Literature – Momento Dada http://momentodada.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 14:06:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://momentodada.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T222814.835-150x150.png Literature – Momento Dada http://momentodada.com/ 32 32 Military Literature Festival in Chandigarh on December 3 and 4 https://momentodada.com/military-literature-festival-in-chandigarh-on-december-3-and-4/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 13:23:16 +0000 https://momentodada.com/military-literature-festival-in-chandigarh-on-december-3-and-4/ Chandigarh, Nov 23 (IANS): The sixth Military Literature Festival (MLF) in Chandigarh, organized in partnership between the government of Punjab, the administration of Chandigarh and the western command of the Indian army, will be held on December 3-4, it has been announced. Wednesday. The event will be inaugurated by the Governor of Punjab and […]]]>

Chandigarh, Nov 23 (IANS): The sixth Military Literature Festival (MLF) in Chandigarh, organized in partnership between the government of Punjab, the administration of Chandigarh and the western command of the Indian army, will be held on December 3-4, it has been announced. Wednesday.

The event will be inaugurated by the Governor of Punjab and Administrator of Chandigarh, Banwarilal Purohit, on December 3. It will be followed by panel discussions on topics of national and international interest and strategic affairs and conversations between authors and speakers, the Military Literature Festival Association said. Chairman, Lieutenant General TS Shergill.

A few new books will also be published. There will be book stalls, martial dances will be held, weapons and military equipment displayed on the shores of Chandigarh’s scenic Sukhna Lake.

Punjab Chief Minister Bhagwant Mann will lift the curtain on the festival at the closing ceremony on December 4.

To commemorate the 75th anniversary of independence and the services of the Armed Forces in the preservation of freedom, the theme of MLF this year is “The Armed Forces: Serving Free India for 75 Years”.

After two years of a pandemic-induced online format, this time the festival is returning to the physical event at its venue, the Lake Club.

The MLF was launched in 2017 by the Governor of Punjab, Vice President Singh Badnore, and the Chief Minister, Captain Amarinder Singh, a well-known military historian.

Over the years it has become a leading international gathering of military historians, thinkers, strategic analysts and writers to discuss and talk about war, history and intellectual pursuits.

In addition, to spread the festival’s message on fitness, sports, say no to drugs, national security, pay tribute to martyrs and give direction to youth, a number of events like a motorcycle rally, a horse show, a polo match, a shotgun and archery competitions, golf tournament, etc., take place.

In parallel, Bravehearts’ Ride, bringing together more than 600 bikers, will be held on November 27. This year, the event is dedicated to the memory and in tribute to the martyrs of the 1962 war whose 60th anniversary has just ended.

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The languages ​​of literature in Cyprus will resonate at the next book fair in Limassol https://momentodada.com/the-languages-of-literature-in-cyprus-will-resonate-at-the-next-book-fair-in-limassol/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 05:29:59 +0000 https://momentodada.com/the-languages-of-literature-in-cyprus-will-resonate-at-the-next-book-fair-in-limassol/ What promises to be an engaging discussion of the various languages ​​claiming a place in Cypriot literature will take place on Saturday November 26, at the Carob Mills siteas part of the inaugural edition of Limassol Book Fair. The panel will be moderated by the poet Stephanos Stephanidesformer professor of comparative literature at the University […]]]>

What promises to be an engaging discussion of the various languages ​​claiming a place in Cypriot literature will take place on Saturday November 26, at the Carob Mills siteas part of the inaugural edition of Limassol Book Fair. The panel will be moderated by the poet Stephanos Stephanidesformer professor of comparative literature at the University of Cyprus.

Stephanides invited four writers and translators, Cypriots by birth or naturalization, to discuss how their emotional immersion in felt life has shaped their experience of this island. Alev Adil, Lisa Suhair Majaj, Despina Pirketti and Dalia Staponkutì all addressed issues such as the contribution of a diasporic, migrant and hybrid subject to our understanding of literature. In their combined practice as writers and translators between Greek, English, Turkish, Arabic, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian and Russian, the panelists negotiated their way through the movement of real and symbolic powers, often establishing a flow between various groups not coerced or constrained by the nation-state.

“As the role of the nation-state in the global system changes,” says Stephanide, “new hegemonies and orthodoxies are emerging as we move into a new world order that brings with it new forces of singularity, homogenization , of technological rationality in the global experience, in supranational states What new challenges does this bring to the practice of writing and translation?

Panelists

Alev Adil is a writer, performance artist and scholar. His poetry has been included in many anthologies of Cypriot poetry in English, Greek and Turkish. Adil’s review for Times Literary Supplementis associate editor of the literary journal critical muslim, and contributor and co-editor of Nicosia Beyond Barriers: Voices from a Divided City (2019).

Lisa Suhair Majaj is a Palestinian-American who has lived in Cyprus since 2001. She is the author of Geographies of Light (winner of the Del Sol Press Poetry Prize), poems and essays in numerous journals and anthologies, and two children’s books. She is also a scholar of Arab-American literature and co-editor of three volumes of critical essays on international women writers.

Despina Pirketti is a literary translator between Greek, English and French, and the author of a novel and two plays. She is currently working on the Greek translation of “Letters from Cyprus”, a group of poems written by the English poet Martin Bell during his stay on the island in the late 1960s.

Dalia Staponkutì is an award-winning Lithuanian writer, translator and scholar. She translated N. Kazantzakis, I. Kampanellis, CP Cavafy, P. Ioannides. Currently she is working on a side story novel titled Viva Reginaembracing the medieval history of Cyprus and Lithuania.

Stephanos Stephanides is a poet, essayist and memoirist, translator, ethnographer and documentary filmmaker. He received the first prize for poetry from the American Anthropological Association, 1988, and the first prize for video poetry for his film Poets in no man’s land (Nicosia International Film Festival, 2012). He was a judge for the Commonwealth Writers Prize (2000, 2010, 2022).

“Languages ​​of Literature in Cyprus: Migration and Translation” panel will run on the Main stage of the Limassol Book Fair, November 26, 2:30 p.m. Presentations will be made in English. The discussion with the public will take place in Greek and English.

The Limassol Book Fair is made up of a diverse group of individuals aspiring to create a lasting impact on the cultural identity of the island and region. Its founders are Haris Ioannides, Anna Ioannidou and Kris Konnaris.

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Children’s literature can no longer be simple: Emirati writer | Daily Express Online https://momentodada.com/childrens-literature-can-no-longer-be-simple-emirati-writer-daily-express-online/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 05:22:22 +0000 https://momentodada.com/childrens-literature-can-no-longer-be-simple-emirati-writer-daily-express-online/ Children’s literature can no longer be simple: Emirati writer Published on: Saturday, November 12, 2022 From: Sherell Jeffrey Text size: Children’s book author Rama Kanawati shares her thoughts at the book fair. Sharjah: Emirati writer and critic Dr. Fatima Al-Ma’amari says children today are overwhelmed with information and need more than just stories to keep […]]]>

Children’s literature can no longer be simple: Emirati writer

Published on: Saturday, November 12, 2022

From: Sherell Jeffrey

Text size:


Children’s book author Rama Kanawati shares her thoughts at the book fair.

Sharjah: Emirati writer and critic Dr. Fatima Al-Ma’amari says children today are overwhelmed with information and need more than just stories to keep their brains active. (SIBF), she emphasized the need for adaptability in children’s books. She said kids today can be anything they want, but it often confuses them.

“In a world flooded with information, children’s literature should help them make the right choices,” she said, referring to the need to stimulate young brains intellectually, emotionally and psychologically. She also said more visually and verbally engaging literature is needed to help children deal with today’s issues, adding that the creativity in a child’s head is crucial. Children’s book author Rama Kanawati said that ideas in children’s books are very different from reality.

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“Telling stories is not enough to match the imagination of young minds. Globalization and the technological revolution have made young people less interested in learning new things. “The world we live in today is very different from what you see in children’s books. “As children have more choices, their minds change and books need to reflect that,” she said.

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MDC’s Learning Resources Department Wins Prestigious Will Eisner Graphic Novel Growth Grant for Libraries https://momentodada.com/mdcs-learning-resources-department-wins-prestigious-will-eisner-graphic-novel-growth-grant-for-libraries/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 17:29:42 +0000 https://momentodada.com/mdcs-learning-resources-department-wins-prestigious-will-eisner-graphic-novel-growth-grant-for-libraries/ Miami, November 9, 2022 – Miami Dade College‘s (MDC) Educational Resources Department received a national honor 2022 Will Eisner Graphic Novel Growth Grant for Libraries, which provides support to libraries wishing to expand their existing graphic novel services and programs. This grant will help fund “Mirror, Mirror: Seeing Us in Graphic Novels,” a project developed […]]]>

Miami, November 9, 2022 – Miami Dade College‘s (MDC) Educational Resources Department received a national honor 2022 Will Eisner Graphic Novel Growth Grant for Libraries, which provides support to libraries wishing to expand their existing graphic novel services and programs.

This grant will help fund “Mirror, Mirror: Seeing Us in Graphic Novels,” a project developed by Erick Dominicis, Victor Calderin, Teresa Cusidor, Isabel Duque, Dennis Edelen, Adrian Legaspi, Christina Machado-Dillon, Jenny Saxton and the MDC Graphic Novel Groupa collection of faculty, administrators, and college-wide staff dedicated to promoting graphic literature and its use for interdisciplinary education, social awareness, and personal enrichment.

“Mirror, Mirror: Seeing Ourselves in Graphic Novels” focuses on the idea that discussing and creating sequential art focused on body image can help the College’s diverse student population deal with racism, sexism , ableism and other societal pressures. The project includes plans for a series of events that encourage students to share their own stories in graphic novel form during the Spring 2023 term.

The prize includes $2,000 to purchase graphic novels for MDC Libraries, $1,000 to support a series of graphic novel-themed events, and $1,000 for a representative from MDC Learning Resources to attend. the grand reception at the American Library Association’s annual conference in Washington, D.C. Additionally, MDC Libraries will receive approximately 175 books valued at $3,000, including a selection by and about Will Eisner, and a collection of titles winners of this year’s Will Eisner Awards at Comic-Con International.

Sponsored by the Will and Ann Eisner Family Foundation and administered by the Graphic Novels & Comics Round Table of the American Library Association, the Will Eisner Graphic Novel Grant for Libraries encourages public awareness of the rise and importance of graphic literature, sequential art and comics as a literary medium. Will Eisner (1917-2005) is considered one of the most influential creators of comic books and graphic novels and is best known for his comic book series The mind.

For more information on the Graphic Novel Groupthe Graphic Novel Book Club or the Will Eisner Graphic Novel Scholarship for Libraries, please contact MDC Kendall Campus Faculty Librarian Jenny Saxton at 305-237-2075, or jsaxton@mdc.edu.

About the Will and Ann Eisner Family Foundation

The Will and Ann Eisner Family Foundation encourages innovation and creativity in graphic literature, sequential art, and comics. It encourages others to continue and build on the legacy of Will Eisner, who pioneered the development of visual storytelling and comic book language. Will Eisner is best known for being the creator of The Spirit comic book, for developing comic books for education and training, and for writing the first modern graphic novel. For more information about Will Eisner, visit www.willeisner.com.

About the Graphic Novels and Comics Roundtable

The American Library Association’s Graphic Novels and Comics Roundtable is dedicated to supporting library staff in all aspects of engagement with graphic novels and comics, including collection development, programming and advocacy. For more information, connect with GNCRT on Facebook: ALA Graphic Novels & Comics Round Table; Twitter: @libcomix; Instagram: @libcomix; or the GNCRT ALA Connect page.

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Basavanna comes to life through drama and literature – The New Indian Express https://momentodada.com/basavanna-comes-to-life-through-drama-and-literature-the-new-indian-express/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 20:46:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/basavanna-comes-to-life-through-drama-and-literature-the-new-indian-express/ By Express press service BENGALURUCHITRADURGA: The social reformer Basavanna gave equal treatment to all sections of the hierarchical caste system. He did not just unite different castes but also treated women equally by rejecting exclusivist Vedic systems, Union Minister Shobha Karandlaje said here at the ongoing National Theater Festival in Sanehalli, Chitradurga. Invoking Basavanna and […]]]>

By Express press service

BENGALURUCHITRADURGA: The social reformer Basavanna gave equal treatment to all sections of the hierarchical caste system. He did not just unite different castes but also treated women equally by rejecting exclusivist Vedic systems, Union Minister Shobha Karandlaje said here at the ongoing National Theater Festival in Sanehalli, Chitradurga.

Invoking Basavanna and Narayana Guru, Karandlaje said that Karnataka gave the concept of equality to the whole world. Sanehalli Mutt strives to convey Basavanna’s philosophy to society through drama, art and literature, she said. ”.

Water Resources Minister Govind Karjol said social reformer Basavanna had to leave his home in the name of women and women’s equality. He prioritized the creation of a classless society and built a “Lingayat religion” to eradicate exploitation.

It is unfortunate that even after 900 years, we have not been able to build an ideal classless and casteless society, he added. Former Supreme Court Justice Justice Gopala Gowda said that although the Constitution provides equality for girls, neither governments nor the judiciary have failed to bring about equality.

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Understanding the virtues of the Robinson-Patman Act requires understanding when it is most effective https://momentodada.com/understanding-the-virtues-of-the-robinson-patman-act-requires-understanding-when-it-is-most-effective/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 10:01:27 +0000 https://momentodada.com/understanding-the-virtues-of-the-robinson-patman-act-requires-understanding-when-it-is-most-effective/ The literature on the benefits of the Robinson-Patman Act for consumer welfare is often conflicting. Professors Roman Inderst and Tommaso Valletti argue that sifting through the nuances of literature and identifying where and how Robinson-Patman is most effective is essential to any discussion of his revival. Recent discussions of a possible revival of the Robinson-Patman […]]]>

The literature on the benefits of the Robinson-Patman Act for consumer welfare is often conflicting. Professors Roman Inderst and Tommaso Valletti argue that sifting through the nuances of literature and identifying where and how Robinson-Patman is most effective is essential to any discussion of his revival.


Recent discussions of a possible revival of the Robinson-Patman Act (RPA) of 1936 which prohibited suppliers from charging businesses different prices for the same goods have rekindled interest in the economic implications of price discrimination on intermediate goods (wholesale) markets. For years, RPA enforcement has been lukewarm, likely because the Supreme Court has made it very difficult to bring a case. Conversely, the theoretical literature on input price discrimination has flourished. Empirical analyzes also exist, although they are fewer in number and their conclusions are often limited to particular industries. The debates and literature on input price discrimination are rich, seemingly contradictory and often overlooked by policy concerns. Our review of the literature is incomplete, but we hope to draw from its arguments two important contributions on the implications of input price discrimination for competition among retailers. First, we illustrate the impossibility of arriving at confident positions for or against price discrimination based on the diverse and complex assumptions and implications of the literature. In a second step, we discuss ideas from this literature that may be particularly relevant to the current debate.

To understand an important counterpoint to RPA, imagine a manufacturer that offers retailers different terms and conditions justified not only by manufacturer efficiency, such as different distribution costs or economies of scale. In much of the economics literature, these input price differences are due to the manufacturer charging a higher price to the retailer because the retailer can bear the higher costs with a strong customer base or its own efficiencies. In other words, the manufacturer tends to charge higher prices to more powerful buyers. Imposing a uniform pricing requirement would effectively protect a more efficient retailer from a manufacturer’s attempt to capture a larger share of those gains.

This picture is quite different from the concerns of powerful retailers persuading manufacturers to sell them goods at lower prices that seem to underpin RPA. Therefore, to adequately capture these practices and concerns, an economic framework relevant to the discussion of RPA should capture “buyer power” or how the most powerful buyers, i.e. , for example, those who act as gatekeepers for certain customers or who order a much larger volume than rivals, get better deals from manufacturers under input price discrimination.

The input price discrimination literature also differs significantly in how it models contracts between manufacturer and retailers, which yields varying effects on competition in the downstream retailer market. When researchers stipulate sufficiently complex contracts in their models (often in the form of “two-part tariffs”, in which the price of a good or service consists of two parts: a fixed price and a marginal unit payment), the exercise of buyer power may even be inconsequential for downstream competition between retailers. For example, if a retailer with significant buyer power derives a larger share of the channel’s total profits through a lump sum payment, in these models these are not passed on to end consumers. Thus, the exercise of bargaining power resulting in better general conditions does not in this case generate a competitive advantage in the downstream market.

Similarly, if all retailers obtain the same marginal wholesale price, they will operate on an equal footing in the downstream market. In another scenario, a retailer may benefit from a reduction in the quantity purchased, which would even benefit downstream competitors. Again, these scenarios don’t seem to align with current debates about an RPA overhaul.

“This implies that the debate should focus on how mandatory uniform pricing protects the weaker retailer who would otherwise be disadvantaged.”

In practice, stronger retailers can indeed obtain better terms and conditions in various forms, including lump sum payments such as listing fees. The resulting competitive advantage may then be less evident than when a retailer negotiates a lower unit wholesale price. How the terms and conditions of contracts vary, especially by industry, is therefore important. Nevertheless, to address the potential competition concerns covered by RPA, it seems appropriate to learn from models in which successful negotiations between a manufacturer and a retailer ultimately lead to competitive advantage in the downstream market. This implies that the debate should focus on how mandatory uniform pricing protects the weaker retailer who would otherwise be disadvantaged. In such a scenario, various contributions in the literature have identified the conditions under which consumer welfare increases with uniform prices.

It is also instructive to note in these models the following dynamic when (re-)introducing price discrimination. A more powerful retailer manages to obtain a lower wholesale price, which in turn allows him to gain market share. If bargaining power derives from larger volumes, perhaps because the retailer can more credibly threaten to switch to another source of supply, this implies that rivals are both losing market share and are weakened in their own negotiation with the manufacturer. This drives up their own wholesale price. We have shown that such a “waterbed effect” is more likely to negatively affect consumer welfare when the strategic advantage of the stronger retailer is already more pronounced and when market shares are consequently sufficiently asymmetric.

However, the imposition of uniform pricing can also trigger a dynamic that is detrimental to consumer welfare. If a manufacturer is not constrained by the ability of retailers to source elsewhere, the prohibition of discriminatory practices can protect it from the demands of a powerful retailer, which drives up all wholesale prices. Moreover, if retailers can no longer leverage their investments in lower wholesale prices, for example through customer retention, their incentives to invest will diminish. In a dynamic retail landscape, such inefficiencies can thwart the more immediate benefits of uniform pricing. When positive market momentum is maintained primarily through price discrimination, such that even a strong retailer is subject to future competition from entrants or new retail formats, the risk that a possible spiral of wholesale price differentials cements market power should also be much weaker.

The analysis of a prohibition of price discrimination caused by “buyer power” must therefore be limited to markets where it is likely to significantly reinforce existing significant competitive asymmetries, where it is unlikely to curb incentives to invest and where a strong incumbent is unlikely to face competition from entrants or new retail and shopping formats. Such asymmetries and lock-in effects can arise, for example, in brick-and-mortar grocery retail when the entry or expansion of smaller rivals is hampered by zoning requirements. With regard to online retail, such asymmetries, which are then reinforced by the exercise of buyer power, can result, for example, from higher quality data, consumer inclination for the single accommodation or the grouping of different services.

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Hernan Diaz and Tanaïs among winners of $50,000 Kirkus Prize https://momentodada.com/hernan-diaz-and-tanais-among-winners-of-50000-kirkus-prize/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 10:20:02 +0000 https://momentodada.com/hernan-diaz-and-tanais-among-winners-of-50000-kirkus-prize/ Hernan Diaz’s novel “Trust”, a postmodern vision of wealth, Powerful and reality set in the 1920s and 1930s, won the Kirkus Prize for Fiction. The awards, presented by trade publication Kirkus Reviews, include $50,000 cash prizes for winners in fiction, nonfiction and young reader literature. TRUST by Hernan Diaz, IN SENSORIUM by Tanaïs and HIMAWARI […]]]>

Hernan Diaz’s novel “Trust”, a postmodern vision of wealth, Powerful and reality set in the 1920s and 1930s, won the Kirkus Prize for Fiction.

The awards, presented by trade publication Kirkus Reviews, include $50,000 cash prizes for winners in fiction, nonfiction and young reader literature.

On Thursday, award judges cited Diaz for how “he uses multiple perspectives and forms to push the boundaries of what a novel can do.”

“What seems to begin as a homage to Roaring Twenties novels unfolds with each successive layer in a complex story of power, love and the nature of truth,” the judges said.

The writer and perfumer Tanaïs’ memory “In Sensorium” won for non-fiction. The book was praised by the judges for its “boldness, inventiveness, vision and lyrical eloquence”. The Young Readers Award went to Harmony Becker for the graphic novel “Himawari House,” which the judges honored for “its insightful exploration of emotionally resonant and enduring themes related to family, friendship and identity. “.

Finalists included ‘The Books of Jacob’ by Nobel laureate Olga Tokarczuk in fiction and the New York Times book edition of “The 1619 Project” in non-fiction.

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Thomas Cahill, popular history writer, dead at 82 https://momentodada.com/thomas-cahill-popular-history-writer-dead-at-82/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 21:01:53 +0000 https://momentodada.com/thomas-cahill-popular-history-writer-dead-at-82/ NEW YORK (AP) — Thomas Cahill, a scholar of ancient languages ​​and belief systems with a gift for popular storytelling who has engaged history readers with bestsellers such as “How the Irish Saved Civilization” and “The Desire for the Eternal Hills,” died at 82. Travis Loller, a family friend and Associated Press writer, says Cahill […]]]>

NEW YORK (AP) — Thomas Cahill, a scholar of ancient languages ​​and belief systems with a gift for popular storytelling who has engaged history readers with bestsellers such as “How the Irish Saved Civilization” and “The Desire for the Eternal Hills,” died at 82.

Travis Loller, a family friend and Associated Press writer, says Cahill died in his sleep Oct. 18 at his Manhattan apartment. The cause of death was not immediately known.

Originally from New York, Cahill attended Jesuit school in his early years and became a dedicated student of Latin and ancient Greek, as well as the Bible, philosophy, and classical literature. He wrote two books with his wife, Susan Cahill, in the early 1970s. But he gained a large following in the mid-1990s with the million-selling “How the Irish Saved Civilization”, in which he quoted the crucial – and unrecognized – preservation of classical texts from Ireland after the fall of the Roman Empire.

“Mr. Cahill is a scholar himself, and his writing is in the great Irish tradition he describes: lyrical, playful, penetrating and serious, but never too serious,” wrote New York Times critic Richard Bernstein. in 1995. “And even where his conclusions are not entirely convincing – they cling in places to rather thin reeds of evidence – they are still plausible and certainly interesting.

His book on Ireland was part of what he called his “Hinges of History” series, a broad and idiosyncratic review of Western civilization and the moments he saw as turning points, “a narrative of how we have become the people we are,” as he told the AP in a 2006 interview. “Desire for the Eternal Hills” focused on the New Testament and the life of Jesus, and “Sailing the Black Sea of ​​Wine ” celebrated the ancient Greeks. In “Mysteries of the Middle Ages”, he countered popular beliefs that the Middle Ages were just a time of superstition.

“Of course, there was a lot of ignorance, as there is in all eras,” he told the AP in 2006. “But the advances we associate with the Renaissance in the arts, science, education, scholarship, linguistics and even political experimentation began in the Middle Ages.

In addition to writing the story, Cahill was an education correspondent for The Times of London and a contributor to the Los Angeles Times Book Review. He has taught at Queens College, Fordham University and Seton Hall University, and for several years was director of religious publishing at Doubleday, which has published much of his work, most recently the book of 2013 “Heretics and Heroes”.

Cahill majored in Classical Literature and Medieval Philosophy at Fordham University and earned an MA in Film and Dramatic Literature at Columbia University. But his approach to his books was shaped in part by his Jesuit background, by the depth of his learning and the monotony of how he learned it. He will later resolve to combine scholarly discipline and a conversational tone.

“What academic writers forget is that everyone on Earth buys books to be entertained or entertained,” he said in 2006. “Yes, they want to learn things, but they don’t want to nor be bored to death while they learn these things.”

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Literature finds an unlikely social media partner in TikTok https://momentodada.com/literature-finds-an-unlikely-social-media-partner-in-tiktok/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 06:15:02 +0000 https://momentodada.com/literature-finds-an-unlikely-social-media-partner-in-tiktok/ Best-selling German author Sarah Sprinz’s series of young adult books has received a boost from an unlikely side: a community of literature enthusiasts on the social media platform TikTok. The #BookTok trend has exploded lately, with an increasing number of readers posting reviews and engaging with writers, while authors are using it to promote their […]]]>

Best-selling German author Sarah Sprinz’s series of young adult books has received a boost from an unlikely side: a community of literature enthusiasts on the social media platform TikTok.

The #BookTok trend has exploded lately, with an increasing number of readers posting reviews and engaging with writers, while authors are using it to promote their works.

To some, this seems counterintuitive — a platform known for its short, often light-hearted videos isn’t the obvious place to encourage an activity like reading that requires deep concentration.

But videos with the hashtag are racking up billions of views, and have helped boost the popularity of some books, as bookstores rush to set up booths where creators can film videos.

The trend “is super important to me,” Sprinz, author of the hit series “Dunbridge Academy,” which takes place at a boarding school in Scotland, told AFP during an interview at the Frankfurt Book Fair.

“Personally for me, I believe that played a role (in my success) because I saw a lot of videos recommending my books.”

The trend, which often sees creators post emotionally charged book reviews, has been particularly effective in attracting a new audience of young readers, Sprinz said.

“I think it’s good that thanks to TikTok, a completely new and younger target audience is becoming aware of reading,” the 26-year-old said.

– ‘Impact on book sales’ –

According to TikTok – which is owned by Chinese company ByteDance – #BookTok has received over 84 billion video views so far on the platform, and hit genres include romance and fantasy.

“#BookTok has become the place for book recommendations and discoveries, as well as for sharing reviews and tapping into fan culture,” said Tobias Henning, Managing Director, TikTok Germany and Central and Eastern Europe.

It “also has a real impact on book sales around the world,” he added.

One success attributed to #BookTok is American author Colleen Hoover’s novel ‘It Ends With Us’, which saw sales skyrocket after gaining traction in the community.

A typical review shows a woman sobbing as she reads the novel, with music and a voiceover reading, “I’ve never cried so long after a book.”

With #BookTok’s growing influence, the annual Frankfurt Fair, the world’s largest publishing event, made TikTok a partner for the first time.

Several creators and enthusiasts are also present.

“I do mostly (Tiktok) content on books, mostly novels, and I try to upload two videos a week,” TikTok user Sofia Reinbold, who came to the office, told AFP. living room after reading on the platform.

The 17-year-old added that she had received “comments from people who bought books after watching my videos”.

– ‘Multiplier effect –

For Sprinz, the #BookTok phenomenon is driven by the fact that TikTok is a visual platform, allowing people to show what they think of a book.

And people stuck at home during the coronavirus pandemic may have accelerated the trend.

“A lot of people maybe felt a bit lonely and isolated,” she said, adding that it was a good platform “to network again and find common hobbies like reading.”

She also played down the suggestion that there was somehow a contradiction between spending more time on social media and trying to promote literature, noting that people read in different ways these days, including on e-books. and smartphones.

But social media alone “can’t make a book successful,” she said.

“TikTok and #BookTok are kind of a multiplier and a good opportunity to pass on book recommendations.”

But “there must be more than that,” she said. “The book must of course be good.”

lep-sr/hmn/raz

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Watching Fantasy in Black and White – Technique https://momentodada.com/watching-fantasy-in-black-and-white-technique/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 02:03:48 +0000 https://momentodada.com/watching-fantasy-in-black-and-white-technique/ Burning dragons, hoarded mountain of gold, wars under the mountain and the grand names of Thorin Oakenshield in tales of old. I grew up completely fascinated by fantasy literature and strove to get my hands on everything from Rick Riordan to Kathryn Lasky to CS Lewis. One of my greatest discoveries was a complete set […]]]>

Burning dragons, hoarded mountain of gold, wars under the mountain and the grand names of Thorin Oakenshield in tales of old. I grew up completely fascinated by fantasy literature and strove to get my hands on everything from Rick Riordan to Kathryn Lasky to CS Lewis. One of my greatest discoveries was a complete set of “The Chronicles of Narnia” on sale for $4 at my local library, and by the age of 12 I was completely immersed in Middle-earth.

But there was always one thing I couldn’t ignore: the way the terms “black” and “white” were dichotomized. We need to be more careful about how we use these terms for their associations bleed through the pages of Middle-earth for power in our world just as they do in Mordor.

Fantasy literature often centers on good and evil, with the former usually being attributed with adjectives such as “light, white, and whimsical”, while the latter is attributed with “dark, dark”. and mean.

The first and perhaps the most famous is the story of “The Ugly Duckling”, which revolves entirely around the sheer “ugliness” of the lonely black duckling in the flock. He is ostracized by the other ducklings because of the black color of his feathers. At the end of the story, the duckling matures and is considered the most beautiful of all, but only after she sheds her ebony feathers and a new crop of brilliant white feathers has arrived. take their place.

Continuing this trend, JRR Tolkien’s “The Hobbit” mentions in a short poem:

The wind was on the parched moor

but in the forest no leaf stirred:

there were shadows night and day,

and silent dark things crept below.

He passed the lonely mountain naked

and swept over the dragon’s lair:

there are dark black rocks

and flying smoke was in the air.

Going beyond mere blackness to include darkness, as these terms are often used interchangeably, here darkness in the form of shadow is used to illustrate slyness, mystique and dangerousness – something unique. ‘unspeakable and mostly black, waiting out of sight to do unspeakable harm. The second part after the ellipses refers to the darkness and blackness of the rock to emphasize and reaffirm the undesirability of the situation: between the dark rocks and the thick black smoke, the adventurers of the story are placed in a impossible position where an immanent and invisible danger awaits them.

Conversely, the same book refers to “four beautiful white ponies… [who] went out and soon returned bearing torches in their mouths, which they kindled on fire and stuck in low brackets on the pillars of the room around the central hearth”, immediately contrasting the undesirable and impossible darkness seen in the poem with the beauty of the ponies whites who save the protagonists by providing them with fire and therefore a way out of their “dark” situation.

There are exceptions, but they always come back to this central idea. For example, “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” features a witch who is famous for her whiteness. The Ice Queen, also known as the White Witch, is the main antagonist of the book and though everything about her, from her bleached hair laced with jagged shards of ice, to her steely pale complexion, her wardrobe strewn with snow, is white, this outward expression is but a reflection of her dark and inner evil.

The source of his magic, as Aslan condemns it, is dark magic after all.

Before you label me as a social justice hippie warrior who over-analyzes what should just be “a good read,” note that I’m not the only one commenting on this war between dark and light. In 2014, André 3000 wore a bold lettered jumpsuit in Lollapalooza that read “across cultures, the darkest people suffer the most.”

And why indeed?

Undoubtedly, this repeated system of labeling used both in the most famous literature, in the case of “The Hobbit”, “The Lord of the Rings” and “The Chronicles of Narnia”, and in the most fundamental, in the case of “The Ugly Duckling”, plays a role.

Going even further back to the 20th century, Muhammad Ali also challenged a similar binary: wonderful and innocent things like angels and heaven are represented as white, even vanilla cake is labeled “angels food”. , while angry objects like black cats and the ugly duckling are depicted in black; the chocolate cake, in foil that looks like the vanilla cake, is labeled “devil’s food”.

This impact is doubly felt by dark-skinned people within communities, as André 3000’s most directly contested message. Colorism or “prejudicial or preferential treatment of people of the same race based solely on their color,” as defined by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker, is inflamed by this type of language.

Also, this comparison and expression of blackness and whiteness may not be as intuitive as one might think. While reading “Kane Chronicles” by Rick Riordan, I was pleasantly surprised to learn that in ancient Egypt the themes of balance and chaos (analogous to our good and our bad) were represented by black. and red. Black was considered auspicious because it was the color of rich, fertile soil, from blackness came life and abundance. Conversely, red was viewed with rebuke because nothing grows in red soil – it represented barrenness and starvation.

Understanding that the color palette is only what we limit it to is essential as we move forward as writers and readers, because ultimately the associations we give to these colors extend as we label people too.

I don’t mean that the works of Tolkien and Lewis were the origin of this dichotomy or that they should be banned. On the contrary, they are two of my greatest literary heroes. I can’t count how many afternoons I’ve spent buried deep in my bedroom, obsessing over “one ring to rule them all, one ring to find them, one ring to bring them all, and in the dark the bind”.

I am simply drawing attention to this disparity so that readers are aware of it, question it, and leave it out of our literature as we become literary greats ourselves.

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