and Anne Waldman, on condition of counterbalancing the macho excesses of some of his peers.

Revolutionary Letters (City Lights Books) The seminal work of the late poet is being extended and reissued for its 50th anniversary.

It is therefore by chance that City Lights is reissuing an expanded edition of the 50th anniversary of its Revolutionary Letters, as well as the long-awaited thesis Spring and Autumn Annals, who serves as an elegy to her dancer-choreographer friend Freddie herko, who jumped out of his Greenwich Village apartment window in 1965, and a portrait of the vanished artistic effervescence and writers, artists and musicians of the circle of di Prima: poet-activist Amiri Baraka (formerly known as LeRoi Jones, and with whom she had a daughter), poets Frank O’Hara and Robert duncan, and jazz musicians Archie Shepp and Cecil taylor.

Sheppard powell, di Prima’s husband, says she wrote until the end, even though she literally couldn’t walk for the last three and a half years of her life. “Sometimes the poems were dictated, and sometimes she would use a stylus to type them on her iPhone,” says Powell, artist and healer. He notes that a major impetus for di Prima’s move to the West Coast in 1968 was to meet with a Zen Buddhist teacher. Suzuki roshi. “She said if he had been an apple picker, she would have followed him and picked apples.”

But she never shied away from social involvement, writing broadcasts for the free-spirited Diggers, as well as the Wild Founders. Emmett Grogan and the outlaw poet Kirby doyle. “Feeding people was the kind of political action she understood perfectly,” says Powell. “They had a free bank, a shoebox full of money that she kept above her refrigerator. It would be filled with some of the musicians who were starting to earn an obscene amount of money. Anyone who wanted to could get something out of it and it was never empty. As for his contributions to the Diggers, Powell laughs, then adds, “Each edition of the Revolutionary Letters became longer because the world never started to behave on its own.

Spring and Autumn Annals (City Lights Books) This new memoir as an elegy focuses on a decade of Diane di Prima’s life, starting in the mid-1950s.

But di Prima’s loyalty has always been to her muse, which she sums up in the poem Rant: The only war that matters is the war against the imagination. She was a fierce, funny feminist who unabashedly celebrated sexuality – though her notorious Memoirs of a Beatnik, published in 1969, was admittedly semi-fictitious in response to the publisher Maurice Girodias‘frequent pleas to include “more sex.” Memories of my life as a woman: the New York years, published in 2001, presents a more measured account.

Philosopher on the hazards of fame and fortune, she is sometimes snubbed by literary festivals. “The reason was probably because she didn’t chat that much,” says Powell. “But if you were talking about Something, she was talking all night.

As di Prima said The poetry market, which she read aloud upon her induction in 2009 as the Poet Laureate at the San Francisco Public Library:

I would like my daily bread, however
you arrange it, and I would also like
to be bread, or food, for
others even after my departure.
A song they can walk a trail with.


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Oxford English Dictionary adds 26 new Korean words https://momentodada.com/oxford-english-dictionary-adds-26-new-korean-words/ https://momentodada.com/oxford-english-dictionary-adds-26-new-korean-words/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 05:19:07 +0000 https://momentodada.com/oxford-english-dictionary-adds-26-new-korean-words/ The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) has added 26 new words of Korean origin to its latest edition. “We are all riding the crest of the Korean wave, and this can be felt not only in film, music or fashion, but also in our language, as evidenced by some of the words and phrases of Korean […]]]>

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) has added 26 new words of Korean origin to its latest edition.

“We are all riding the crest of the Korean wave, and this can be felt not only in film, music or fashion, but also in our language, as evidenced by some of the words and phrases of Korean origin included in the latest update of the Oxford English Dictionary, ”reads an OED blog post.

The oldest K word in the OED update, of course, is the meaning of “K”, which is Korean. “First added to the OED in its 1933 supplement, the dictionary entry for Korean noun and adjectival uses has now been completely revised,” the statement said.

In the new update, Korean food looms large. The new entries include:

* banchan (first attested in 1938) – a small side dish of vegetables, etc., served with rice as part of a typical Korean meal.

* bulgogi (1958) – a dish of thin slices of beef or pork that are marinated and then grilled or sautéed.

* dongchimi (1962) – a type of kimchi made from radish and usually also containing napa cabbage.

* galbi (1958) – a dish of beef ribs, usually marinated in soy sauce, garlic and sugar, and sometimes cooked on a grill at the table.

* japchae (1955) – a dish consisting of cellophane noodles made from sweet potato starch, sautéed with vegetables and other ingredients, and usually seasoned with soy sauce and sesame oil.

The meaning of the most iconic Korean dish “kimchi” has also been revised. Other entries include the ‘hanbok’, a traditional Korean costume worn by both men and women, and Tang Soo Do, the Korean martial art.

Amid the growing frenzy surrounding Korean pop culture, two words – “Korean wave” and “hallyu” were also added to the dictionary. “Hallyu, a borrow from Korean, also means ‘Korean wave’ when literally translated, and it is now also used in English to refer to South Korean pop culture and entertainment itself, not just its growing popularity.” , mentions OED.

The dictionary adds, “The adoption and development of these Korean words in English also demonstrates how lexical innovation is no longer confined to traditional English centers in the UK and US – they show how Asians in different parts of the continent invent and exchange words in their own local contexts, then present those words to the rest of the English-speaking world… ”

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where to start with his literature – the Calvert Journal https://momentodada.com/where-to-start-with-his-literature-the-calvert-journal/ https://momentodada.com/where-to-start-with-his-literature-the-calvert-journal/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 12:54:47 +0000 https://momentodada.com/where-to-start-with-his-literature-the-calvert-journal/ “Writing has a certain similarity to the development of an image on a photographic plate. The photo is taken in the sun, and only with the help of sunlight, but to develop it requires complete darkness. (Conversations with Goya. Bridges. Signs.) Ivo Andrić was born in 1892 to a Croatian Catholic family in Bosnia, at […]]]>

“Writing has a certain similarity to the development of an image on a photographic plate. The photo is taken in the sun, and only with the help of sunlight, but to develop it requires complete darkness. (Conversations with Goya. Bridges. Signs.)

Ivo Andrić was born in 1892 to a Croatian Catholic family in Bosnia, at the time still under Austro-Hungarian rule. His father died when Andrić was still a toddler, so his mother sent him to live with an aunt and uncle in Višegrad, a town on the Drina whose bridge inspired a lifetime of writing.

As a young man, Andrić became a member of several political youth groups and befriended Gavrilo Princip, whose assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie in 1914 sparked the spark of the First World War. Andrić’s acquaintance with Princip guaranteed his arrest, and he spent most of the war in prison, under house arrest or under the rather relaxed supervision of the local Franciscan friars. Suffering from tuberculosis and too described as a “political threat” to be written, he spends his time reading and studying languages. After the war, this informal education was his route to diplomatic service.

His stint as a diplomat unfortunately meant going through a second war under surveillance, this time in a friend’s apartment in Belgrade throughout the German occupation. This period of near-imprisonment, however, was extremely productive for his writing. The books now considered his’ Bosnian trilogy were all published in Yugoslavia in 1945: The bridge over the Drina, Bosnian Chronicle (Where Travnik Chronicle), and Sarajevo Woman (extremely difficult to find in English for less than the cost of a round trip to the city itself).

The New York Times 1975 obituary because Andrić called his novels and his short stories resolutely dark. That’s right – his wisdom and joy evident in other human beings has been tempered by his experiences. Surviving two world wars and a diplomatic position in a tumultuous political landscape did not make Andrić jaded, but sent him into a sort of perpetual state of mourning. His books strive to highlight the beauty and complexity of human relationships, to lament our darkest inclinations for violence, alienation and deception.

Despite an exciting experience in the public sphere, Andrić was an exceptionally private person and remained baffled by his readers’ curiosity for his personal life. Referring to the possibility that his house would one day become a museum, he replied categorically: “There is nothing to see. It’s not like I’m Tolstoy and living in Yasnaya Polyana.

He eventually developed such an aversion to the singular pronoun I that he often spoke of himself in the first person plural. He was deeply opposed to the notion of heroes or strongmen, and filled his novels to the brim with minor characters and details of their lives. The story of each person was the story of others, of the community and of its relationship to history.

“On each book that represents a work of art and quality, we could write: ‘Stop of life mine and yours. (Conversations with Goya. Bridges. Signs)

Obtaining the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1961 not only popularized his work, but also opened cultural doors to Yugoslavia. True to form, Andrić donated all the prize money to buy books for libraries in Bosnia and Herzegovina. He died beloved and admired – and his apartment was indeed turned into a museum. Despite international recognition, many of his works have yet to be translated into English, highlighting a cruel lack of literary translation in the English-speaking world. Here is a selection of titles that show the extent of Andric’s work. In each you will find wisdom and humility, beauty and betrayal – and, most importantly, an antidote to individualism.



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Nobel Committee Chairman Anders Olsson on the Future of the Literature Prize https://momentodada.com/nobel-committee-chairman-anders-olsson-on-the-future-of-the-literature-prize/ https://momentodada.com/nobel-committee-chairman-anders-olsson-on-the-future-of-the-literature-prize/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 19:12:08 +0000 https://momentodada.com/nobel-committee-chairman-anders-olsson-on-the-future-of-the-literature-prize/ Funny, the Swedish Academy was founded a year before the US Constitution was ratified and it looks like you have the same difficulty interpreting an old government document as we do. Yes! [laughs] But that was only part of the problem. Another aspect of our work has been to modernize the organization of the Academy, […]]]>

Funny, the Swedish Academy was founded a year before the US Constitution was ratified and it looks like you have the same difficulty interpreting an old government document as we do.

Yes! [laughs] But that was only part of the problem. Another aspect of our work has been to modernize the organization of the Academy, in a sense. It works a lot better now, I think – it’s not as hierarchical anymore, as it was, for example, in the days of Sara Danius. [Danius, the first woman to lead the Nobel Literature Committee, was pushed out amid the sexual assault scandal in the 2017, despite the fact that she had no involvement in it.] Then we had problems with the management. Now I have the impression that we are much more at the same level within the Academy. So I think in many ways it’s a better and more functional Academy now than it was before the crisis.

The Academy has a deserved reputation for Eurocentrism. A black African writer hasn’t won it since 1986. If you awarded the Prize to a woman every year, there wouldn’t be parity until 2121, I believe. How seriously do you take these questions? Did these concerns arise as you reorganized the Nobel Prize after 2017?

Alfred Nobel, in his will, he wanted to have a universal price, very clearly. Writers from all over the world can be recipients of the award – men and women, people from all parts of the world can potentially win. It was very late, I think the Prize really had this universal scope in its history around the 1980s. We had writers from other continents than Europe, especially Africa and Asia. It was very Eurocentric in the early part of the 20th century and very few women won, as you say. But now, lately, I think there has been a tremendous change. Over the past 20 years, seven women have received the Award. We are moving forward, in the right direction. Also, in overall terms, I think things are changing all the time. The only way to do this is to have women in the Academy, to really develop a more gender sensitive reading of the candidates. Second, we now have experts from all over the world. And we try more systematically to make contact with. From January next year, these experts will give us reports on linguistic areas that we do not have in-depth competence within the Academy: Asia and Africa, languages ​​that we do not master. , but which we want to control. It will be a very interesting change and it will expand our knowledge and focus in the world literature.


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A person of many shades https://momentodada.com/a-person-of-many-shades/ https://momentodada.com/a-person-of-many-shades/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 21:36:49 +0000 https://momentodada.com/a-person-of-many-shades/ My hands are shaking and my heart is pounding as I write you a tribute. What am I going to write about you, how much can I write? How much will my grief allow me to write? The haze of memories weighs heavily on my heart as I write this. Everything I write will not […]]]>

My hands are shaking and my heart is pounding as I write you a tribute. What am I going to write about you, how much can I write? How much will my grief allow me to write? The haze of memories weighs heavily on my heart as I write this. Everything I write will not do justice to your illustrious personality.

I am proud to be the daughter of a person whose absence is not only felt by her family but also by the people of the nation. Such was his endearing nature. Even as a child, I could see how he let go of his scholarly self and become one with children, and respectful of elders. No one who has met him will complain about being treated disrespectfully; he would recognize everyone. He would treat his daughter-in-law like his own daughters and his sons-in-law like his own sons. To me he was a friend, a loved one, a father, a mentor and a guide all at the same time.

People talk about my father’s love for poetry, art and literature and they will continue to talk about his pioneering work in the field of poetry, art and literature, especially for the promotion and preservation of the Kashmiri language. He was tireless and indefatigable in his quest for literature and art, always consumed by the desire to fulfill the mission he had given himself. Countless times he would get up in the middle of a meal after a long, tiring day to attend to a chore or someone related to conservation work. His food, sleep and rest were the language, art and literature of Kashmir.

I overheard my father while he spoke at various literary and cultural functions and noticed how he left audiences spellbound with his oratory. He could speak at length at any impromptu forum keeping the audience engaged all the time. However, he never coated his words or hesitated to take a stand. Nothing could stop him from expressing himself, and yet he never turned rude. Even with his fiercest critics, he was polite and respectful, agreeing to disagree and resolutely avoiding forcing his opinions on them.

While serving as secretary of the Academy of Arts, Culture and Languages ​​of Jammu and Kashmir from June 2015 to March 2019, the academy was buzzing with activities and events. A record number of cultural and literary events and seminars were held during his tenure in Jammu as well as Kashmir. The Tagore Hall in Srinagar and the Abhinav Theater in Jammu were chock-full of art and literature lovers. I’ve heard people say it was the golden age of the cultural history academy. This was only possible thanks to his willingness to do more for the cultural heritage of Jammu and Kashmir.

In March 2020, when the Covid-19 pandemic broke out, my father, unaccustomed to sitting at home for long hours, was gravely disturbed at being homebound. This impacted her work and her health much worse than any other. He has been busy writing, attending webinars, online meetings, and spending quality time with his grandchildren. However, the disaster happened soon. One evening in July 2020, he was sitting in the lawns of our house with my mom sipping tea, when she noticed that his eyes were rather pale, and that he wasn’t quite looking at himself. . At her insistence, he reluctantly underwent a medical examination and diagnostic tests were performed. News of the dreaded disease that had afflicted him came like a thunderclap. We were devastated and everything changed. But again, he rose to the challenge. Not only did he calmly accept it, but he also advised us from day one to be reconciled and accept the impending reality. For him, it was Allah’s will and it was his duty to submit and accept what had been ordered – anything else would be blasphemous and unacceptable to him. As a result, he never betrayed any sign of pain or distress, but he patiently advised us and any visitors who came to inquire about his health to be patient. When disease invaded his body and reality drew closer, he withdrew from the world and set his sights on the afterlife. Yet when a delegation from Adbee Markaz Kamraz – one of the valley’s leading literary organizations, came to visit to inquire about their boss’s health, he made sure to extract their promise that they would spare no effort to continue his legacy and mission.

Despite the illness, he gathered the energy to appear in public for the last time in our hometown Hajin on “Mohi ud Din Hajini Day”. He spoke as if he was perfectly healthy, without a jarring note, his voice full of passion and love for the place. He said and I quote “Whenever I visit Hajin, I feel like a girl visiting her parents’ house.” Such was his love and affection for the place and the people of Hajin. He was strongly linked to his roots.

Despite my grief after his passing, I couldn’t help but feel the pride and joy that my father was known to so many people and loved by people from all walks of life. So many supporters comforted us during these difficult times and no one needed any assurance to notice that their grief was sincere and sincere.

The bond I shared with my father was unlike any other bond. Dad, I love you for endless reasons. I feel so blessed to have you as a father and I am grateful for the wonderful education you have given me. You were a wonderful man, a loyal and loving husband, a devoted father and a true friend. Know that my gratitude is endless and continues to grow with each passing day. Thank you for being an overprotective father from my childhood until today. Thank you for teaching me the importance of humility.

Thank you for showing me what it means to be a good man, a great teacher, an amazing husband and an amazing father for the last years of my life.

I seek the magfirate of Allah for you and may you find the highest place in the jannah.


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Lehman College Hosts New York International Book Fair October 1-3 https://momentodada.com/lehman-college-hosts-new-york-international-book-fair-october-1-3/ https://momentodada.com/lehman-college-hosts-new-york-international-book-fair-october-1-3/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 00:43:59 +0000 https://momentodada.com/lehman-college-hosts-new-york-international-book-fair-october-1-3/ By SÍLE MOLONEY The New York City International Book Fair / Feria Internacional del Libro NYC will take place from October 1-3, 2021. Image courtesy of Lehman College First launched in 2019, the New York International Book Fair / Feria Internacional del Libro NYC, an initiative of the CUNY Mexican Studies Institute, aims to disseminate […]]]>

By SÍLE MOLONEY

The New York City International Book Fair / Feria Internacional del Libro NYC will take place from October 1-3, 2021.
Image courtesy of Lehman College

First launched in 2019, the New York International Book Fair / Feria Internacional del Libro NYC, an initiative of the CUNY Mexican Studies Institute, aims to disseminate academic and literary work published in Spanish, whether in Latin America, in the Caribbean, Spain or the United States and, at the same time, promote better reading habits among Hispanic communities in New York.

This year’s panels and virtual events, taking place October 1-3, will be streamed live on Facebook Live through the @FILNYC account. Last year, the event brought together academics and authors from more than a dozen countries, with more than 48,000 people attending conferences, panels and virtual workshops.

The program includes the following highlights. Call (347) 577 4080 for more information. To view past events, click here, for example.

Interview with Cristina Rivera-Garza
Friday October 1
1:15 p.m. EST

Marco Ramírez Rojas, assistant professor of Spanish at Lehman, will host a conference with Rivera-Garza, a prolific and award-winning Mexican writer. Rivera-Garza is the author of six novels, three collections of short stories, five collections of poetry and three books of non-fiction. Originally written in Spanish, his work has been translated into several languages, including English, Portuguese and Korean.

How the New York Times speaks to a diverse audience
Saturday October 2
10:00 a.m. (EST)

The New York Times is the third most read newspaper in the United States. In this panel, four Spanish-speaking journalists – Elda Cantú, Annie Correal, Andrés R. Martínez and José Enrique Arrioja – discuss the challenges faced and the strategies followed by NYT to reach an increasingly diverse audience, in the United States and in the ‘foreigner. .

Racism and marginalization
Saturday October 2
12:00 p.m. (EST)

Araceli Tinajero teaches at the Graduate Center (Hispanic Literatures) and is co-founder of the Mexico study group at the Bildner Center for Western Hemisphere Studies where she has been a scholar for over a decade. In this panel, voices from Argentina, Mexico, Peru and Spain will dialogue on the role that racism, identity, representation and marginalization play in contemporary literature, and how literature can contribute to it. remedy.

Describe the border, write on the border
Saturday October 2
1:00 p.m. (EST)

Daniel R. Fernández is Associate Professor at Lehman College and Chairman of the Department of Languages ​​and Literature. He will be joined by Sonia Robles, Norma Iglesias Prieto and Daniel Salinas Basave to analyze the meaning and scope of the border between Mexico and the United States as an environment of struggles and challenges as well as creative and daring proposals in a battle continues to defend human dignity.

Are we going to cross the time barrier in the United States?
Saturday October 2
2:00 p.m. (EST)

Adriana Pacheco is a Mexican Affiliate Researcher at LLILAS Benson and a member of the International Advisory Board of the University of Texas at Austin. She will guide the conversation with Fernando Olszanski (Argentina), Pedro Medina (Peru) and María Angélica García (Venezuela) regarding the rise of Hispanic literature around the world, as well as new strategies for selling books and getting to know the reader. .

America Fantastic
Saturday October 2
3:00 p.m. (EST)

Mariano Villareal, administrator of “Literatura Fantástica”, a website specializing in novelties on fantasy literature and science fiction in Spain and renowned anthologist, will guide a panel on the relevance, trends and interests around fantasy literature and science fiction in Latin America. Mariano is joined by a large constellation of authors, namely Edmundo Paz Soldán (Bolivia), Daína Chaviano (Cuba), Martín Felipe Castagnet (Argentina) and Teresa López-Pellisa (Spain).

Between the breath and the abyss
Saturday October 2
4:00 p.m. (EST)

Between the Breath and the Abyss: Poétique sur la beauté (Entre el aliento y el precipicio: poéticas sobre la belleza) is a bilingual anthology that brings together the ideas of a select group of authors on the presence of beauty in poetry And life. For this panel, Nuria Morgado, Associate Professor of Contemporary Spanish Literature at the College of Staten Island and the Graduate Center, will lead the quartet of talented voices formed by Raquel Abend (Venezuela), Odette Alonso (Cuba), Keila Vall de la Valle (Venezuela ) and Silvia Guerra (Uruguay).

Documentary projection: Change subject
Saturday October 2
5 p.m. EST

Change the Subject presents the story of a group of university students committed to advancing and promoting the rights and dignity of undocumented people from their earliest days at Dartmouth College. Triggered by an example of anti-immigrant sentiment in their library catalog, these students took their advocacy from the Dartmouth Library to the halls of Congress. The film shows how an example of campus activism entered national limelight and how a cataloging term became a flashpoint in the immigration debate on Capitol Hill. Melissa Castillo Planas, assistant professor in the English department at Lehman, has been a film producer.

Interview with Liliana Colanzi
Sunday October 3
1 p.m. EST

Antonio Córdoba Cornejo, associate professor at Manhattan College specializing in science fiction in Spanish, leads a conversation with Colanzi, a Bolivian writer, editor and journalist whose research focuses on genres such as science fiction, horror and fantastic in modernity. and contemporary Latin American literature.

Location Information:
Broadcast on Facebook Live via the @FILNYC account


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Nobel Prize season returns Monday with pandemic backdrop https://momentodada.com/nobel-prize-season-returns-monday-with-pandemic-backdrop/ https://momentodada.com/nobel-prize-season-returns-monday-with-pandemic-backdrop/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 07:41:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/nobel-prize-season-returns-monday-with-pandemic-backdrop/ Launched 120 years ago, medicine, physics, chemistry, literature and peace prizes created by Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel, as well as the most recent economics prize, will be awarded in Stockholm and Oslo from October 4-11. While the list of candidates is a closely guarded secret, Nobel Prize winning experts say research on messenger RNA (mRNA), […]]]>

Launched 120 years ago, medicine, physics, chemistry, literature and peace prizes created by Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel, as well as the most recent economics prize, will be awarded in Stockholm and Oslo from October 4-11.

While the list of candidates is a closely guarded secret, Nobel Prize winning experts say research on messenger RNA (mRNA), which forms the basis of Pfizer / BioNTech and Moderna Covid-19 vaccines, is a favorite for the drug or chemistry prize.

“It would be a mistake if the Nobel Committee did not award the prize to mRNA vaccine technology, “Swedish science journalist Ulrika Bjorksten told AFP.

She cited as possible laureates Katalin Kariko from Hungary and Drew Weissman from the United States, whose pioneering research led directly to the first mRNA vaccines.

These have been injected into over a billion people around the world in a race to mitigate a pandemic that claimed the lives of more than 4.7 million people.

Kariko and Weissman have already received several distinctions, including the Lasker Prize in the United States, often considered a precursor of the Nobel.

Other areas that could be honored include cellular communication, functioning of the immune system, the discovery of the breast cancer gene, epigenetics and antibiotic resistance.

The Medicine Prize opens the Nobel season on Monday, followed by the awards ceremony for physics on Tuesday, chemistry on Wednesday, literature on Thursday and peace Friday.

The economics prize closes the Nobel season on October 11.

Peace price for the climate?

Among those who make the buzz for the price of peace, the only one to be awarded in Oslo – are the watchdogs of the media, Belarusian opposition leaders and the climate activists, such as Swedish activist Greta Thunberg.

The image of the prestigious award has been hit hard in recent years, as one of its previous laureates, Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, has become embroiled in a war.

Another, Burmese Aung San Suu Kyi, was accused of defending the massacre members of the Rohingya minority.

Last year, the World Food Program won.

There is speculation that climate activists are next in line as the world suffers a torrent of deadly weather disasters, melting asphalt from heat waves to flash floods and indomitable forest fires.

“This is the most important question right now,” said Nobel historian Asle Sveen.

Other experts believe that the time may have come for organizations struggling to freedom of information and the rights of journalists, such as Reporters Without Borders or the Committee to Protect Journalists.

The non-violent opposition to the autocratic regime in Belarus, led by Svetlana Tikhanovskaya is also considered a worthy winner.

Although previously considered favorites, the World Health Organization and the The Covax vaccine sharing program has been hampered by the slow distribution of jabs to poor countries.

“Discover a genius”

For the literature prize, to be announced on Thursday, punters suggested the Swedish Academy can look further after honoring several and North American winners.

“I believe they really want to discover a genius from an elder neglected area, ”said Jonas Thente, literary critic for the Swedish daily Dagens. Nyheter.

He suggested “someone with a primary interest in the intercultural experiences ”, as Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, 44, born in Nigeria.

“She’s probably too young, but she would fit the profile.”

Some names have been circulating in literary circles in Stockholm since years – Hungarian Peter Nadas, Canadian Margaret Atwood, Syrian poet Adonis and Somali author Nuruddin Farah.

New names to emerge include Indian Vikram Seth and Chinese Liao Yiwu. and Mozambican writer Mia Couto.

Last year, the honor went to the American poet Louise Gluck.

While the names of Nobel laureates are kept secret until the last minute, the Nobel Foundation has already announced that the glittering prize ceremony and banquet organized in Stockholm in December for science and the literature laureates will not take place this year due to the pandemic.

Like last year, the winners will receive their prizes in their country of origin.

A decision has not yet been made on the Peace Prize ceremony to be held in Oslo. This year’s winners take 10 million Swedish kronor (just under one million euros, $ 1.13 million), to be shared if more than one person is honored in a discipline.


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Ditch literature, history books and embrace the hustle and bustle of start-ups: CEOs https://momentodada.com/ditch-literature-history-books-and-embrace-the-hustle-and-bustle-of-start-ups-ceos/ https://momentodada.com/ditch-literature-history-books-and-embrace-the-hustle-and-bustle-of-start-ups-ceos/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/ditch-literature-history-books-and-embrace-the-hustle-and-bustle-of-start-ups-ceos/ A world-famous CEO on Tuesday called on world leaders to ditch literature and history books in schools and colleges in favor of teaching startup operations, technological innovations and overall profitability. The British tycoon insisted that the perfect combination of applied science and business would teach teenagers how to hit industry with scientific innovation and grow […]]]>

A world-famous CEO on Tuesday called on world leaders to ditch literature and history books in schools and colleges in favor of teaching startup operations, technological innovations and overall profitability.

The British tycoon insisted that the perfect combination of applied science and business would teach teenagers how to hit industry with scientific innovation and grow their business to make huge profits.

“You want to be part of those 0.00000000001 percent who own more than 60 percent of the economic pie,” he said. “Motivation is a divine gift, but the culture of agile work is being built. Remember, those who invest in the wealth of others through innovative start-ups are the ones who are successful. It’s time for world leaders to prepare our children for the future! “

He also said that most people are lazy and use their brains for the imagination without taking action. “Not everyone who has ‘MS Excelle’ in the tech industry has enough time to read or practice literature. The richest people on the planet are investors, shareholders in tech giants, and online business owners. Apart from our own country’s own JK Rowling of whom we are not very proud, there is not an author or literary man who has made a fortune, “he wrote in his tweet.

“Those who read the story hold a grudge, and those who read the literature are mad and depressed – there, I said it,” added the scientist. “The way to go is commerce, eh?” “

When a Twitter user asked if his focus on start-ups and investing had anything to do with his investment in a certain company that is currently on life support in Chapasthan, the guru replied that the question simply ignored his advice to ignore the story and quickly blocked the user.


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