Architecture – Momento Dada http://momentodada.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:11:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://momentodada.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-30T222814.835-150x150.png Architecture – Momento Dada http://momentodada.com/ 32 32 Andrew N. Liveris Building wins first gong at 2022 AIA QLD Architecture Awards https://momentodada.com/andrew-n-liveris-building-wins-first-gong-at-2022-aia-qld-architecture-awards/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 07:11:51 +0000 https://momentodada.com/andrew-n-liveris-building-wins-first-gong-at-2022-aia-qld-architecture-awards/ Over 70 projects in 11 categories were recognized and honored at the Australian Institute of Architects’ Queensland Architecture Awards 2022 held recently in Brisbane. The Andrew N. Liveris building by Lyons and m3architecture has won the Queensland Medallion, the highest honor awarded at the Queensland Architecture Awards. The project also received the Jennifer Taylor Prize […]]]>

Over 70 projects in 11 categories were recognized and honored at the Australian Institute of Architects’ Queensland Architecture Awards 2022 held recently in Brisbane.

The Andrew N. Liveris building by Lyons and m3architecture has won the Queensland Medallion, the highest honor awarded at the Queensland Architecture Awards. The project also received the Jennifer Taylor Prize for Educational Architecture, the Karl Langer Prize for Urban Design and a State Prize for Interior Architecture.

Unveiled in April, the Andrew N. Liveris Building is the new 11-story home of the School of Chemical Engineering at the University of Queensland’s St Lucia Campus.

The judging panel, comprised of renowned architects and design industry leaders from across the state, commended the Andrew N. Liveris Building for representing “the highest level of excellence and thoughtfulness in design.” design “.

The president of the jury, Shy Tay, described as exceptional the quality of the creations submitted for the awards this year. “The jury found it particularly meaningful to see projects rooted in local communities – buildings that met people’s needs but were also delivered with pleasure,” Tay said.

Heritage architecture

In addition to their contribution to the Andrew N. Liveris Building, m3architecture was honored for their work on the Treacy Precinct at St Joseph’s Nudgee College. The Brisbane-based practice won the Don Roderick Prize for Heritage Architecture for a sensitive restoration of the school’s fundamental buildings.

Public Architecture

Brian Hooper Architect’s Muttaburrasaurus Interpretive Center has won the FDG Stanley Prize for Public Architecture. An open-air museum in Muttaburra showcasing the story of Muttaburrasaurus, the most complete fossilized dinosaur skeleton found in Australia, the Interpretation Center features impressive gabion walls made of local stone to create a dynamic relationship between the building and the surrounding landscape. The roof is a lightweight, floating orb structure that invites natural light and ventilation into the space.

Residential architecture

In the residential category, the Robin Dods Award for Residential Architecture – Homes (New) was awarded to the LiveWorkShare House by Bligh Graham Architects. Located in Brisbane’s satellite town of Samford Village, LiveWorkShare House responds to new working arrangements and an increasingly strained housing market by combining a family home, an office and a smaller additional residence.

Award-winning projects named:

Category | Project | Architect

Queensland Medal 2022 | Andrew N. Liveris Building | Lyon + m3architecture

The Jennifer Taylor Award for Educational Architecture | Andrew N. Liveris Building | Lyon + m3architecture

The Karl Langer Prize for Urban Design | Andrew N. Liveris Building | Lyon + m3architecture

The Beatrice Hutton Prize for Commercial Architecture | Wooden tower | CHURCH

The Don Roderick Heritage Award | Nudgee College of St Joseph – Treacy Precinct | m3architecture

The GHM Addison Award for Interior Design | Studio BVN Brisbane | BVN

The FDG Stanley Prize for Public Architecture | Muttaburrasaurus Interpretation Center | Brian Hooper Architect

The Elina Mottram Award for Residential Architecture – Houses (Alterations and Additions) | Green house | Steendijk

The Robin Dods Award for Residential Architecture – Houses (new) | LiveWorkShared house | Blig Graham Architects

The Job & Froud Award for Residential Architecture – Multiple Dwellings | Anne Street Garden Villas | Anna O’Gorman Architect

The Hayes & Scott Award for Small Project Architecture | Riverside Green South Shore Parks | Hassel

The Harry Marks Award for Sustainable Architecture | LiveWorkShared house | Blig Graham Architects

Emerging Architect Award | Tanya Golitschenko

EmAGN Project Award | Princess Theater | JDA Co

Sustainable Architecture Award | Harry Gibbs Building Commonwealth Courthouses | Australian Construction Services in association with Peddle Thorp Architects

COLORBOND® Award for Steel Architecture (QLD) | Ridgewood House | Robinson Architects

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cohlmeyer architecture transforms an architectural ruin into a furniture store and showroom in montreal https://momentodada.com/cohlmeyer-architecture-transforms-an-architectural-ruin-into-a-furniture-store-and-showroom-in-montreal/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 16:01:26 +0000 https://momentodada.com/cohlmeyer-architecture-transforms-an-architectural-ruin-into-a-furniture-store-and-showroom-in-montreal/ Cohlmeyer architecture transforms abandoned structure into social hub On booming St-Laurent Boulevard in downtown MontrealCohlmeyer Architecture has rejuvenated a neglected building in a vibrant exhibition gallery and furniture retail store. The main concept of the project was to reinvent an architectural ruin into a social gem that benefits both the business and the urban context. […]]]>

Cohlmeyer architecture transforms abandoned structure into social hub

On booming St-Laurent Boulevard in downtown MontrealCohlmeyer Architecture has rejuvenated a neglected building in a vibrant exhibition gallery and furniture retail store. The main concept of the project was to reinvent an architectural ruin into a social gem that benefits both the business and the urban context. Behind a facade of reclaimed bricks, an oasis of greenery unfolds, inviting visitors to enter the store. The whole project optimizes the opening and allows a maximum contribution of natural light to the interiors. Generous amounts of glazing envelop the entire building, also providing a clear visual connection to a forecourt.

the city required that the building’s existing facade facing the street be retained and restored as part of the development approval process

all images by Cohlmeyer Architecture

integrate an urban forecourt garden

With this project, the architects aimed to breathe new life into a historic and bustling district of Montreal, for the mutual benefit of the project and the city. The original building comprised nearly 19,000 square feet over three full floors, a fourth level at the rear of the property, and a shallow basement.

The structure incorporates an urban forecourt garden that serves as both a pocket garden for the neighborhood and an iconic threshold for the retail showroom. To achieve this, approximately 40 feet (12 meters) of the depth of the building was dug. The client wanted to transform the dilapidated and shallow basement into a functional showroom space, thus recovering part of the ground surface devoted to the forecourt. The fourth level serves as an office.

Each long floor of the showroom is pierced with floor-to-ceiling openings allowing all levels of the showroom to have visible access to the garden. The architects kept part of the garden empty to let natural light flood inside. As for the plan, each interior space is stripped down to the maximum to ensure a spacious open layout without partitions.

an architectural ruin transforms into a high-end furniture boutique and showroom in bustling montreal
an urban green space

“The end result looks simple and is the result of many different approaches to solving the joining of materials, edges, spaces and light. Details were designed, built, then taken apart to be rebuilt, the same way furniture is designed. Similar to Scarpa’s approach, we were in conversation with the trades at the start of production and learned methods or processes that would inform a solution that would not have been possible without collaboration,” comments the studio.

an architectural ruin transforms into a high-end furniture boutique and showroom in bustling montreal
an intricate ceiling adds to the space without competing with furniture

an architectural ruin transforms into a high-end furniture boutique and showroom in bustling montreal
architects apply simple gestures to raw materials to create luxury retail space

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How to Reinvent Your Data Flow Architecture: A Summary https://momentodada.com/how-to-reinvent-your-data-flow-architecture-a-summary/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 21:39:44 +0000 https://momentodada.com/how-to-reinvent-your-data-flow-architecture-a-summary/ This is part of Solutions Review’s Premium Content Series, a collection of reviews written by industry experts in maturing software categories. Data volumes are exploding, driven primarily by tech-focused companies (e.g. not just large corporations, but emerging players in fintech, adtech, edtech, etc.). However, old-school companies have also taken the leap, adding IoT sensors to […]]]>

This is part of Solutions Review’s Premium Content Series, a collection of reviews written by industry experts in maturing software categories.

Data volumes are exploding, driven primarily by tech-focused companies (e.g. not just large corporations, but emerging players in fintech, adtech, edtech, etc.). However, old-school companies have also taken the leap, adding IoT sensors to automobiles, factory lines and oil pipelines, as well as collecting and analyzing customer interactions from their websites. , digital products and customer support. The data is used for everything from automating road toll payments to measuring earthquakes to monitoring assembly lines, as The Wall Street Journal reports. But most data never leaves the nest. IDC estimates that nearly two-thirds of 2020 data existed only briefly. Of the other third, much of it sits in storage for years, unused.

This is because data is born as a new event in a source system and the value of these data events degrades very quickly. So you need to use new data quickly so you can take action while it still matters. And to understand and act on real-time events, you need to implement streaming data technologies.

Make no mistake about it, leveraging streaming data requires a paradigm shift. We’ve spent decades taking data events and batch processing them on an hourly, daily, or weekly basis. Delivering real-time action requires a stream processing mindset where new data is continually compared to historical data to identify changes of interest that the business can act on.

This means that your organization can no longer rely on the data infrastructure it has deployed over the past three decades. Unless it’s updated to support a streaming process, your analytics will fare poorly compared to what’s possible.

In short, you need to change your mindset and reinvent your architecture. Here’s how you can do it.

Architect for events

Although data is born in the form of events, these events are usually grouped as this is the process supported by traditional data infrastructure. A traditional data pipeline typically involves batch processing with defined start and end times (for example, batch processing at the end of every hour).

Obviously, you cannot enable real-time scanning using batches. Batch processing creates delay, and that delay equates to missed opportunities. To access more up-to-date analytics, you need to adopt a streaming data pipeline approach where logic runs on each new event as it happens and allows you to detect changes as they happen. they happen.

In addition to providing more recent data, stream processing has the added benefit of being traceable upstream. A well-designed streaming architecture uses an “event source” approach that keeps a log of every change made to the dataset since its creation. This allows you to make changes to your logic and rerun new logic on old data. So if you discover a bug or an unexpected change in your source data, you can rerun your pipeline. This makes your data operations more flexible and resilient.

Re-engineered for freshness at scale

Imagine you want to implement a “next best offer” system, which combines real-time behavioral data of an app user with all sorts of contextual data about them (e.g. browsing history, location , demographics) to determine which offers make the most sense to that individual. This kind of instant action relies on data freshness enforced by strict service level agreements (SLAs).

As these SLAs get tighter, the amount of data you get and process increases, and the number of pipelines you run increases (as data is used by more data consumers), you will need to scale your infrastructure in a flexible way to keep your data fresh.

As your needs change and your demand grows, ensure you can maintain real-time performance by using cloud data processing services with elastic scaling. Make sure you don’t have long-running operations that would slow down your process, or excessive memory usage that might cause service-level inconsistencies.

Implement a real-time data lake

Data streaming requires a number of new technologies. You need a way to ingest events into a stream, store them affordably, process them efficiently, and distribute the transformed data to various analysis systems. The good news is that there are technologies available and proven in the market. Altogether, these technologies constitute a lake of real-time data.

Stream ingestion: You must install and manage a message queue such as Apache Kafka, Amazon Kinesis, or Azure Event Hub that can collect events in streams.

Data lake storage: streaming data can accumulate to enormous size, so a cloud data lake based on object storage such as Amazon S3 or Azure Data Lake Service (ADLS) is the way to go the most economical to manage it. Many tools will allow you to connect message queues to a data lake.

Processing platform: Once the data is stored in the data lake, you can either use Apache Spark (the tasks are written in Python, Java, or Scala) or a SQL-based tool, such as Upsolver, to combine recent real-time data with historical data to feed. downstream systems. This mixing happens continuously as new data arrives.

Data lake optimization tools: Data lakes are very affordable, but they require performance optimization, what we call PipelineOps. Here are some examples. First, a compression process is needed to turn millions of single-event files into larger files that are processed efficiently. Second, the mixing of data streams and batch data requires the orchestration of tasks required to perform the processing task. Third, a state store is required for stateful processing that joins batches to streams.

These processes can be accomplished through a set of specific tools such as Airflow for orchestration or RocksDB, Redis or Cassandra as a state store, these tools being glued to the processing engine via code. You can also implement a declarative data pipeline platform such as Upsolver, which automates these PipelineOps functions.

Analytics systems: Once you’ve successfully optimized your data lake, you’ll be able to generate your broadcast data as “live tables” (these update automatically as new events arrive) that can be used by any analysis system.

Streaming is the way to go – and it’s time to move on

As you can see, streaming requires a change of mindset, thoughtful planning, and new infrastructure. However, if you invest the time and effort to implement modern streaming processes and systems, you can take advantage of timely new data and analytical insights.

Latest posts by Ori Rafael (see everything)

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PPG to Showcase Customizable Innovations for Architects at AIA Architecture Conference https://momentodada.com/ppg-to-showcase-customizable-innovations-for-architects-at-aia-architecture-conference/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 20:50:33 +0000 https://momentodada.com/ppg-to-showcase-customizable-innovations-for-architects-at-aia-architecture-conference/ PPG will showcase a wide range of its architectural coatings at AIA Conference on Architecture 2022 (A’22), June 22-25 in Chicago. The company will highlight its PPG CORAFLON Platinum Powder Coating, PPG DURANAR Liquid Coating, PPG DURASTAR Liquid Coating, PPG DURAFORM Liquid Coating and PPG CORAFLON ADS Field Applied Coating. Also on display will be […]]]>
PPG will showcase a wide range of its architectural coatings at AIA Conference on Architecture 2022 (A’22), June 22-25 in Chicago.

The company will highlight its PPG CORAFLON Platinum Powder Coating, PPG DURANAR Liquid Coating, PPG DURASTAR Liquid Coating, PPG DURAFORM Liquid Coating and PPG CORAFLON ADS Field Applied Coating. Also on display will be PPG’s COPPER ARMOR™ liquid coating, which is an interior paint with antiviral and antibacterial properties. PPG representatives, including Lynsey Hankins, PPG Color and Design Manager, will be on hand at booth 3011 to provide detailed information about the company’s products and services to architects, designers and others.

“The AIA Architecture Conference is the industry’s most anticipated annual event,” said Kevin Braun, PPG vice president, global, Industrial Coatings. “Since we last met two years ago, PPG has launched several new innovations for the architectural market, including PPG Coraflon Platinum and Copper Armor coatings. We’re excited to talk to visitors in person about these advancements, as well as showcasing our extensive color services and tools.

One of the company’s newest product offerings, PPG Coraflon Platinum Powder Coating is a patent-pending fluoroethylene vinyl ether (FEVE) fluoropolymer coating. The new product can create finishes never possible with powder, including mineral tones, anodized, stone and terracotta textures and looks. It complies with the Fenestration and Glazing Industrial Alliance and American Architectural Manufacturers Association (FGIA/AAMA) Standard 2605.

Trusted by architects and designers for over 50 years, PPG Duranar polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) coil and extrusion coatings deliver proven aesthetics and durability for buildings of distinction around the world, including the Empire State Building and the Louvre Pyramid. More recently, PPG coatings have been used to protect and enhance Allegiant Stadium in Las Vegas, the Bulletin Building in Philadelphia, Hudson Yards in New York and Centene Stadium in St. Louis.

PPG Durastar Siliconized Polyester (SMP) coating provides an ultra-durable one-coat system and provides a smooth, finished appearance, while providing exceptional hardness and resistance to scuffing and scuffing. Coatings are designed for specific industrial applications with durable pigments for long lasting color, hardness and stain resistance.

Ideal for new construction and restoring existing architectural metal, PPG Coraflon ADS Coating is a field-applied fluoropolymer that delivers factory performance in a two-component, air-cured system.

Copper Armor paint is an EPA registered antiviral and antibacterial* paint containing CORNING® GUARDIANT technology proven to kill 99.9% of bacteria and viruses^, including SARS-CoV-2 , on the painted surface in two hours. Product efficacy was measured using tests that simulate real-world contamination, as required by the EPA for products making claims against harmful pathogens.

Visitors can also learn about PPG’s high performance coatings for flooring, including general purpose, chemical and wear resistant formulations, and the PPG PSX™ 700 coating, which is a patented breakthrough for long-term protection of steel. Participants are encouraged to explore the world of color with free gifts from PPG THE VOICE OF COLOR tools.

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MSME Day: MSME Day 2022: The Architecture for Stronger and Equitable Economic Growth in India https://momentodada.com/msme-day-msme-day-2022-the-architecture-for-stronger-and-equitable-economic-growth-in-india/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 04:17:00 +0000 https://momentodada.com/msme-day-msme-day-2022-the-architecture-for-stronger-and-equitable-economic-growth-in-india/ In March 2020, a few weeks after the first lockdown, we at ETRise decided to deviate from what we normally write about and focus on Covid-19 and its implications for small businesses. The writing was on the wall – as long as the lockdown lasted and Covid was around, small businesses would be badly hit. […]]]>
In March 2020, a few weeks after the first lockdown, we at ETRise decided to deviate from what we normally write about and focus on Covid-19 and its implications for small businesses. The writing was on the wall – as long as the lockdown lasted and Covid was around, small businesses would be badly hit. What we didn’t expect was for the pandemic to continue for more than two years.

The millions of lives lost, the thousands of businesses destroyed and the livelihoods that disappeared marked an intense and tragic chapter in our lives. MSME Day coverage for 2020 focused on “Indian Small Business Restart” as we at ETRise wanted to help MSMEs find their place after a prolonged period of lockdown. In 2021, as the world tried to break the shackles and vaccines brought a glimmer of hope, Indian exports and millions of smaller exporters profited from the boom. For MSME Day 2021, we focused on how India can contribute to the world. India’s overall exports (goods and services) reached a record high of $669.65 billion in April-March 2021-22, jumping 34.50% from the corresponding period last year.

The 74th Plenary Session of the United Nations General Assembly on April 6, 2017 adopted the resolution to observe June 27 as Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises Day or MSME Day. The idea behind the resolution was that MSMEs play a crucial role in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, in particular promoting innovation, creativity and decent work for all. MSME Day should focus on MSMEs and their contributions to the global economy.

This year, the focus of MSME Day is a bit different. The world finds itself in flux again, this time not so much because of a pandemic, but largely because of tectonic shifts in economic conditions. The Russian-Ukrainian conflict, supply chain disruptions, inflation, skyrocketing commodity prices and food shortages threaten to derail a nascent global recovery. In fact, a report by the International Rice Research Institute indicates that there will be 36 million tonnes less rice – enough to feed 500 million people. Behind each of these events lies the fragile global supply chain that has been lacking since the start of the pandemic.

MSMEs have always faced challenges, from access to credit to ease of doing business. But the issues around the supply chain are new. These have an impact on all aspects of our lives. From our toothpaste to the food we eat, the supply chain ensures that all goods reach us efficiently and economically. For businesses, everything from sourcing raw materials to sales to forecasting demand depends on the supply chain. If the supply chain weakens, the very foundation of a business is at risk.

India is seizing economic opportunities, but supply chain disruptions have impacted short-term growth and clouded the long-term outlook. Every sector and every industry must be prepared to reinvent itself. For MSME Day 2022, ETRise focuses on the need to “strengthen India’s supply chain to power self-reliant MSMEs”. Politics, technology, leadership, skills, and the entire ecosystem must develop new capabilities, augment existing ones, and prepare for a new world. The aspirations of a trillion dollar economy cannot be achieved on creaky infrastructure, suboptimal operations, and disregard for people and society.

MSME Day 2022 will delve deeper into these crucial aspects so that disruption does not come in the way of the quest for sustainable and inclusive growth. MSME Day 2022 content shows how businesses and organizations can become resilient and build a better world. On June 27, MSME Day 2022 will host key government officials, industry leaders and experts to deliberate on the way forward to the next normal. To hear the voices that matter most, subscribe here.

(The one-stop destination for MSMEs, ET RISE provides news, views and analysis on GST, exports, finance, policy and small business management.)

To download The Economic Times news app to get daily market updates and live trade news.

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Boston-based architecture firm appoints new leadership https://momentodada.com/boston-based-architecture-firm-appoints-new-leadership/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 04:02:27 +0000 https://momentodada.com/boston-based-architecture-firm-appoints-new-leadership/ Architecture and design firm SGA has a new direction at the helm. The Boston-based company The company, founded in 1991 by Al Spagnolo, Jeff Tompkins and Bill Gisness, will now be run by equal owners: CEO Adam Spagnolo; Gable Clarke, president of interior design; and John Sullivan, president of architecture. Al Spagnolo, meanwhile, will move […]]]>

Architecture and design firm SGA has a new direction at the helm.

The Boston-based company The company, founded in 1991 by Al Spagnolo, Jeff Tompkins and Bill Gisness, will now be run by equal owners: CEO Adam Spagnolo; Gable Clarke, president of interior design; and John Sullivan, president of architecture. Al Spagnolo, meanwhile, will move into a chairman role.

Since its inception, SGA has employed approximately 130 people in Boston and New York, and is currently working on over 15 million square feet of active projects. Some of the company’s projects in the area include a future expanded headquarters for Ginkgo Bioworks and the interior design of the headquarters for hair care company Living Proof in the Boston Seaport; passive house projects at Wheaton College and Williams College; and LINX, a science and technology campus in Watertown.

The leadership transition comes at a time when real estate projects related to life sciences – an area of ​​practice in which SGA has worked for more than a decade – have exploded across the region, and employers are considering how to design workplaces to attract employees. office.

“It’s an exciting time to be a designer,” Clarke said. “The spirit of SGA has always been very entrepreneurial. Al, Bill, and Jeff really instilled that in the three of us, and we’re really excited to instill that in others.

SGA’s workforce has more than doubled over the past two years to reach 130 people today. Most employees are based at the company’s headquarters in downtown Boston, with about 30 in New York City. Adam Spagnolo, a native of Lynnfield and son of Al Spagnolo, will remain based in New York.

The bulk of SGA’s work has focused on its two home markets, Greater Boston and New York, but the company is increasingly being called upon to tackle projects in other parts of the country, a said Adam Spagnolo.

“It’s really important for us to continue to be a diverse company, which has always been the DNA of the company,” said Adam Spagnolo. “As an architecture, engineering or construction firm, I think you have to be prepared to follow the ebbs and flows of the market.”

Beyond Sullivan, Spagnolo and Clarke becoming owners, SGA also named five new directors and seven directors. Clarke will be the first woman to serve as president in the company’s three-decade history.

“Architecture hasn’t always been the most diverse profession in the world, but for us to have women owners and more women moving up the ladder…is really important to us,” said Adam Spagnolo.

“It’s really about benefiting from other points of view,” Clarke added.

SGA will retain its headquarters in Boston.


Catherine Carlock can be reached at catherine.carlock@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @bycathcarlock.

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Architecture students participate in the Envision Resilience Narragansett Bay Challenge https://momentodada.com/architecture-students-participate-in-the-envision-resilience-narragansett-bay-challenge/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 20:20:39 +0000 https://momentodada.com/architecture-students-participate-in-the-envision-resilience-narragansett-bay-challenge/ A team of students from the School of Architecture led by Julia Czerniak, Associate Dean and Professor, and Professor Ted Brown, have spent the past five months immersing themselves in the culture, values, history and peoples of two towns on the shores of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, as part of the Envision Resilience Narragansett Bay […]]]>

A team of students from the School of Architecture led by Julia Czerniak, Associate Dean and Professor, and Professor Ted Brown, have spent the past five months immersing themselves in the culture, values, history and peoples of two towns on the shores of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, as part of the Envision Resilience Narragansett Bay Challengewhich called on university students across the country to develop adaptive and creative solutions to sea level rise.

Sponsored by Rest Nantucketthe challenge, through a design studio in spring 2022, tasked multidisciplinary teams of graduate and undergraduate students from six participating universities – University of Rhode Island, Rhode Island School of Design, Roger Williams University, Syracuse University, Northeastern University and the University of Florida – with the reimagining of at-risk sites in Rhode Island’s Narragansett Bay area through an iterative design-driven approach.

The students’ mission was to develop innovative pathways in the face of sea level rise based on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) High Curve. Based on these projections, Narragansett Bay will see a seal level rise of three feet by 2050, five feet by 2070, seven feet by 2085 and nine feet by 2100.

“Instead of feeling anxiety and paralysis about climate change, we have a window of opportunity to imagine how to adapt and even thrive in the future,” says Wendy Schmidt, Founder of ReMain Nantucket. “While the challenge began as an exercise in big ideas, we hope it will also spur big action – in Narragansett Bay and in every coastal city around the world, where hundreds of millions of people live.”

Czerniak and Brown incorporated the challenge into their spring 2022 guest critique studio, “Design Scenarios for Adaptive Coastal Communities,” which takes the position that while protection is a way to cope with rising seas, we must engage climate change not only through mitigation but by re-examining our lifestyles and consumption habits.

“The overall mission is to redesign our world, not just save it,” Czerniak says. “There are a lot of wrongs that can be righted.”

The students focused on the town of Warren and the village of Wickford, two small, quite different historic coastal communities along Narragansett Bay that share a common future; they go slowly underwater. By researching moments of natural and cultural adaptation across time and across scale, visiting sites for field verification, and meeting with local experts and residents, they tested a set of scenarios design for each of the sites in order to adapt to the challenges of climate change. and be resilient to future changes through the prism of architecture.

Using scenario planning, an appropriate approach that provides a way to assert control over a rapidly changing world by identifying hypotheses and determining possible responses, the students set up the scenarios for each city in the form of IF, THEN statements, then isolated and tested what that meant. alternatively RETREAT & ADAPT (moving colonies to higher ground and proposing new, more climate-friendly lifestyles); EMBRACE & ENGAGE (remaking shorelines to participate in rising waters and opening them up for common use by human and non-human species); or PROTECT & ABSORB (preserving invaluable resources by innovating to stay put).

Responding to the needs of these communities, the students presented ambitious, bold and innovative ideas, challenging entrenched ways of thinking and presenting a radical reimagining of these coastal areas.

Town of Warren

Known as the smallest town in the smallest county in the smallest state, the City of Warren, Rhode Island’s shores are bordered by Belcher Cove and Warren River. Although not as popular with tourists as its neighbors, Warren, once a bustling whaling and shipbuilding port, still draws a regular seasonal crowd to its waterfront and downtown area. Ancestral home of the Pokanoket Nation, Warren continues to depend on its coastal location for much of its economy, way of life and recreation.

Students Clara Faure-Dauphin ’23 (B.Arch) and Ayana Ayscue ’23 (M.Arch) focused on the RETREAT & ADAPT scenario by rethinking land use for higher density communities, for repair land and for public and ecological corridors of connectivity. In introducing mixed-use development on Metacom Avenue, the existing residential area, the team prioritized a retired land to retired land relationship.

RETREAT & ADAPT screenplay for the city of Warren by Clara Faure-Dauphin ’23 (B.Arch) and Ayana Ayscue ’23 (M.Arch)

Instead of treating the coastline as a barrier where the sea endangers people, team members Ruoxi Li ’23 (B.Arch), Muge Zhang ’24 (B.Arch), and Tony Fitzgerald ’23 (M .Arch) used the EMBRACE & ENGAGE Scenario to reimagine Belcher Cove as a multi-species commons that changes with sea level rise and can be used seasonally for recreation, habitation, and business.

2. EMBRACE & ENGAGE Scenario

EMBRACE & ENGAGE scenario for the city of Warren, drawing by Ruoxi Li ’23 (B.Arch)

Students Khoi Nguyen Chu ’24 (B.Arch) and Zhuofan Song ’24 (B.Arch) focused on the PROTECT & ABSORB scenario by proposing a new recreational waterfront along Water Street, a major street near the coastline with a large commercial area that is exposed to the sea. Reviewing the city’s historic plans, the team postulated that the current coastline had lost its urban form and proposed to reintroduce it by designing a new climate-friendly development and economically generating: mixed-use housing with commercial spaces.

PROTECT & ABSORB scenario for the city of Warren, drawing by Khoi Nguyen Chu ’24 (B.Arch)

Village of Wickford

The original home of the Narragansett Nation, Wickford Historic Village sits on the west side of the bay and is one of the oldest preserved colonial villages in the country, dating back to the 17th century, with structures from the early 18th and of the 19th century. With a long maritime and fishing history, Wickford’s economy remains water-bound through boating, fishing and tourism. Its population is twice that of Warren and is a popular summer destination for sailing, shopping and fine dining.

The student team of Zhi Fei Li ’23 (M.Arch), Raquel Rojas ’23 (M.Arch) and Kaylee Holmes ’23 (M.Arch) studied the RETREAT & ADAPT scenario by rethinking the way people move across the lands to the heights. On Post Road, northwest of the existing village, they proposed a new intergenerational riverside community with ecologically rich social spaces for human and non-human species, sustainable dense collective housing, and new routes and types of transportation.

RETIREMENT & ADAPTATION scenario

RETREAT & ADAPT script for Wickford Village by Zhi Fei Li ’23 (M.Arch), Raquel Rojas ’23 (M.Arch) and Kaylee Holmes ’23 (M.Arch)

Using the EMBRACE & ENGAGE scenario, students Troy Schleich ’23 (M.Arch) and Ruth Shiferaw ’23 (M.Arch) proposed an adapted version of the “Wickford Walk” in contrast to the current historic walk connecting areas important in the city. Defined by its role as a historic seaside village, the new Wickford Walk offers three key areas – recreational, educational and ecological – that allow residents and visitors to embrace a new relationship with water.

EMBRACE & ENGAGE scenario

EMBRACE & ENGAGE screenplay for Wickford Village by Troy Schleich ’23 (M.Arch) and Ruth Shiferaw ’23 (M.Arch)

Students Parker VanderVen ’24 (B.Arch) and Yifei Xia ’23 (M.Arch) studied the PROTECT & ABSORB scenario, with a focus on historic assets threatened by sea level rise. choosing to protect Wickford’s historic district, the team rethought (over time) the preservation and engagement of the village’s colonial buildings along Main and Brown streets. Through alternative strategies such as the introduction of absorbent surfaces, the use of natural barriers, the elevation of buildings and infrastructure, and the deployment of new forms of immersive technologies such as augmented reality, they have proposed new ways to protect the memory of the village and to celebrate the history of Wickford.

PROTECT & ABSORB Scenario

PROTECT & ABSORB Scenario for Wickford Village, Drawing Yifei Xia ’23 (M.Arch)

In late April, students pitched their ideas virtually to the entire Envision Resilience Challenge cohort, including teams from other participating universities, during a final jury examwho praised them for their clear and impactful proposals, their superb illustrations and their articulate arguments.

Syracuse University team students and faculty

Students and faculty from the Syracuse University team at the opening of the exhibition “Envision Resilience: Designs for Living with Rising Seas”.

In addition, a month-long exhibition titled, Envision Resilience: designs for living with rising seaswhich features adaptive designs by teams of university students reimagining infrastructure, shorelines and neighborhoods in Rhode Island communities vulnerable to sea level rise, is currently on display at WaterFire Art Center, Gallery in Providence, Rhode Island. The free exhibition runs until June 26 and is open Wednesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and until 9 p.m. on Thursday.

“We are thrilled to bring this exhibit to Rhode Island and support ReMain Nantucket in this important work,” said Barnaby Evans, Executive Artistic Director of WaterFire Providence. “This show is a wonderfully hands-on and engaging extension of the environmental conversations we’ve had here at WaterFire. These exciting proposals will broaden our thinking and enrich our perspectives as Rhode Island communities strive to find the best solutions to address rising sea levels.”

For more information, visit the Envision Resilience Narragansett Bay Challenge Website.

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Inclusion Models – Architecture https://momentodada.com/inclusion-models-architecture/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 05:24:10 +0000 https://momentodada.com/inclusion-models-architecture/ Freed from exaggerated dreams of a healing environment, architectures of care can repair the old logic of separation of mentally and physically handicapped people, which often resulted in segregation. The reintegration of the disabled person into society is part of the challenge of inclusion. Aligning spatial parameters and housing designs with their special and changing […]]]>

Freed from exaggerated dreams of a healing environment, architectures of care can repair the old logic of separation of mentally and physically handicapped people, which often resulted in segregation. The reintegration of the disabled person into society is part of the challenge of inclusion. Aligning spatial parameters and housing designs with their special and changing needs is another, as is the reverse: asking how architecture can help citizens take on ordinary caregiving tasks for their disabled neighbours. The experimental architecture of Monnikenheide, a residential care complex for people with disabilities in Zoersel, Belgium, has approached inclusion as a dynamic design challenge since its inception in 1972.

The history of Monnikenheide begins with its founders, Wivina and Paul Demeester. As a member of the Flemish Christian Democratic Party, Wivina Demeester was State Secretary in several federal and regional governments from 1985 to 1999, during which time she held positions in the fields of health, social assistance and public administration. She was also a decisive figure in the landscape of architecture in Flanders, playing a fundamental role in the development of both the position of architect of the Flemish government and of the Flemish Institute of Architecture. His interests in politics, healthcare and architecture culminated in finding a suitable living solution for the couple’s son, Steven, who has Down syndrome.

In the 1970s, people with disabilities still often lived either in or on the fringes of psychiatric institutions. According to Wivina Demeester, they reached a breaking point when looking for accommodation for their son, especially during a visit to the famous Stropstraat in Ghent, the main campus of the Brothers of Charity, which provides services care for all kinds of patients. , mentally ill and disabled. After the visit, the Demeesters began their effort to provide alternative housing that radically includes people with disabilities in society and recognizes their specific territorial needs and desires. In Monnikenheide, the traditional logic of asylums with large “bedhouses” has been replaced by an open framework of small-scale facilities that function as surrogate families.

Monnikenheide is made up of a series of residential facilities built as part of a suburban housing estate, a typical settlement pattern, in the Kempen area. Its facilities are spread over a wooded lot at the back of the Demeester family villa, located on the edge of a nature reserve. The projects built differ from each other, but what is more important than their aesthetic differences is the design intelligence that has been achieved by experimenting with architectural typologies and spatial parameters. A walk through Monnikenheide today presents an evolution of care, following a progressive insight into how architecture can support the inclusion of people with disabilities.

Family Replacement Units

Monnikenheide’s architecture is defined by an evolving typology of the surrogate family unit, which allows small groups of residents to function almost independently. The first lodging house, designed by Bruno Boulanger in 1970 and which today serves as a central service building, originally consisted of three identical pavilions. Constructed using the Danilith pre-engineered system, a single hallway connected the common services pavilion in the middle to the boys’ and girls’ pavilions on both sides. With a large capacity in its collective bedrooms, the repetition of the pavilions contrasts sharply with the classic typology of dormitories used in hospitals. This emphasis on small units is recognizable in all the other buildings on the site.

When renovated in 2003 by Jo Peeters, the building’s capacity was reduced to one group of residents per pavilion, with living rooms placed on one side of the hallway and individual bedrooms on the other. The central corridor has also been extended, and a fourth pavilion has been added in the enfilade. The spine that connects all the pavilions together has been transformed with huge glass windows to ensure it doesn’t look like a hospital hallway. A launderette and a therapy pool have been constructed facing the new entrance to the building, which, as separate facilities, are intended to stimulate the use of the outdoors and improve the dynamics of entry and exit. The recent building of From Eiken (2017), designed by UR architects, added an additional fifth pavilion to the spine, with a facade that suggests it’s the end of the line.

The next building in Monnikenheide, the Monnikenbos (1980), was designed as group housing for permanent residence by Luc Van den Broeck. Like a scout bivouac, the complex brings together in a common entrance hall three houses of eight people each in a slightly anthroposophical style of bricks and sloping roofs. In 2020, the Monnikenbos complex was dismantled and used as the base for a new, expanded residential facility by UR architects. The renovation removed the central entrance pavilion which served as access to the three pavilions, thus upsetting the logic of circulation. Today, the three pavilions are even more linked to each other; since the space between them is no longer hidden behind doors, it functions as a shared open courtyard for the different groups of residents.

Spaces of inclusion

The architecture of Monnikenheide also uses its spatial environment for the inclusion of people with mental and physical disabilities. The idea was to free people with disabilities from the logic of asylums by situating them in the normal urban and social fabric, more precisely the typical Flemish suburbs. The center is built as an open estate in the woods. Lodges are scattered around the Demeester estate, and residents are encouraged not only to use the smaller units tailored to their specific care needs, but also to wander through the woods, the neighborhood and even the center of the village, all without, if possible, being accompanied by staff.

In its attempt to meet the specific care needs of its residents, Monnikenheide has pioneered the architectural typology of sheltered housing, which offers people with disabilities the opportunity to live independently. Although the Monnikenheide location is considered inclusive, the setting ultimately limits the possibilities for some guests, especially in terms of self-sufficiency. The House at the Voorne (2002), designed by Dirk Somers (then part of Huiswerk, now Bovenbouw) was therefore not located on the Monnikenheide campus, but along the main street just outside the village center of Zoersel. The house has capacity for eight residents, who are expected to organize their work and live independently. Nursing staff are only available to help with breakfast and evenings.

The location of the reception center offers residents direct proximity to social services (bakeries, grocery stores, bus stops, etc.) and thus promotes their participation in the village community. Society can act as a support network for people with disabilities. Not only its facilities, however, but also its people. For this reason, the house at church (2005), designed by Johan De Coster (then part of RAUM, now VDC architects) is located in the heart of the village, just opposite the main church. The central location allows residents to establish a relational network and, in turn, allows villagers to unwittingly care for people with disabilities, for example by helping them cross the street, giving them change at the checkout at the grocery store, etc.

Interlaced lines of operation

Sheltered housing is not just about its spatial setting; it also shows variations in the typology of a retirement home, and more particularly in the arrangement of studio-type rooms compared to common rooms. In the Maison à la Voorne, the common space remains quite limited and uncluttered, the living room being at the same time dining room, kitchen and atrium, the individual rooms being designed as studios equipped with a kitchenette. The internal logic of the house in the church, however, is designed more similarly to a classic house by emphasizing the living room and the kitchen, which function as comfortable and familiar common areas, and an open staircase which leads to single bedrooms upstairs.

The typological innovations of the sheltered housing projects were reflected in the new buildings of the main campus in Monnikenheide. Huis aan ‘t Laar (2012), designed by Peter Swinnen (then part of 51N4E, now CRIT. architects), transposes the typology of the sheltered house into a free-standing house in the woods. Huis aan ‘t Laar is used for people with greater care needs but who are still able to live independently. The house brings together two groups of eight people around a spiral staircase around which the groups are constantly in contact but never touch. The rooms are conceptualized as small L-shaped studios with two windows, so each room has corners with different perspectives.

The same logic appears in the construction of Villa Kameleon (2021), designed by FELT, a sheltered house located a stone’s throw from the Demeester estate. The house presents itself as a free-standing villa, blending into the suburban plan, but brings together eight L-shaped rooms in a hexagon-shaped floor plan. The central hall is a rather bare circulation space that allows residents to access their private rooms without having to pass through the common living rooms or dining rooms, thus enjoying privacy and independence in their daily comings and goings.

Coda

The short history of architectural production in Monnikenheide testifies to the dynamic logic of inclusion of people with mental and physical disabilities. While the Monnikenheide settlement negated the old logic of separation underlying the asylum and its stigmatizing habitat patterns by offering residents the right to a territory of their own, its subsequent developments opened a negation permanent negation that stretches and rethinks the territorial scope of the inhabitants. Beyond good and bad, it diversifies options for adapting to changing needs, not only between different people, but also across a lifetime.

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National Architecture Biennale winner designs green villas in Romania’s first complete suburb – Amber Forest https://momentodada.com/national-architecture-biennale-winner-designs-green-villas-in-romanias-first-complete-suburb-amber-forest/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 13:36:26 +0000 https://momentodada.com/national-architecture-biennale-winner-designs-green-villas-in-romanias-first-complete-suburb-amber-forest/ Alesonor, the promoter of the first complete suburb, presents the concept of the Amber Forest green villas. Some of the more than 20 types of green villas in different sizes and designs, to meet multiple needs and preferences, are designed by the architectural office Workshop 1408. Designed for high performance, the villas will be built […]]]>

Alesonor, the promoter of the first complete suburb, presents the concept of the Amber Forest green villas. Some of the more than 20 types of green villas in different sizes and designs, to meet multiple needs and preferences, are designed by the architectural office Workshop 1408.

Designed for high performance, the villas will be built to the highest building standards, with quality finishes, to provide a healthy lifestyle, privacy and security for all their residents.

Studio 1408’s architectural team has successfully implemented Amber Forest’s vision of modern design in impressive, energy-efficient buildings in harmony with nature, contributing to the mission of developing a sustainable community that incorporates all facilities for a complete lifestyle in the first green suburb.

“We believe that people benefit greatly from living in a sustainable and engaged community and we have contributed solutions, both at master plan and detailed design scale, to achieve this in the Forest of Amber.

Our approach to this project was to address sustainability not only in terms of resources and consumption, but also in social and cultural terms, including all aspects that contribute to the well-being of residents: density of development, access to outdoor space, sense of security, privacy, connection to the community. The spaces in which we move and that we share – streets, gardens, cycle paths – shape the way we meet and interact with our neighbors and have the potential to improve or test these relationships.

For all living units, whether large or small, we are committed to ensuring comfortable and healthy indoor and outdoor spaces, following design practices that consider temperature, lighting, noise, ventilation and air quality pollution”said Diana Bugnariu, architect of Studio 1408.

“Our strategy is committed to achieving exceptional standards in the development of high quality, energy efficient and environmentally friendly buildings, while forming communities that offer all the integrated facilities for a balanced lifestyle. Thus, we offer our customers the possibility of having balanced relationships with family, friends and neighbors who share the same values, and with whom they can spend their free time on sports fields, in social spaces or in the park, with the children. Studio 1408 helped us realize our vision both in a multitude of villa types, suitable for all needs, but also by contributing to the development of the concept of the project. Together, we are setting a new standard both in the development of environmentally friendly residential buildings with impressive design, but also in the development of complete communities, which offer a unique lifestyle in Romania”said Alex Skouras, managing partner of Alesonor.

The Forêt d’Ambre suburb offers more than 20 types of villas from 2 bedrooms and also 14 types of apartments from 2 rooms, in low-rise buildings Gf + 2F + 3R meeting multiple needs and preferences, designed by architectural offices: the team of architects from the developer Alesonor, Studio 1408, ADNBA, Bobotis + Bobotis Architects, Studio A19 and PUZ directed by Prof. Dr Arch. Tiberius Florescu.

Amber Forest houses are the first houses in Romania that meet the NZEB energy standard, established by the European Union since 2021, being energy-efficient buildings, and at the same time quality sustainable constructions that incorporate cutting-edge technologies.

The price of the available 2-bedroom green villas starts at 212,000 euros plus VAT. The price for 2-room green apartments starts at 110,000 plus VAT.

Romania’s first green suburbAmber Forestincludes more than 500 green villas and 200 green apartments, developed on 31 hectares, with only 15% of the built-up area, with the lowest land occupation coefficient.

The suburb will have complete and high quality infrastructure – 3 hectares reserved for school, kindergarten, extracurricular and sports grounds, 5.3 hectares for parks and green spaces and also a polyclinic, pharmacy, supermarket, restaurant and café, coworking space with conference rooms, bakery, market, running and cycling tracks, as well as direct access to the Băneasa Forest, the largest forest around Bucharest.

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Dodson Headlines List of AIA Award Winners in ACT https://momentodada.com/dodson-headlines-list-of-aia-award-winners-in-act/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 20:50:21 +0000 https://momentodada.com/dodson-headlines-list-of-aia-award-winners-in-act/ The Australian Institute of Architects has announced Melinda Dodson as the 2022 ACT President’s Medal recipient. The Principal of Melinda Dodson Architects is a Past National President of the Institute and holds Life Fellow status. Dodson has demonstrated a strong commitment to sustainable cities through architectural practice, research, industry leadership and public advocacy for over […]]]>

The Australian Institute of Architects has announced Melinda Dodson as the 2022 ACT President’s Medal recipient.

The Principal of Melinda Dodson Architects is a Past National President of the Institute and holds Life Fellow status. Dodson has demonstrated a strong commitment to sustainable cities through architectural practice, research, industry leadership and public advocacy for over 25 years.

“Melinda embodies what it is to be a professional who acts in the public interest to improve community outcomes with a passion for providing inclusive sustainable built environments,” said Jane Cassidy, President of the ‘AIA ACT.

“She strongly believes that architecture holds the key to solving many of our cities’ frustrations. His research informs the development of strategies to improve housing choice and affordability and reduce carbon emissions from housing, relative to ACT 2045 net zero goals.”

Dodson is also the founder of the Canberra Low Carbon Housing Challenge, which showcases sustainable building and construction in the region. The challenge was named the recipient of the Clem Cummings Medal, which recognizes the contributions of non-architects and architects to architecture in the public interest. The CLCHC team is made up of Dodson, Rob Henry of Rob Henry Architects and David Clarke of Tallowwood Architecture.

“The Canberra Low Carbon Housing Challenge team is to be commended for raising public awareness through the competition and the digital and face-to-face public displays,” Cassidy said.

“The team has achieved excellent results in its short life and has already developed an ambitious program of research projects, peer education and exhibitions to extend its reach from individual housing to developments at more large scale.”

GHD’s Russell Pfitz has been named the winner of the ACT Architecture Professional Practitioner Award for 2022, based on his impact on the profession over three decades and his expertise in technical architecture. Pfitz has worked on complex industrial and institutional architectures, including water and energy, defense and security, and has developed significant heritage and technical expertise.

“His technically-focused heritage work ensures that our important architecture will endure for future generations,” read a statement from the award jury.

The future of architecture in the ACT has been recognized with Kate Shepherd of Rob Henry Architects winning the 2022 Emerging Architect Award. In a short time, Shepherd has shown incredible longevity, breadth and commitment to the industry through his volunteer work and industry leadership.

“Using knowledge gained through practice, Kate has applied considerable design skill and fine technical detail to commercial and residential scale. Kate Shepherd exemplifies what it means to be an architect in society,” says the jury.

The Student Achievement Awards at the University of Canberra went to Amanda Marshall for the highest five-year grade point average at the University of Canberra, earning her the ACT Chapter Student Medallion. Roger Clarke won the John Redmond Award for the highest achievement in the first three years of the Bachelor of Built Environment (Architecture).

University of Canberra student Juliana Zubovic has won the Daryl Jackson Alastair Swayn Graduate Award for the highest grade point average during the two-year Master of Architecture course.

Picture: provided

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